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JULY 1987 

Issue H 322 



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USA S2.*>> 

I vs. $»'<> 

A VVGE Publication 



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Table of Contents 
The National Championships 

Finally, there's a contest where the "Little 

Gun" has a chance, where guile wins out 

over gigawatts - KE7C 

The Two-Meter 
Transverter Project 

Build this VMOS transverter and use all 

of your Kenwood TS-940's bells and 

whistles — on two meters! . . W6YUY 

Big Time Packet 

With the help of a mainframe comput- 
er, KITE can control a packet station 
from his desk— or from around the 
world KITE 



30 



32 



44 



Reviews 

New Life on Two: The Yaesu FT-290R 11 144- MHz Mobile/ Portable 
Transceiver and the Tonna F9FT 9-Element 144-MHz Portable Yagi. KT2B 



First in Filtering: AFtronic's SuperSCAF 

Reverse Phone Patch?: The 5000A Phone Remote. 



■ i r 



■ **■*>■■ 



W4THU 

N1EJF 



p. 44 



Move Fast: The Stone Mountain Engineering QSYer. , . Z21EI 

Digitize Your Dial: Torrestronics' Universal Digital Frequency Display, 

.. WA1WMZ/2 



* « * * 



p. 77 



Talk on Water: Sailing with Hum Radio KA 1 MPL 



Departments 



p. 66 



P' 32 



i ■ 



74820"0872S 



07 




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* * . . * 



*■ * . » 



Above and Beyond 

ATV .V... 

Barter 'N* Buy . ■ 

Dealer Directory . 

DX 

r mi i ***•*-•>*■■'* 

HAMSATS 

Letters ...,,,... 
List of Advertisers 
Looking West - . . 
Never Sav Die . * . 

■r 

New Products 

NK6K> Packet 

Propagation 

QRP 

QSL of the Month 

RTTY Loop 

73 International 

Special Events 

WEATHERSAT 



* V + * * 



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22 

26 

27 
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58 
64 
50 
90 
68 
66 
62 
12 
76 
77 
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14 
56 
90 
80 
. 7 
. 4 
70 
84 
52 
72 



Review Rave: YaesifsFT-290Rii 



1.2GHz Pioneers 

All ICOM 1.2GHz gear allows 
novices to talk on the air under 
the Novice Enhancement ruling! 



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THE ONLY 1.2GHz SYSTEM. . . ANYWHERE 



• IC-1271A Base Station 

• IC-12AT Handheld 

• NEW! IC- 1200 Mobile 

• 1C-RP1210 Repeater 

Explore 1.2CHz with [COM. Only 
ICOM offers the most complete line of 
ham gear for l.2GHz...the IC-127IA full- 
featured base station transceiver the 
IC-I2AT handheld, the new IC-1200 
mobile and the IC-RPI2I0 repeater. 
So, get away from the crowd and be a 
pioneer on 1.2GHz. 

The IC-127IA 1240- 1300MHz base 
station transceiver features 10 watts of 
RF output power. 32 memories, scan- 
ning and multi-mode operation includ- 
ing ATV (amateur TV), 

A variety of options are available 
for the 1C-I27IA including the IOEX3I0 
voice synthesizer, UT-15S CTCSS en- 




coder/decoder. IC-PS25 

internal AC power sup- 
ply, AG-1200 preampli- 
fier and the TV- 1200 TV 

interface 

unit. 



TV- 1200 



The IC-I2AT handheld covers 
from 1 260-1 299.990MHz, has ten mem- 
ory channels, memory scan, program 

scan and programmable offset. It also 
features an LCD readout, RIT and 
VXO, 32 built-in tones and a DTMF pad. 

The new IC-1200 1.2GHz mobile 
transceiver has 21 memory channels, 
scanning, an HM-14 up/down scanning 
mic RIT, large LCD readout and 10 
watts power output. Accessories in- 
clude the PS-45 slim-line external 
power supply. 



The IC-RP 1210 completes your 
L2GHz system. It features a field 
programmable 1198 channel DIP 
switch}, high stability PLL, repeater^ 
access to 
CTCSS, 
three- 
digit 
DTMF 
decoder 
forcontro 
of special 
functions, 
1 watts, 
select- 
able hang 
time and 
ID'er. 




• » 





ICOM 



First in Communications 







ICOM America, Inc. 2380-1 16th Avenue NE, Bellevue, WA 98004 Customer Sen/Ice Hotline (2DS) 454-7619 

3150 Premier Drive, Suite 126 + Irving, TX 75063 / 1777 Phoenix Parkway. Suite 201, Atlanta, GA 30349 

ICOM CANADA, A Division of ICOM America, Inc.. 3071 - #5 Road, Unit 9, Richmond, B.C. V6X 2T4 Canada 

All stated speC'^cations are approximate and subject to change without notice or o&^gaiion All lOOM radios si g ni fi ca ntly exceed FCC regulations Smiting spurious emissions, t 2GM£387 



KMta l<iWK 



MODEL 8000 DUPLEX 

Desk top or rack mounted versions 

Pulse or fully regenerated tone dialing 

Full and half duplex operation 

Half duplex privacy mode 

Internally squelched audio 

Powerful toll call protection 

Secret toll override code 

# up # down or multi-digit access 

Ringout 

End to end signalling (DTMF standard) 

Auto answer on 1st, 2nd, 4th or 8th incoming ring 

Mobile to mobile signalling 

Telephone initiated control mode 

Dip switch selectable hybrid compensation capacitance. 

Programmable timout and mobile activity timers with unique beeps 

Disconnect beep 

Separate repeat level control 

Lightning protection 

Connectors for options 

1 0-1 6VDC powered 

28 dip switches make all features user programmable and 
selectable. 

OPTIONS 

6001 AN I code validator (up to 1024 access codes) 

8002 1000 call two tone signalling 

8003 32 calJCTCSS signalling 

8004 FCC registered coupler 

8005 Centralized computer billing system 




- ~ ■ 



DUPLEX INTERCONNECT 



MOOILfW 



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DUPLEX INTERCONNECT 




NOW ANYONE CAN ENJOY FULL DUPLEX! 

Merely connect a CSI Model 8000 to any duplex base {such as the 
Yaesu FT-2700RH) and presto. . .you have an instant full duplex 
mobile telephone system! 

Or, the 8000 can be connected to any repeater for shared use. A 
lan-dline caller can selectively call any mobile on the system with 
(end to end) regenerated DTMF (standard), CTCSS (optional) or two 
tone sequential (optional), Mobiles can even selectively call 
each other! 

Knowing the correct code, a caller can take control of the 8000 from 
any touch phone and voice communicate with mobiles that are not 
equipped with touch dialers. 

No other duplex patch offers so much for so little. 



FIRST CLASS FEATURES and PERFORMANCE 

. . . COACH FARE! 

MAKE YOUR MOBILE TELEPHONE SYSTEM FLY WITH A PATCH FROM CSI 



PRIVATE PATCH III 




A high performance VOX based patch for simplex systems and for 
operation through remotely located repeaters. 

Thousands of Private Patch Ill's are in both amateur and com- 
mercial use worldwide. Private Patch III enjoys a reputation that is 
second to none. 

CW ID and other powerful features make Private Patch III the best 

deal going in Vox Simplex phone patches! 



• II 



EL CS-9500 




For exemplary simplex performance, the CS-9500 control station inter- 
connect incorporates a full l /a second of landline to mobile electronic 
voice delay, Voice delay assures compatibility with the slowest 
CTCSS or trunked repeater systems. 

Attractively styled to complement any decor. 



Three simple connections to base radio 

Simplex operation (VOX, of course) 

Digital "fast VOX" 

Toll restrict 

Secret toll disable code 

Selectable tone or pulse dialing 



STANDARD FEATURES (Both models) 

• Automatic busy signal disconnect 

• Control interrupt timer 

(maintains positive control in simplex mode) 

• Three digit access code (eg. * 73) 

• Ringout (reverse patch} 

• Ringout inhibit if channel is in use 



• Lightning protectors 

• Spare relay position 

• 110VAC supply 

• And much more 

OPTIONS: 12 VDC or 230 VAC power 

FCC registered coupler 




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The Nicest 

Things Come 
In Small 
Packa 




The SS-32HB is a new hybrid sub-audible 
encoder plucked from Communications Special- 
ists" Hothouse. It has grown through a cross of 
the time tested SS-32* the subminiature SS-32M 
and space age micro circuitry. This program- 
mable 32 tone encoder measures a scant ,5 x 1.0 
x . 15 inches; no small wonder it allows the addi- 
tion of continuous tone control to a bunch of 
hand held transceivers that lack space. 

Why not snip your problems in the bud, with 
our fast, one day delivery and attractive one year 
warranty. 



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MFJ'S BEST 300 WATT TUNER HAS A CROSS-NEEDLE METER THAT READS SWR, FORWARD 

AND REFLECTED POWER - ALL AT A GLANCE, quality conveniences and a clutter free shack at a super price. 

A cross-needle SWR'Wattmeter gives you SWR, forward and reflected power 
- all at a single glance, SWR is automatically computed with no controls to set. 
Has 30 and 300 watt scale on easy to read 2 calor lighted meter (needs 12 V), 

A handsome black brushed aluminum cabinet matches all the new rigs Its 
compact size (10 x 3 x 7 inches) takes only a little room. 

You can run full transceiver power output - up to 300 watts RF output - and 
match coax, balanced lines or random wires from 1,3 thru 30 MHz Use <t to 
tune out SWR on dipoles. vees, long wires, verticals, whips, beams and quads, 

A 300 wan 50 ohm dummy load gives you quick tune ups and a versatile six 
position antenna switch lets you select 2 coa* lines (direct or thru tuner), 
random wire or balanced line and dummy toad. 

A large efficient airwound Inductor - 3 inches in diameter - gives you plenty 
of matching range and less losses for more watts out, 100 volt tuning capacitors 
and heavy duty switches give you safe arc-free operation. A 4:1 baiun is built-in 
to match balanced lines. 

Order your convenience package now and enjoy, 




MFJ-949C MFJ's best 300 watt tuner is now even better! 
- ' -^ Q _ The MFJ-949C all-in-one Deluxe Versa Tuner II gives 
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MFJ 12/24 HOUR LCD CLOCKS 



mm mm 




MFJ 108 $19.95 MFJ 107 $9.95 

Huge 5/8 inch bold black LCD numerals make 
these 24 hour LCD clocks a must tor your ham 
shack. Choose from a dual clock that displays UTC 
and local time or the single unit that displays 24 
hour time. 

Mounted in a brushed aluminum frame, these 
clocks feature 5/8 inch LCD numerals and a sloped 
lace for easy across the room reading, Botti also 
feature easy set month, day, hour, minute and se- 
cond functions that can be operated in an alternating 
time-date display mode, MFJ 1 08. 4Vw1 x2 inches; 
MFJ 107. 2V«x1x2 inches Battery included 

MFJ-962B VERSA TUNER III 




MFJ9628 $229.95 

Run up to 1.5KW PEP and match any feediine 
continuously from 1 .8 to 30 MHz: coax, balanced 
tine or random wire. 

Lighted Cross-needle Meter reads SWR, forward 
and reflected power in one glance. Has 200 and 
2000 watt ranges. 6 position antenna switch 
handles 2 coax lines, random wire and balanced 
lines. 4:1 balun. 250 pi, 6 kv variable capacitors. 
1 2 position ceramic Inductor switch, Smaller size 
matches new rigs; 1 3 /< x 4V? x 14 7/8 inches- Flip 
stand for easy viewing Requires 12V tor tight. 

MFJ RANDOM WIRE TUNER 

MFJ 16010 



$39.95 






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MFJs ultra 
compact 200 

watt random wire 

tuner lets you 

operate all bands anywhere with any transceiver 

using a random wire. Great for apartment, motel, 

camping, Tunes 1.8-30 MHz. 2x3x4 inches. 



REMOTE ACTIVE ANTENNA 

54 Inch remote active antenna mounts outdoor 
away from electrical nojse for maximum signal and 
minufmim noise pickup. Often outperforms long- 
wire hunoreds of feet long Mount anywhere-atop 
nouses. Durfdings oatccmes. apartments, ships 
Us*, with any radio to receive strong deaf signals 
[all over the world, 50 KHz to 30 MH/ High 
lie range eliminates intermodulation. Inside 
>l unit has 20 d 8 attenuator, gain control, 

jSwitch 2 receivers and auxiliary or active 
antenna. "On" LbO. 6x2x5 m 
50 ft coax. 12VDCor110VACwuh 

MFJ-1312, $9 95 

MFJ- 1024 

>*i#f $129-95 




CROSS-NEEDLE 
SWR/WATTMETER 




MFJ 615 

$59.95 

MFJ's cross-needle 
SWR/Wattmeter 
gives you SWR; 
forward and re- 
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all at a single 
glancel SWR is 
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computed no controls to adjust. Easy to use push 
buttons select three power ranges that give you OflP 
to full legal limit power readings. Reads 20/ 
200/2000 W forward. 5/50/500 W reflected and 
1:1 to 1:5 SWR on easyto-read two color scale, 
UghterJ meter needs 12 V. ±.10% lull scale 
accuracy. 6V2x3V4x4Vz inches 

COMPACT SPEAKER 

MFJ 280 $18.95 

Mobile speaker, Tilt bracket on 
magnetic base, 3V* mm phone 
plug, Use with 8 and 4 ohm im 
pedances. Handles 3 walls audio. 

HANDHELD TELESCOPING 
ANTENNAS WITH BNC 

MFJ-1710. $9.95, 3/8 wave 2 meter. 
Pocket clip. 5 V 24W. 
MFJ- 1712, $14.95, V* wave 2 meter; 
5/8 wave 440 MHz 7W - 19". 
MFJ-1714, $16.95, Vi wave 2 meter. 
End ted halfwave dipole. Shorter, 
lighter, more gain, less siress than 
5/8 wave mounted on handheld. When 
collapsed it performs like rubber duck. 




MFJ "DRY" DUMMY LOADS 



MFJZ62 

$64.95 



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MfJ-260 

$26.95 

MFJ's "Dry" dummy loads are air cooled - no 
messy oik Just right for tests and fast tune up. Non- 
inductive 50 ofim resistor in aluminum housing with 
SO 239. FuJI load to 30 seconds, de-rating curve to 
5 minutes MFJ 260 (300 watt), SWR 11:1 -30 
MHz. 1,5:1. 30-160 MHz, 2Vh2Vix7 inches, 
MFJ-262 (1 KW), SWR 1.5 :1 30 MHz. 3x3x13. 

MFJ DELUXE ELECTRONIC 
KEYER 



MFJ407B 

$69.95 



MFJ 4078 Deluxe Electronic Keyer sends iambic, 
automatic, semi auto, or manual. Use squeeze, 
single lever or straight key. Plus/minus keying. 8 50 
WPM Speed, weight, tone, volume controls, On/Off. 
Tune, Semi-auto switches. Speaker. RF proof. 
7x2x6 inches. Uses 9 V battery. 6-9 VDC or 110 
VAC with AC adapter. MFJ-1305, $9.95. 

ANTENNA CURRENT PROBE 
MFJ206 $79.95 




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MFJ Antenna Current Probe lets 
you monitor RF antenna currents 
no connections needed! 
Determine current distribution, RF 
radiation pattern and polarization 
ol antennas, transmission lines, 
ground leads, building wiring, guy 
wires and enclosures. 

• Determine rf ground system is effective. 

• Pinpoint RF leakage in shielded enclosures. 

• Locate best place lor mobile antenna. 

• Use as tuned field strength meter. 

• Indicate transmission line radiation due to 
SWR. poor shielding, antenna unbalance 

• Detect re radiation from gutters, guy wires that 
can distort antenna field patterns. 

Monitors RF current. 1 .8-30 MHz. Has sensitivity, 
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field strength meter 4x2x2 inches, 

TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
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CIRCLE 24 ON READER SERVICE CARP 




EVER SAY DIE 




IF MORSE CODE 
MAKES YOU CRAZY 

While most of the Extra-class 
hams I know quite clearly quali- 
fy for admission to the nearest 
funny farm, I got to wonder- 
ing about a few Extras who 
seemed just peculiar, but not 
really ofMhe-wall crazy. Could 
there possibly be a hole in my 
theory that Morse code at 20 



wpm bums out the sanity links in 
the brain? 

In-depth interviews with several 
seemingly semi-rational Extras 
uncovered a dimension V6 failed 
to consider. It turns out there 
was, in the past, a way to get the 
Extra license without blowing the 
brain's fuses* 

In every single case, the seem- 
ingly semi-rational Extra-cfass li- 



IGNf 25 KQk 




OSL OF THE MONTH 

To enter your QSL T maii it in an envelope to 73, WGE Center; 70 Rte, 
202 N. t Peterborough NH 03458, Attn; QSL of the Month. Winners 
receive a one-year subscription (or extension) to 73. Entries not in 
envelopes cannot be accepted. 

4 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



censees admitted to using the 
Bash System to gel their ticket 
and related funny call. It appears 
that with the Bash System there 
was no need to learn the code at 
all since Bash provided the exact 
copy for the FCC-run code exams. 
Alt one had to do was copy ft down 
while the code was playing. 

You know, I never thought ama- 
teur radio would have a reason to 
thank Dick Bash for his most lu- 
crative work. Bash did open the 
flood gates for a while, enabling 
tens of thousands of people to 
get thetr ham tickets with virtual- 
ly no understanding of either theo- 
ry or code, Alas, the VEC pro- 
gram scuttled Dick's cheat-sheet 
empire. 

Have you noticed what a high 
percentage of Extras wear cam- 
ouflage socks? Sure sign. 

Is it too late to nominate Dick for 
the Ham Of The Year award? Per- 
haps the Ham of Yesteryear. 

GOING DIGITAL 

The telephone companies have 
been digitizing voice in order to 
cram more conversations over 
their wires for over 25 years. 
These days many telephone 
switching systems automatically 
digitize voices for efficient han- 
dling and then convert them back 
to analog again. 

Have you ever heard a digitized 
voice circuit on a ham band? I 
haven't. I don't even recall seeing 
any articles on the subject in a 
ham magazine. I realize that most 
of you are getting old and are too 
tired to bother experimenting with 
new technologies, but after twen- 
ty-five years, how about at least 
experimenting with what's* by now 
an old technology? 

We hams are supposed to be 
the leaders — the pioneers— hell, 
it's in our rules! Yes, I know, In- 
centive Licensing knocked the 
stuffing out of our hobby 24 years 

Continued on p. 10 



QRM 



Editorial Offices 

WGE Curiier 

Peieflxrough NH 03456-1 1 94 

phone 603- 525-4201 

Advertising Office* 

WGE Center 

Peteftwough nh 03458- 1 194 

phone eOf>225-S0&3 

Circulation Office* 

WGE Center 

Peterborough NH 03459-1 194 

phone : 603 525-4201 

Manuscript* 

Contributions in the form ol manu- 
scripts with drawings and/or photo- 
graphs are welcome and wiH be con- 
sidered (or possible publication. We 
can assume no responsibility for loss 
or damage io any mater lal Please en- 
close a stamped, soft addressed en- 
velope with each submission Pay- 
ment for the use of any unsolicited 
male rial will be made upon accep- 
tance A premium will be paid lor ac- 
cepted articles thai have been submit- 
ted electron jcaiiy (CompuServe ppn 
70310.775 or MCI Mail "WGEPUB'") 
or on disk as an IBM compaiioJe ASCJI 
fie. All contrtbuiions should be direct- 
ed to the 73 editorial offices How lo 
Wriie for 73" guidelines are available 
upon request US cth/ens must in- 
clude their social security number with 
submitted manuscripts 

Subscription Information 

Rates: m the United Slates and Pos- 
sessions: One Year (12 issues) 
$24.97; Two Years (£4 issues} $45 47 
Elsewhere Canada and Mexico— 
$39.00/1 year only, US lunds Foreign 
surface mad— S4 5. 00/1 year only, US 
funds drawn on US bank Foreign air 
mail— please inquire To subscribe, re- 
new or change an address: Write to 
Subscription Department, PQ Bo* 
931, Farmingdale NY 11737. Return 
postage guaranteed For renewals 
and changes of address, include the 
address label Irom your most receni 
Issue of 73 For girt subscriptions, in- 
clude your name and address as well 
as those of grfi recipients . For ques- 
tions concerning your subscription. 
call toll free 1-0DO-227-57G2, To place 
subscription orders, please call us loll 
free at 1-800- 722 7790 between 9 am 
and 4:30 pm Eastern time or write to 
73 1 Subscription Department, PQ Box 
931 . Farmmodale N Y 1 1 ?37 73 Ama- 
teur Radio \ ISSN 074 s -080 X) & pub- 
lished monthly by WGE Publishing. 
WGE Center. Peterborough NH 
0345&-if94. Second class postage 
paid ai Peterborough NH 034 £8 and at 
additional mailing offices Canadian 
second class mail registration number 
9566 Entire contents copyright 
1966, WGE Publishing Ail rights re- 
served. No pan of this publication may 
be reprinted or otherwise reproduced 
without written permission from the 
publisher Microfilm Edition— Univer- 
sity Microfilm, Ann Arbor Ml 48106 
Postmaster: Send address changes 
to 73 Amateur Radio, Subscription 
Services, PO Bom 931, Farmingdale 
NY 11737 Nationally distributed by frv 
lernational Circulation Distributors 
Contract: Too bad— merely reading 
i his is a binding contract between you 
and the pub fisher To gel more pages 
for 73, more advertising is necessary 
To gel more advertising, more readers 
are needed. You hereby agree to be an 
official /^subscription ageni. You will 
tell every ham you contact that you 
read about h i m in 73 th is mon t h so he 'I I 
rush qui to buy a copy. It's just a little 
Green lie, so stop sweating I HI work. 
He II frantically read every word in the 
magazine, discovering us magnifi- 
cence in the process. Look, il reason 
doesn't work well have lo use sub- 
terfuge. 




V 






pacesetter in Amateur radio 



44 



DX-cellence!" 



TS-940S 

The new TS-940S is a serious radio 
for the serious operator. Superb 
interference reduction circuits and 
high dynamic range receiver com- 
bine with superior transmitter 
design to give you no-nonsense, no 
compromise performance that gets 
your signals through! The exclusive 
multi-function LCD sub display 
graphically illustrates VBT, SSB 
slope, and other features. 

• 100% duty cycle transmitter 

Super efficient cooling system using 
special air ducting works with the inter- 
nal heavy-duty power supply to allow 
continuous transmission at full power 
output for periods exceeding one hour 

• High stability, dual digital VFOs. 
An optical encoder and the flywheel 
VFO knob give the TS-940S a positive 
tuning "feer 

• Graphic display of operating 
features. 

Exclusive multi-function LCD sub- 



display panel shows CW VBT, SSB 
slope tuning, as well as frequency, 
time, and AT- 940 antenna tuner status. 

• Low distortion transmitter. 
Kenwood's unique transmitter design 
delivers top "quality Kenwood" sound. 

• Keyboard entry frequency selection. 
Operating frequencies may be directly 
entered into the TS-94QS without using 
the VFO knob. 

• QRM-fighting features. 
Remove "rotten QRM M with the SSB 
slope tuning, CW VBT, notch filter, AF 
tune f and CW pitch controls. 

• Built-in FM t plus SSB, CW, AM, FSK. 

• Semi or full break-in (QSK) CW. 

• 40 memory channels. 

Mode and frequency may be stored in 
4 groups of 10 channels each. 

• Programmable scanning. 

• General coverage receiver. 
Tunes from 150 kHz to 30 MHz. 

• 1 yn limited warranty. 
Another Kenwood First! 

Optional accessories: 

• AT-940 full range (160-10m) auto- 
matic antenna tuner • SP-940 external 




speaker with audio filtering * YG-455C-1 
(500 Hz), YG-455CN-1 (250 Hz). 
YK-88C-1 (500 Hz) CW filters; YK-88A-1 
(6 kHz) AM filter • VS-1 voice synthesizer 

• SO-1 temperature compensated 
crystal oscillator * MC-43S UP/DOWN 
hand mic. • MC-60A, MC-80, MC-85 
deluxe base station rnies. • PC-TA phone 
patch • TL- 922A linear amplifier 

• SM-220 station monitor • BS-8 pan 
display • SW-200A and SW-2000 SWR 
and power meters. 




Complete service manuals ate available 
tor afl Ke nwood transceivers and 
most accessories 

Specifications and prices are subject to 
change witnout notice or obligation 




MoreTS-940S information is available 
from authorized Kenwood dealers. 

KENWOOD 

KENWOOD U.SA CORPORATION 

2201 E. Dommguez St., Long Beach, GA 90810 
P.O. Box 22745, Long Beach, CA 90801-5745 



ft 


1 







CI A 



pacesetter in Amateur radio 



ThisHT 

TH-215A/315A/415A 

Full-featured Hand-held Transceivers 



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Kenwood brings you the 
greatest hand-held trans- 
ceiver ever! More than just 
"big rig performance," the 
new TH-215A for 2 m and 
TH-415A for 70 cm pack the 
most features and the best 
performance in a handy size. 
And our full line of accesso- 
ries will let you go from ham- 
shack to portable to mobile 
with the greatest of ease! 

• Wide receiver frequency range. 
Receives from 141-163 MHz, 
Includes the weather channels! 
Transmit from 144-148 MHz. 
Modifiable to cover 141- T51 MHz 
(MARS or CAP permit required), 

• TH-415A covers 440- 
449.995 fAHz. 

• 5. 2.5, or 1.5 W output, depend* 
ing on the power source. Sup- 
plied battery pack (PB-2) provides 
2.5 W output Optional NiCd packs 
for extended operation or higher 
RF output available, 

• CTCSS encoder built-in. TSU-4 
CTCSS decoder optional. 

• 10 memory channels store any 
offset, in 100-kHz steps. Each 
memory channel can store fre- 
quency, frequency step, offset, 
reverse switch position, and 
CTCSS frequency, 

• Nine types of scanning! Includ- 
ing new "seek scan" and priority 
alert. 

• Intelligent 2 -way battery saver 
circuit extends battery life. Two 
battery-save* modes to choose, 
with power save ratio selection, 

• Easy memory recall. Simply 
press the channel number! 

• 12 VDC input terminal for direct 
mobile or base station supply 
operation. When 12 volts is applied, 
RF output is 5 W! 

• New Twist-Lok Positive- 
Connect locking battery case, 

» Frequency entry by keyboard 
or UP/ OWN keys, 

• Priority alert function, 

• Monitor switch to defeat squelch. 
Used to check the frequency 
when CTCSS encode/decode is 
used or when squelch is on, 





KENWOOD 



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LAWP 




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SAVE 



» Large, easy-to-read multi- 
function LCD display with night 

light. 

• Audible beeper to confirm key- 
pad operation. The beeper has a 
unique tone for each key. DTMF 
monitor also included 

• Supplied accessories: Belt hook, 
rubber flex antenna. PB-2 standard 
NiCd battery pack (for 2 5 W oper- 
ation), wall charger, dust caps. 






£ 





TH-215A 



Optional Accessories: 

• P8-1 12 V, 800 mAH NiCd pack for 5 W 
output « PB-2 8.4 V, 500 mAH NiCd pack 
(2 5 W output) • PE-3; 7 2 V r 800 mAH 
NiCd pack (15 W Output) • PB-4: 7,2 V, 

1600 mAH NiCd pack (1.5 W output) 
» BT-5 AA cell manganese/alkaline battery 
case * BG-7 rapid charger lor PB-1, 2< 3. 
or 4 * BC-8 Compact battery charger 
« SMC- 30 speaker microphone * SC-!2. 13 
soft cases * RA-3 5 telescoping anten- 
nas * RA-88 StubbyOuk antenna * TSU-4 
CTCSS decode unit « VB-2530: 2m, 25 
W amplifier • LH-4, S leather cases 

• MB-4 mobile bracket ■ 6H-5 swivel mount 

• PG-2V DC cable • PG3C cigarette lighter 
cord with filter 



Complete setvtce manuals are available for aft Kenwood transceivers and most accessories 
Specifications and prices are subject to change without notice Of obligation 



TB-215A si 




NWOOD 

KENWOOD USA CORPORATION 
rnnumrcalfcris & Test Eqp?)3far}jent Group 



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And The 
Winner Is . 



DAVID LaFLEUR KAtMAF is the winner of 
73*s Instant ICOM Sweepstakes. Dave's 
card was drawn from over 15.000 entries at 
the Dayton Hamvention. Wayne W2NSD 
plucked the lucky card out of the barrel (see 
the photo). As you read this, Dave is tuning 
up an ICOM dream station consisting of: 
an IC-735 ail-band, all-mode, 100-Watt 
HF transceiver/general-coverage receiver; a 
PS-55 switching power supply: an SM-10 
desk microphone with built-in graphic equal- 
izer; an AT- 150 automatic antenna tuner; 
and a GC-5 world clock to keep track of all 
the hours he spends with his new sta- 
tion. Dave writes: "I was really surprised that 
I won this station, I just sent in a couple of 
entries. I've been putting off working on get- 
ting my General license* but now that I've 
got something new to use it's lime to start 
working on it." 73 would like to congratulate 
KAIMAF and thank ICOM America, Inc., for 
making it all possible. Keep an eye out for 
more 73 sweepstakes— you could be our next 
big winner. 



Free Lunch 



IAMS ARE CHEAP. But even the stingaest 
ham recognizes a deal when he sees one. 
If you enter the 73/ICOM Golden Giga- 
hertz Contest you will receive a free hat 
and T-shirt, courtesy of ICOM. If you want 
to see what they look like, take a gander at 
what Wayne is wearing on last month's cov- 
er. No strings attached, no minimum score, no 
tricks. Your total investment is 22c for 
the stamp plus wear-and-tear on your pencil. 
See the complete rules on page 23 and fill out 
the coupon. Then we'll see you on 1 .2 GHz on 
July 13-14, 



Novice World 



ICOM IS PUBLISHING a newieUer called 
Novice World which is aimed at building 
the confidence of new Novices and getting 
them on the air with a minimum amount of 
trouble. The first issue covers an explana- 
tion of Novice Enhancement, tells you how 
to set up your first station, gives you step* 
by-step instructions on what to say during 
that first OSO, explains what some of the 
bells and whistles on modern equipment do, 
lists the propagation characteristics of the 
various amateur bands, tells you how to 
construct a dipole. and gives you a quick- 
reference Novice frequency allocation chart. 
Novice World assumes that you have no 
real practical knowledge of ham radio, and 




W2NSD draws the winner of the Instant ICOM Sweepstakes. 



this "let's start from the beginning" tone is 
what a lot of Novices have been searching 
for. ICOM is currently the leader in provid- 
ing equipment for the "Enhanced Novice/' 
and Novice World is an attempt to further 
solidify that position. The text is sprinkled 
with references to ICOM's full line of gear 
for the Novice, but the sales pitch is low- 
key and explanations of basic practices and 
technical matters are brandless. Novice 
World 'is FREE and to get it all you have to do is 
write to: ICOM's Novice World, c/o ICOM 
America, Inc., 2380 116th Avenue NE, 
Bellevue WA 98004. 



Its Big 



AS PROMISED last month in QftX, details of 
73*s new contests, The National Champi- 
onships (September 5-6), are available on 
page 30. We've finally made it possible for the 
"Little Gun" to have a chance at winning— us- 
ing guile instead of gigawatts. The rules are 
complicated, so read them carefully and de- 
vise a strategy. For a complete set of entry 
forms, send a SASE to The National Champi- 
onships, 2665 Busby Road, Oak Harbor WA 
98277. 

A Few Good 
OMs/YLs 

73's CONTEST PROGRAM is rapidly ex- 
panding (as you may have noticed from the 
preceding two stories). We have immediate 



openings for a contest chairman, an awards 
manager, and a public relations manager. If 
you are interested in becoming part of 73' s 
contest coordination team, drop a note to Bill 
Gosney KE7C, 2665 Busby Road, Oak Harbor 
WA 98277. 

Scout Skeds 

BOY SCOUTS AND GIRL GUIDES from the 
province of Ontario will be exposed to am- 
ateur radio at Future Challenge r 87, a one- 
week program of high-tech experiences de- 
signed to allow our youth to experience this 
very important aspect of their future. Fu- 
ture Challenge "87 will be held from August 
16-23 at Conestoga College in Kitchener, 
Ontario. The Future Challenge *87 ham sta- 
tion will operate as VE3SHQ using all bands 
and modes: the packet system can be 
reached @ VE3EUK. The organizers would 
like amateurs to contact VE3SHQ to encour- 
age the Scouts/Guides to explore the world 
of amateur radio. If you'd like to set up a 
sked, write to: Future Challenge '87, c/o Gerry 
Curry VE3MAX, RR #1, Millgrove, Ontario 
LOR 1V0 Canada. 

Summertime 

VISITORS to the offices of 73 are always wel- 
come, and because we're located in such a 
beautiful vacation spot, faithful readers start 
dropping by once the weather warms up. 
Work on our new $7.3 million visitor center 
continues on schedule, but we appear to be 

73 Amateur Radio • Jury, 1987 7 



having soma trouble getting the full-size 
replica of Victoria FaMs to work. But seri- 
ously, folks, we've just put together a brand- 
spanking-new, state-of-the-art station, and if 
you want to drop by and operate for a few 
minutes with a signal that'll knock your 
socks off, come on up. Don't drive all the 
way from Dubuque just for our five-min* 
ule tour, but if you're in the area, please 
stop on in. In the photo you can see our new 
Sommer multiband HF beam being hoisted 
into place. Five minutes after this photo was 
taken it was discovered that the thrust bearing 
at the top of the tower was just a little tiny bit 
too small. 



PO Boxing 



KENWOOD USA has moved. Yeah, yeah. I 
know we told you that last month, but since 
then the U.S. Postal Service has informed 
Kenwood that the address Kenwood has been 
giving out is incorrect. The correct mailing 
address for Kenwood is: Kenwood USA Cor- 
poration, PO Box 22745, Long Beach CA 
90801-5745. 

Smoking Gunns 

CHUCK HOUGHTON WB6IGP called to 
say that those of you who are searching 
for Gunn diodes for 10 GHz need look no 



Cleveland Institute 

of Electronics 

AtctrcWMl M*fTiE#f National Hom# Shtfy CoOfKi 





CIE is the world's largest independent 
study electronics school* We offer ten 
courses covering basic electronics to 
advanced digital and microprocessor 
technology. An Associate in Applied 
Science in Electronics Engineering 
Technology is also offered. 

Study at home — no classes, Pro 
grams accredited and eligible for VA 
benefie 



OcvcLokJ Immure ut ElrtinMitt* 

1776 Eui I7ih Si.. Cfcvebnd. Ohio 44114 

YES' I w.inl i& get started. SenJ mc m> CIE school 
^.■nlog innluJic^ ikiaili jKhjt rhr Amocuic Degree 
prugtam. 



State. 



Apt>- 



Prinf Nam? ^^^^_ 

Address 

< :.rv . 

Are Area (.iKJWPhi.mc NU» 

Check box kit GJ. Bulletin on Educational Benefit* 

QVamti D Active Duty MAIL TODAY! 

AAK79 




for the ridiculously low price of $5 each 
postpaid. 



What new station would be complete without a 
new tower and antenna system. W2NSD's lat- 
est toy is a Sommer multiband HF beam sixty 
feet up. 



further. Chuck, the author of 73's on- 
going "Microwave Building Blocks" series 
of articles, says that he has a large supply 
of these diodes and he'll part with them 



for your 

FREE 
CATALOG 

DIAL 

1-800-426-2653 
or write: 

CABLE 
DISTRIBUTORS 

116 MAIN HW 
WASHINGTON, AR 71862 



Address 



WE'VE RECEIVED a request from a reader 
who is having trouble getting in touch with one 
of our authors. James L» Patterson DAI GY/ 
KB5LF, author of "CB to Six" in the February, 
1985, issue, is apparently no longer at the 
address listed in his article. If anyone knows 
his current whereabouts, please send that 
information to: 73 Magazine, WQE Center. 
Peterborough NH 03458, Attn: QRX. We'll 
pass it along. 

Chuck Update 

CHARLES E. MARTIN F/AB4Y, former 73 
staffer whom we last heard from as CM A in 
Maputo, has surfaced in Paris. Chuck is editor 
of The Bugle, newietter of the Paris Interna- 
tional Amateur Radio Association, ff you're 
going to be in Paris, drop a note to: Chuck 
Martin, CPU A-316, APO NY 09777. 

Keep f em Coming 

PLEASE SEND your news stones and photos 
to 73 Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough 
NH 03458, Attn: QRX. 



WE STOCK: 



AEA, ALINC0, AMP SUPPLY CO., 
ARRL PUBLICATIONS, ASTR0N, 
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Credit Allowed For Toll Calls 



ClftCLE 1S7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

6 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



CIRCLE 267 ON 



SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 149 ON REAOER SERVtCE CARD 



New FL-4 UHF 
Helical Resonators 

Installed in Receiver 

or FL-4H Preselector Unit 



Spectrum Repeater/Link 

High Performance Boards & Sub-Assemblies 



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FortOM, 2M f 220 MHz, & 440 MHz 



ID250A CW ID 
& Audio Mixer Board 

•improved! Now includes 'audio mute" 
circuit and "Emergency Power ID" 
option. 

•4 input AF Mixer & Local Mig, amp. 
•PROM Memory— 250 bits/channel 
•Up to 4 different ID channels! 
•Many other features. Factory programmed. 



COMPLETE SHIELDED RCVR. ASSY, 
VHF & UHF Receiver Boards 

SCR20GA-VHF SCR450A-UHF 

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•Sel, -6dB @ ± 6.5 KHz. -130dB @ ±30KHz. (8 Pole 
Crystal + 4 Pole Ceramic Fltrs. 

•*S Meter\ Discriminator & Deviation Mtr. Outputs! 

•Exc- audio quality! Fast squelch! wrt>.Q005% Crys- 
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• New! 30 KHz B. W. IF Filter 
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Complete Receiver Assemblies 

•Rcvr. Board mounted in shielded housing. 
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SO 239 conn. 
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FL-4H 




Receiver Front-End Preselectors 

•FL-6; 6HI O Resonators with Lo-Nolse Transistor 

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•FL-4H: 4 Hi Q Helical Resonators & Lo-Nolse Jr. 

Amp. in shielded housing, (420*470 MHz) 
•Provides tremendous rejection of "out-of- 

band" signals w/out the usual loss! Can often be 

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•Extremely helpful at sites with many nearby trans* 

miners to 'filler-out" these oul-of-band signals. 



Call or Write for 
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CTC100 Rptr. COR Timer/Control Bd. 

•Complete solid state control for rptr. COR /'Hang 1 * 
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Power Supply Boards IW 




SCP12 12VDC@0.3AMAX.OUT. 
SCP512 3 2VDC@ 1A&5VDC® 0.4A out. 
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SCP51 2A As above, but also w/- 12VDC # 0.1A 




Plug-in 
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TTC300 TOUCH TONE CONTROLLER 

•High performance, Super versatile design, To con- 
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•Uses new high quality Xtal Controlled Decoder IC, 
w/h igh ?m rn u n i ty i o f al si ng 

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basically I -dig it as with competitive units 

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Improved SCT41 0B 
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SCT1 1 VHF Xmtr/Exciter Board 

• 10 Wts. Output, 100% Duty Cycle! 

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filter & rel. pwr. sensor. 
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SCT1 10 Transmitter Assembly 

•SCTf 10 mounted in shielded housing 
•Same as used on SCR 1 000 & 2Q00X 
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SCT410B UHF Transmitter Bd, or Assy. 

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RPCM Board 



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SCP30 HEAVY DUTY 30 AMP 
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1 3.8 VDC out. 1 1 5/230 in T 50/60 Hz. 
30A @ 70% duty, 25A @ 100% duty. 
Massive 30 lb. Transformer & Heai Sinks. 



►Used w/SCAP board to provide "Reverse Patch 
and Land-Line Control of Repeater 
Includes land-line "answering" circuitry 



Lightning Arrester For Autopatch 

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When You Buy, Say 73" 



CIRCLE 51 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




EVER SAY DIE 



from page 4 

ago and we haven't come up with 
anything much of value since 
Pity P for before that we were on 
one heck of a roll— with FM, NFM f 
SSB, DSB* circular polarization, 
parametric amplifiers, flying noise 
lock, SSTV\ a rash of RTTY devel- 
opments, moonbounce, meteor 
scatter, and so on. We made 
smoke in the 50s. 

On the one hand as I tune the 
bands I hear you griping up a 
storm over the rotten QRM. bitch- 
ing and moaning about the mess 
on 20 meters, grumbling about 
lists, pileups, and contests. On 
the other we have zi llions of mega- 
hertz completely unused in our 
microwave bands — our 50-MHz 
band is almost vacant— we are us- 
ing 220 MHz so little Uncte Charlie 
wants to give 40% of it away to the 
first group that asks for it, We have 
several technologies we could de- 
velop to greatly reduce interfer- 
ence on our few crowded bands — 
such as double sideband with 
synchronous detection, a technol- 
ogy which should allow us to ac- 
commodate about ten times as 
many voice contacts in a given 
band. Until we know more about 
digital voice we don't know how 
many contacts we might be able 
to squeeze using it T but the esti- 
mate is another ten times— and 
with much less QRM than today. 

By breaking voice communica- 
tions down into phonetics and us- 
ing a digital code for each phonet- 
ic, the Japanese have been able 
to store a surprising amount of 
voice on a compact disc Make a 
wild guess as to how many hours 
of voice they're able to put on a 
CD. Make a guess. Sorry — you 
didn't even come close. They're 
putting 14-months of 24-hour-a- 
day voice on one disc. Using this 
technology we may be able to nar- 
row a voice band to 25 Hz. This 
would allow us to have 100 times 
as many contacts in the same 
band, yet with far less QRM. 

About the only thing we know 
for sure is that we are 24 years 
behind in technology instead of 
leading it, as our rules suggest we 
do — and as we were doing until 24 
years ago. SSB was developed by 
hams— was pioneered by hams — 
and then, after hams demonstrat- 
ed what it could do, it was finally 
accepted by the military. That was 

10 73 Amateur Radio * July, t987 



30 years ago — almost time to stop 
bragging about it. 

With pulse-code-modulation 
(PCM) so widely used in tele- 
phones, we can easily get the 
PCM chips we need to see what 
we can do about at least moving 
amateur radio up into the 70s. 
Now they've got adaptive differen- 
tial PCM {ADPCM) chips which 
exploit the predictive behavior 
of analog speech and cut the 
transmission rate in half. So, 
while voice technology is moving 
ahead, here we are, still grabbing 
our mikes, just as we did 60 years 
ago, and cursing the QRM. We Ye 
as stick-in-the-mud about holding 
onto ancient voice technologies 
as we are with the code. Amateur 
radio has become an amusing 
window on the past— a museum 
piece, Yes, horse-and-huggy 
communications still exist, just 



while GE* Motorola and the other 
destroyers circle our sinking ship. 

THE USUAL BAD NEWS 

The old cliche that good news 
doesn't sell papers seems to 
guide the ham newsletters— or is 
it that there just isn't much good 
news to report? 

For example, a recent WSYI 
Report included such lovely items 
as the Los Angeles ham who's 
made a career out of broadcasting 
obscene language over a local 
repeater— a ham arrested for jam- 
ming an FBI repeater— and the 
March licensing statistics. 

The arrested ham, I'm sure all 
Morse-code fanatics will be excit- 
ed to learn, was Extra class— fur- 
ther bolstering the growing con* 
cern that code makes people 
crazy and high-speed code makes 
them extra crazy. A well-known 
psychologist has been research- 
ing amateur radio for several 
years attempting to refute this 
proposition, but so far he has not 
been able to find any provable ex- 
ceptions. As he said when inter- 



"Hey, what's that odd noise? 
Hmmm, might be RTTYorSSTV. 
let's jam it, just in case. " 



check out 20 meters — the low end 
for code and the high end for a 
caterwauling of voices. I'm look- 
ing for smoke signals around 
14.250. Hey, what's that odd 
noise? Hmmm. might be RTTY or 
SSTV . . . let's jam it, just in case. 

Surely, out of the almost 
150,000 amateurs who we think 
are still even slightly active, we 
must have one somewhere who's 
been trying out some digital voice. 
How about rt? Is there one? 

How do you feel about all this? 
Should I stop grumbling and just 
tell you how great you are? How 
wonderful our hobby is? What a 
fantastic job we do in handling 
emergencies? How up to 25 years 
ago we were on top of everything? 
Or are you interested in articles on 
new technologies? Would you ac- 
tually read an article on a PCM 
unit? On an ADPCM? I can write a 
lot more about digital audio tape 
(DAT), if you're even remotely in- 
terested. Would you prefer me to 
lead the orchestra as our ship 
sinks — or work like hell to get the 
pumps going? It's your call— you 
tell me what you want. 

I think I know the answer, so I'm 
looking for a nice baton to wave 



viewed recently, a visit to Dayton 
would completely convince even 
the most demanding skeptic. 

The March FCC licensing sta- 
tistics showed that amateur radio 
was, just before the Novice En- 
hancement announcement, still in 
a tailspin, in comparing the num- 
ber of new Novices in March 1 965, 
1986 and 1907. the FCC figures 
showed that they dropped 20% in 
1986 over 1985, but were down an 
astounding 50% in 1987 over 
1986! 

Well, what about Novice up- 
grades? 94% upgraded in 1986, 
while only 43% upgraded in 
1987. An anomaly, right? No, it 
seems a consistent pattern. The 
percentage of Technicians who 
upgraded in 1986 was 84% vs. an 
incredible 37% in 1987. The 
Generals dropped from 90% up- 
grades in 1986 to 41% this year; 
Advanced was 39% this year 
and overall the drop was from 
91% in 1986 to 41% in 1987. Got 
the picture? 

So there you have it— the num- 
ber of new licensees dropped to 
half of las! year and the number of 
upgrades was only 41% of last 
year. Even the most optimistic 



Polly annas have to admit that 
something's wrong. 

BAD LANGUAGE 

This business of insisting that 
the FCC define the limits of bad 
language is an exercise in ped- 
antry. Just as there is no way to 
exactly define "quality"— there is 
no way to exactly pin down bad 
language and bad taste. Yet, like 
quality, we sure know it when we 
see it — or hear it. 

Of course one of the problems 
involved with defining bad Ian- 
guage has to do with the leaping 
upon definitions by fanatics — 
zealots. There's no way to satisfy 
a fanatic. Hell, I get angry letters 
from readers who object to "heir 
in my editorials. They get offend- 
ed by words which long ago have 
been admitted to family reading. 

On the other end of the spec- 
trum are fanatics who insist on 
exercising their so-called First 
Amendment Rights to make ass- 
holes of themselves on the air 
and f in the process, offending 
the hell out of almost everyone 
Listening. 

My suggestion is this— if you 
have someone in your community 
who is a consistent offender of 
your sensibilities, why not gather 
a group of the offended and visit 
the offendee? You'd sure get to- 
gether to help some ham who 
needed help for some other rea- 
son—such as a handicapped 
ham, right? So why not get a 
group to work for the good of your 
local community? 

Some hams offend us on the air 
as a way to get attention — others 
don't know any better, . .or don't 
care. The two hams I know of who 
were arrested, convicted, and put 
in prison for bad language on the 
air were both Extra-class hams, so 
I suppose they might have a Legiti- 
mate excuse— the code made 
them crazy. 

Fortunately most Extras can 
be spotted by their weird calls — 
and avoided, Perhaps someone 
should petition the FCC to make it 
illegal for an Extra to retain a nor- 
mal call, preventing him from hid- 
ing his shame in sheep's clothing, 
so to speak. 

One aspect which should be 
researched is whether the brains 
of Extra-class hams who lose 
their ability to copy code through 
neglect ever return to any sem- 
blance of normal. Does high- 
speed Morse permanently scram- 
ble the brain, or can the brain, if 
left alone, repair itself in time? 

Continued on page 55 



Put More Punch 



in Your Packet 



Outstanding mechanical design 
makes the IsoPole the only logical 
choice for a VHF base station, 
especially for Packet operation. All 
Isopole antennas yield the maximum 
gain attainable for their respective 
lengths and a maximum signal on the 
horizon. Exceptional decoupling from 
the feed line results in simple tuning 
and a significant reduction in TVI 
potential. The IsoPole antennas are 
all impedance matched in the factory 
so that no field tuning is required. The 
Iso Poles have the broadest frequency 
coverage of any comparable VHF 
base station antenna. This means no 
loss of power output from one end of 
the band to the other, when used with 
SWR protected solid state 
tranceivers. Typical SWR is 1,4 to 1 or 
better across the entire band. 

A standard 50 Ohm SO-239 connec- 
tor is recessed within the base sleeve 
(fully weather protected). With the 
IsoPole you will not experience ag- 
gravating deviation in SWR with 
changes in weather. The impedance 
matching network is weather sealed 
and designed for maximum legal 
power. The aerodynamic cones are 
the only appreciable wind load and 
are attached directly to the support (a 
standard TV mast which is not sup- 
plied). 



IsoPole Specifications 

Model 

Freq> Coverage (Mhz) 

2.1 VSWR bandwidth 

Power Rating 

Gain** 

Radiating Element Length 

Amateur Net Price 




High Performance Hand-Held Anten- 
na — The Hot Rod 

The Hot Rod antenna can be ex- 
pected to make the same improve- 
ment to hand-held communications 
that the IsoPole antennas have made 
to base station operation. Achieve 1 or 
2 db gain over ANY 5/8 wave two 
meter telescopic antenna. The factory 
tuned HFM is 20% shorter, lighter and 
places far less stress on your hand- 
held connector and case. It will easily 
handle over 25 watts of power, making 
it an excellent emergency base or 
mobile antenna. In the collapsed posi- 
tion, the Hot Rod antenna will perform 
like a helical quarter wave. Three Hot 
Rods are available; HR-1 1/2 wave 2M 
Ant., HR-2 for 220 Mhz, and HR-4 for 
440 Mhz. Amateur Net Price on all Hot 
Rods is $19,95. 

For either base station or hand-held 
operation AEA has the perfect 
VHF/UHF antenna. Put more punch in 
your Packet station with an AEA 
IsoPole or Hot Rod antenna. To order 
your new antenna contact your 
favorite Amateur Radio Distributor. 
For more information contact Advanc- 
ed Electronic Applications, P.O. Box 
O2160, Lynn wood, WA 98036, or call 
206-775-7373. 



144 220 440 

135-160 210-230 415-465 
)12Mhz @ 146Mhz >15Mhz @ 220Mhz >22Mhz @ 435Mhz 

1 kw 1 kw 1 kw 

3 dbd 3 dbd 3 dbd 

125.5" (3.2m) 79,25" (2m) 46" (1.2m) 

$49,95 $49,95 $69,95 



* * 



dbd — db gain over a dipole in free space 



Prices and Specifications subject to change without notice or obligation 



AEA 



Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 

CIRCLE 65 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



' When You Buy. Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radto • July, 1987 11 







ETTERS 



AVAST, YE HAMS 



] 



\ have been active on the ham 
bands for ten years, never trans- 
mit obscenities, music, or busi- 
ness there, and am welhhoughtof 
as an operator, from what I hear, 
There's only one problem: I don't 
have a license. Never have and 
never wilL 

I've been a bootlegger since 1 
was fifteen, and I like being a 
bootlegger. I don't have to fool 
with QSL cards, I don't know a 
single character of Morse, and I 
do not have to perpetuate a fraud: 
that amateur radio is a public 
sen/ice, 

Furthermore, if by chance the 
Rooskies or a home-grown Idi 
Amir* takes over (yes, Virginia, it 
can happen here), I will not be be 
rounded up and shot as a poten- 
tial spy or subversive. Finally, if 
the FCC nails me on one of my 
SWBCB pirate broadcasts, I have 
no ticket to pull. 

There are a lot more like me. At 
least twenty percent of the people 
I work aren't in the Calfbook. (Yes, 
I have one. And I know better than 
to work as WTAW. K7UGA, 
W6SAI, or anyone else in there.) 

Let's face it: making people 
learn Morse these days is like 
requiring airline pilots to demon- 
strate the ability to lash the valves 
and time the mag on an OX-5. 
That's why we're bootleggers. 

I am not so dumb as to believe 
that there are not all sorts of blue- 
and brown-nosers out there who 
would like to bust me. Somewhere 
out there is a League-Of-Decency 
type with a surplus ADF just wait- 
ing to get me in trouble — but I'm 
prepared. Even though I'm the 
very model of decorum, I never 
transmit from my house and I 
use different calls, as needed, 
Incidentally, I found your articles 
a few years back on busting jam- 
mers and other assholes quite 
useful. 

Maybe I'll see you on 40 — but 
don't expect a QSL card. 

The Olathe Buccaneer 
West of Olathe KS 



obstacle to licensing and our 
public service responsibilities 
are being ignored— but whether 
these faults justify breaking the 
taw is your decision . , , and your 
risk. However, if you're as good 
an operator as you ciaim to be t 
t*m not going to turn you in. 
—KA1MPL 



SCOFFLAWS 



I feel that responsible editors 
and publisher of ham radio 
magazines should 100% support 
lawful and legitimate ham radio 
operations. In a democracy, a 
citizen has a responsibility to obey 
laws and if he does not agree with 
them he is perfectly entitled to 
protest and to work for legitimate 
and legal changes through the 
system. 

The word for those who do as 
KW10 proposed ("Have a Nice 
Day/" Letters, December, 1986) is 
scofflaws I hope that not one of 
our ham radio leadership will 
place himself above Ihe law and 
promote unlawful activity. 

By staying within the law ham 
radio has prospered over the 
years, and as far as I know, very 
few have profited by unlawful 
opposition to the rules of the 
game. 

Joe Mehaffey K4IHP 
Atlanta GA 

KWtO went beyond the bounds of 
propriety in encouraging an indi- 
vidual to become a bootlegger, 
but I think thai editors have a duty 
to write the truth as they see it. not 
as the taw defines it, We also have 
a responsibility to provoke 
thought and promote change, 
when we think it is necessary, t 
think you left your description of a 
how a democracy works unfin- 
ished: if, after protests and 
attempts for "legitimate and legal 
change* faff on deaf ears, a 
citizen has a right and respon- 
sibility to disobey an unjust taw. 
—KA7MPL 



Ifs always nice to hear that our 
articles are helping people out. 
Your assessment of ham radio*s 
problems is largely correct — 
Morse code is an unnecessary 

12 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



PRAGMATIC IN PR 

Recently there have been ru- 
mors that licenses have been sold 
to individuals who were not quali- 



fied to have them. Whether or not 
this is true t it is obvious that there 
are many new voices on the bands 
with very little knowledge of ama- 
teur radio operating procedures 
and customs. 

In the past, most of us (myself 
included) have given the cold 
shoulder treatment to those who 
show interest in ham radio. Being 
basically lazy, we seen to forget 
that when we started there 
was somebody to help us out 
(WA2VCG. in my case). 

Because new candidates to this 
hobby aren't able to find the help 
necessary to iearn all they need to 
know to get a license, they are 
more easily swayed to take an 
easier route to get their license. 
Money, 

There is always somebody will- 
ing to take a chance to make a 
buck. The point is that these newly 
licensed "candidates'" are just 
starting out. They, too, need help 
to become knowledgeable ham 
operators. We need to hetp any- 
one, licensed or a candidate for a 
license, who needs help. If we 
don't start right now we're going 
to have a great big mess, which 
may be the end of a very interest* 
ing hobby. 

Jim Meyers KP4BE 

Juana Diaz PR 



That's the spirit* 



—KA1MPL 



CHEAPSKATES 



As a ham. 1 am appalled at the 
lack of response other U.S. hams 
have shown toward John WM4T 
and his call for financial assis- 
tance to help recoup the losses 
from his landmark legaf battle with 
the local authorities concerning 

PRB-1 . 

It is downright shameful that a 
supposedly cohesive group of 
hobbyists known as amateur radio 
operators would ignore such a 
plea. Are so many hams willing to 
let someone else pay $7,000 + out 
of his own pocket to defend their 
rights? If only one ham out of 
every thirty contributed $1, his 
expenses would be completely 
reimbursed. Surely $1 is a small 
price to pay to ensure one's own 
rights, 

John showed a lot of courage in 
standing up for his rights— the 
same rights that entitle you to 
operate your station. Help him 
out— he deserves it! 

Richard Stuart W06P 
El Cajon CA 



Jtaff 



PUBLISHER 
Wayne Green W2NS0/1 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 
Siuan Norwood 



MANAGING EDITOR 
Chris Schmidt KA1MPL 

PRODUCTION EDITOR 
JewetiKAiMPM 



INTERNATIONAL EDITOR 
RiChard Phenix 

COPV EDITORS 

Robin Florence KA1PNR 

Bryan Hastings KAtHY 

ASSOCIATES 
MikeSrycfiWeavGE 

John Edwards K 12 U 

QdlGosneyKE7C 

Jim Gray W1XU 

Chod Harris VP2ML 

Dr Marc Leavey WA3*JR 

Andy MaeAlltster WA5ZIB 

BiH Pastemafc WA6JTF 

Harold Price NK6K 

Paler Putman KT2B 

Mike Stone WBflQCO 

Dr Ralph Taggart WB8DQT 



ART DIRECTOR 
Dianne Ritson 



ADVERTISING 
1-603-525 4201 
1 800-225-50a3 

SALES MANAGER 
Nancy Ciampa-Maliette 

ADVERTISING SALES 
JimGodronNtEJF 

SALES SERVICES MANAGER 
Hope Currier 



WGE PUBLISHING, JNC, 

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHING 
jimConrwR 

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 
Rchard Yee 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
David P. Raelhor 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Pater M. Gaviorno 

TYPESETTINGS AGINATION 

Boo Duketie, Linda Drew, Susan Aflen 

GRAPHICS SERVICES 
Richard Clarke. Manager; 
Sue B. Flanagan. Dan Croteau 
Deborah Smith 



Editorial Offices 

WGE Center 

Peterborough. HH 03458^1 1 S4 

603-525-4201 



Wayne Green E nterpn&es is a division 
of International Data Group 

73 Amateur Radio (ISSN 0745080X} 
is published monthly by WGE Publish- 
ing, Inc., a division of Wayne Green 
Enterprises, inc . WGE Comer, Peter- 
borough NH 03458-1194 Entire con- 
tents © 1987 by WGE Publishing. Inc 
No part of this publication may be re- 
produced without written permission 
iromi he publisher 



Matching Pair 



TS-711A/811A 



TheTS-711A 2 meter and theTS-811A 
70 centimeter all mode transceivers 
are the perfect rigs for your VHF and 
UHF operations. Both rigs feature 
Kenwood's new Digital Code Squelch 
(DCS) signaling system. Together, 
they form the perfect "matching pair" 
for satellite operation* 

Highly stable dual digital VFOs. 

The 10 Hz step, dual digital VFOs offer 
excellent stabitity through the use of a 
TCXO (Temperature Compensated 
Crystal Oscillator). 

Large fluorescent multi-function 
display. 

Shows frequency, RIT shift, VFO A/B, 
SPLIT, ALERT, repeater offset, digital 
code T and memory channel 

40 multi-function memories. 

Stores frequency, mode, repeater off- 
set, and CTCSS tone, Memories are 
backed up with a built-in lithium battery 



VHF/UHF all-mode base stations 





Versatile scanning functions. 

Programmable band and memory scan 
(with channel lock-out). "Center- stop" 
tuning on FM. An "alert" function lets 

you listen for activity on your priority 
channel while listening on another 
frequency A Kenwood exclusive! 

RF power output control 

Continuously adjustable from 2 to 
25 watts. 



• Automatic mode selection. 

You may select the mode manually 
using the front panel mode keys. 
Manual mode selection is verified in 
International Morse Code, 

• All-mode squelch. 

• High performance noise blanker. 

• Speech processor. 

For maximum efficiency on SSB 
and FM. 

• IF shift, 

• "Quick-Step" tuning. 

Vary the tuning characteristics from 
"conventional VFO feel" to a stepping 
action. 

• Built-in AC power supply. 
Operation on 12 volts DC is also 
possible. 

• Semi break-in CW, with side tone. 

• VS-1 voice synthesizer (optional) 

MoreTS-7T1A/811A information is 
available from authorized Kenwood 
dealers. 







Optional accessories, 

IF-10A computer interface 
IF-232C level translator 
CD-10 call sign display 
SP-430 external speaker 
VS-1 voice synthesizer 
TU-5 CTCSS tone unit 
MB-430 mobile mount 



• MC-48B 16-key DTMF, MC-43S UP/ 
DOWN mobile hand microphones 

• SW-200A/B SWR/power meters: 
SW-200A 1,8-150 MHz 
SW-200B 140-450 MHz 

• SWT-1 2-m antenna tuner 

• SWT-2 70-cm antenna tuner 

• PG-2U DC power cable 



• MC-60A t MC-8Q,MC-65 

deluxe desk top microphones 

Complete servtce manuals are available for aff Trto -Kenwood transceivers and most accessories 
Specifications and prices are subject to ctwnge without notice or obligation 



KENWOOD 

KENWOOD U.S.A. CORPORATION 

Communications & Test Equipment Group 
2201 E, Dommguez St., Long Beach. CA 90810 




EW PRODUCTS 




Santec's docking booster for their ST-2QT/ST-200ET NTs. 



DOCKING BOOSTER 

Naval Electronics makes a 
Docking Booster for the Santec 
ST-20T/ST-200ET hand-held 

transceivers. The Docking Boost- 
er turns the ST-20T into a power* 
ful mobile unit with 30- or SO-Watt 
output. Receiver sensitivity is also 
boosted through a low-noise 
GaAsFET preamplifier (16 dB), 
The booster is designed to attach 
quickly to most car doors and it 
provides connections to the car 
battery and the outside antenna. It 
also comes with mike hangup clip. 
For further information, circle 
number 21 \ on your Reader Ser- 
vice card. 

ICOM 1C-90Q 

ICOM has introduced a six- 
band fiber-optic mobile transceiv- 
er. The "band units" are remotely 
controlled via a compact control 
unit. The compact controller, 
which measures only 2.9" x 2" x 
1", can be placed in any conve- 



nient location near the operator; 
the band units can be placed in 
some other spot in your vehicle 
(such as the trunk). The band 
units are connected to the con- 
troller by a fiber optic cable to 
eliminate rf feedback, 

Among the features of the con- 
trol unit are: 10 memories, two 
scanning systems (for memory 
and programmable scan), and 
crossband operation. Band units 
are available for 2 meters (25/ 
45W), 10 and 6 meters, 220 and 
440 MHz, and 1 .2 GHz. 

For more information on the IC- 
900 or other ICOM products, see 
your local ICOM deafer, 

MINI BEAR" 
CAT SCANNER 

Engineering Consulting has 
just released The mini "Bear" Cat 
scanner for the FT-727R and the 
Commodore 64 computer. This in- 
terface allows for the program- 
ming of the Yaesu FT-727R at 





4800 baud The entire contents of 
the radio can be loaded in under 
15 seconds. All parameters are 
stored and and up to ten sets of 
channels {ten each) can be 
scanned, all at once or individual- 
ly, information can be saved to 
disk, which allows 100 channels/ 
disk. There is scan lock-out for in- 
dividual channels, and scan 
speed and resume times are ad- 
justable. All transmit and receive 
frequencies plus offsets and en- 
code/decode subaudtble tones 
can be input and loaded into the 
radio on command. Return data 
from the FT-727R provides a full- 
screen digital S-meter which may 
be used to stop the scan on pre- 
set signal strengths from S1 to 
S9 There is a comment field for 
each channel entered, and it is 
displayed while scanning. All in- 
formation for each channel pro- 
grammed (in groups of ten) is 
simultaneously displayed on the 
monitor, Once the channels are 
entered via the computer key- 
board, the information in any of 
the ten frequency groups may 
be downloaded to the HI for 
portable use. 

The model 727S is supplied 
with hardware and software to op- 
erate with the Commodore 64/ 
64C/1 28/3X64 series. The hard- 
ware interface includes the circuit 
board, components, cables, in- 
structions, and connectors. As* 
sembly time is about 10 minutes. 
The kit is priced at $39.95. 

For more information about the 
mini "Bear" Cat scanner, circle 
Reader Service number 208- 

S-COM "5K" 
REPEATER CONTROLLER 

S-COM Industries has added 
the "SK" to its fine of repeater 
controllers. The CMOS micropro- 
cessor design supports both a re- 
peater and a control receiver and 
requires only 60 rnA at 12 V dc 
Applications include control of 
main* site repeaters, remote re- 
ceiver links, portable repeaters, 
and emergency repeaters. 




The S-COM "5/f M repeater con- 
trotter 

Operating parameters are re- 
motely programmable via DTMF 
commands. Data is retained in 
nonvolatile memory. Three logic 
inputs and three logic outputs are 
provided for site control and moni- 
toring purposes. 

Features include CW shaping, 
a watchdog monitor* flexible re- 
peater interfacing, a CW clock 
and calendar, DTMF muting, se- 
curity passwords, a "polite" iden- 
tifier, transient protection, and 
power MOSFET outputs. Options 
include full IC socketing, rack- 
mount cabinet, wall-mount power 
supply, and audio delay module. 

For more information about S- 
COM repeater controllers, circle 
number 218 on your Reader Ser- 
vice card. 

QFAX-1 WX FAX 
RECEIVE TERMINAL UNIT 

Quay Technologies has an- 
nounced the QFAX-1 Weather 
Facsimile Receive Terminal Unit. 
QFAX-1 is a microprocessor-con- 
trolled intelligent interface unit de- 
signed to be connected between 
an SSB receiver with LSB recep- 
tion and a low-cost computer 
graphics printer (such as Epson's 
FX-80 and compatibles). Opera- 
tion has been made simple for the 
non-technical person. 

The terminal unit itself is pow- 
ered from 12 V dc at under 0.5 A, 
availing it to mobile and marine 
application (it comes with a 
mounting bracket), 

For further information on this 




tCOM's tC-900 6-band mobile transceiver. 
14 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



Quay's weather facsimile receiver terminal unit 



product, please circle number 207 
on your Reader Service card. 

CSI PAGING ENCODER 

Communications Specialists, 
Inc., now has available a rack* 
mounted version of the their PE- 
1000 Paging Encoder. Called the 
PE-1000RM, this new encoder 
may be mounted in a standard 
19" rack. Like the desk-top model, 
the RM is capable of 100- or 1000- 
call paging capacity in the two- 
tone sequential signaling formats. 
Five-tone sequential and REACH 
formats are also available. All fea- 
tures are included in every unit 
and are fully field-programmable 
through the front-panel keyboard, 
Programmable features include, 
but are not limited to, code plan 
and group selection, group call 
duration of tone and delay tim- 
ing, choice of alert tones, and 
automatic page. A nonvolatile 
memory retains trie programming 
if a power loss occurs. All stan- 
dard Motorola and General Elec- 
tric groups are included in every 
unit; non-standard tones from 
250 Hz to 400 Hz may be spe- 
cially ordered, An output for 
printing a hard-copy record of all 
paging activity is provided, and an 
automatic self-test is run each 
time the encoder is powered up. 
The PE-1000RM is available for 
$324.95. 

For more information on the PE- 
1000RM Paging Encoder, please 
circle number 209 on your Reader 
Service card. 

HL-37V 

COMPACT AMPLIFIER 

Tokyo Hy-Power Labs intro- 
duces the HL-37V, a compact am* 
plifier designed for 144-MHz FM/ 
SSB hand-held and portable 
transceiver operation. The unil 
has a built-in variable-gain RX 
preamp which uses a low-noise 
GaAsFET. The HL-37V will allow 
you to enjoy comfortable DX 
QSOs by expanding the commu- 
nication range limit of hand-held 
radios. 

The front panel has a smoked 
polycarbonate sub-panel so that 
the LEO lights can be recog* 
nized only when they are lit. Com- 
bined with an HT, the HL-37V will 
boost power to 30 W output from 
2-3 W input (rf driving input of 
0,5-5 W is accepted). It has a 
low spurious signal emission with 
an effective output low-pass fil- 
ler, The built-in RX GaAsFET 
preamp allows a noisy and weak 
signal to be received more clearty. 
Gain is continuously variable from 
-20 dB to +40 dB. There is an 




The rack-mounted paging encoder from Communications Specialists, 
Inc, 



LED power-level indicator on the 
front panel. The FM/SSB mode 
select switch is on the rear pan- 
el The changeover from RX to 
TX has a delay of about 1 sec- 
ond on SSB so that the relay does 
not chatter. 

Suggested list price is $99.95 
Further information may be ob- 
tained by circling number 210 on 
your Reader Service card. 

HF-LINK HARDWARE 
AND SOFTWARE 

Wald-Easterday Associates, 
Inc., released its HF-Link line 
of hardware/software products 
which allow the amateur radio 
operator to control the Yaesu 
FT-980 and the FT-757GX HF 
transceivers. These new prod- 
ucts are designed to interface 
with the Atari 8-brt family of mi- 
crocomputers so that the user 
can control these two transceiv- 
ers with a standard joystick, and 
eliminates the need of manual- 
ly typing operating commands 
on the computer. These products 
also provide the user with an 
on-screen graphic depiction of 
the transceiver's operational 
status and include such features 
as: scan for memory channels 
at user-determined rates, rapid 
production and updating of sta- 
tion logs, unlimited storage of 
log and memory channel data on 
disk, and the use of the fire 
button to key the transceiver's 
transmitter. 

To find out more about this 
product, circle number 213 on 
your Reader Service card, 

ANTENNA ELEVATOR SYSTEM 

Gten Martin Engineering is in- 
troducing the Hazer model H-3 for 
use with the Rohn 20 and 25G 
towers. The Hazer is an elevator 
system that will raise and lower an 
entire antenna system up and 
down the tower safely and conve- 
niently. The H-4 Hazer is heavy- 
duty, with a wind-load rating of 
up to 16 sq. ft, tt comes com- 
plete with all hardware, a winch, 
cable, and necessary brackets. 
Price including UPS delivery is 



$273. GME also supplies rotors 
and thrust beahngs. For a com- 
plete catalog or more information, 
please circle Reader Service card 
number 219. 

MIRACLE FLUX 

Specially designed for solder- 
ing dissimilar metals and alu- 
minum. This flux provides good 
electrical connection when sol- 
dering NiCd batteries or alu- 
minum to copper For mechanical 
strength, combine miracle flux 
with fluxless miracle rod. 

For more information on this 
flux, circle Reader Service card 
number 215. 

SUPER NiCd's FOR ICOM HTs 

Periphex has released NiCd 
battery packs for ICOM HTs. The 
Super NiCd BP-7S is rated at, 
13.2 V, 900 mA— double the ca- 
pacity of the ICOM BP-7 lor IC-02/ 
03/04AT 5-W output. The Super 
BP-8S is rated at 9.6 V, 1200 
mA— 50% more capacity than the 
ICOM BP-8 for IC-2/3/4AT and 
IC-02/03/04AT. Both are base- 
charge only, with the BP-7S using 
the BC-35 and the BP-8S using 
either the BC-30 or BC-35. The 
price for either unit is S60 + S3 
shipping 

For further information on these 
units, please circle number 21 2 on 
your Reader Service card. 

BUTANE ENERGIZED 
SOLDERING IRON 

Eaglestone's butane-energized 
Portasol cordless soldering iron 
eliminates the need for battery 
recharging, It measures 7" long x 
1/2" dtameter. heats in seconds, 
and offers adjustable heat output 
equivalent to 10-60 Watts. Its 3- 
oz. body allows easy lip control 
and eliminates fatigue, 

Portasors protective cap con- 
tains a built-in igniter which, with a 
flick of the thumb, energizes the 
catalytic tip This tip glows or- 
ange-red, does not flame, and is 
operational in less than thirty sec- 
onds. Non-electric, Portasol is 
static-free. 

Filled by a butane cartridge. 




The Hazer elevator system lower- 
ing a 40-merer beam. 




Pertphex Super NiCd's for ICOM 
HTs. 

Portasol gives an average of 
60 minutes of cordless soldering. 
It arrives ready-to-use. equipped 
with a 2.4mm tip; 1 2mm, 3.2mm t 
and 4.6mm tip sizes are available. 

Portasol is priced at $30 plus S2 
for shipping and handling. Addi- 
tional lips cost $8.50 each. 

For more information, please 
circle number 21 4 on your Reader 
Service card. 

CABLE AND 
CONNECTOR GUIDE 

Nemal Electronics International 
has released its Cable and Con- 
nector Selection Guide, Th*s 36- 
page guide includes more than 
100 new cable and connector 
products covering a wide array of 
rf coaxial, microwave, broadcast, 
communications, and data appli- 
cations. Extensive cross-refer- 
ences and illustrations allow the 
user to easily select I he appropri- 
ate cable, connector, and tooling 
for any application 

To find out more about the ca- 
ble catalog, please circle Reader 
Service number 217. 



7$ Amateur Radio • July. 1987 15 



& 




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• RIPPLE Less than 5mv peak to peak (lull load & 
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• Altt it lililli will EZO VAC ilpil tlltlfl 




MODEL RS-50A 




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RM SERIES 



19" x 5V4 RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 




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RM-12M 

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RM-50M 



Cllfitilts 

Oitf [Alps) 
9 
25 
37 

9 
25 
37 



its- 

(A«pl| 
12 

35 
50 

12 
35 

50 



Siziimi 

HxWxD 
51* x 19 x 8< 
5% x 19 x 12V* 
5V4 x 19 x 12^ 



m x 19 x 8 1 /4 
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Ilip|ii| 

Wt. fill.) 
16 



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MODEL RS-7A 



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RS-35A 

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Cailinuoii 

Dilf |Aap&) 

2.5 

3 

4 

5 

5 
7.5 

9 

9 

16 

25 

37 



ICS" 

|Anps] 
3 
4 
5 
7 
7 
10 
12 
12 
20 
35 
50 



Size [IN] 

H x W x D 

3 X 4% X §* 

3* x m x 9 
3Vz x 6Vi x 7% 

3fa x 6V? x 9 
4 x Vi 2 X 10 a /i 

4 x vh x \m 

4ft X 8 X 9 
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5 X 9 X Wk 
5X 11 X11 

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Swi tenable volt and Amp meter 

RS-12M 

Separate volt and Amp meters 

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Ditr |Anps| 

9 

16 
25 
37 



ICS* 

|Aapsj 

12 

20 
35 
50 



Sin [IN] 
H x W x D 

4Vz X 8 X 9 

5 X 9 x W-i 
5x11 X 11 

6 X 13** X 11 



Shippiij 
Wt. (III.) 

13 

18 
27 
46 



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to Full Load 

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@1&8VDC @10VDC @5VDC @J3JV 

VS-12M 9 5 2 12 

VS-20M 16 9 4 20 

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Sizt (IN) 

HxWxD 



Slippii| 

wt. [li».| 



AVi X 6 X 9 
5 X 9 X 10Vj 
5x 11 x 11 



13 
20 
29 



VS-50M 



37 



22 



MODEL VS-35M 



Variable rack mount power supplies 
VRM-35M 25 15 

VRM-5QM 37 22 



10 



7 
10 



50 



35 

50 



6 X 13^4 X It 



5* X 19 X 11 

5^4 X 19 X 12? 



48 



38 
50 



RS-S 




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Bum in speaker 

MODEL 

KS-7S 
RS10S 
RS-12S 
RS-20S 



ConlinooiS 
Duly (Amps) 

5 
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ICS' 

Anp i 
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10 
12 
20 



SiZftjIN) 

H x W X D 

4x7^x10^ 

4 x7ft XlOtt 

4& x 8 x 9 

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73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 17 




Yaesu FT-290R II 144-MHz 
Mobile/Portable Transceiver 



Tonna F9FT 9-Element 
144-MHz Portable Yagi 



Yaesu USA 
17210 Edwards Road 
CerritosCA 90701 
Price Class $580 



by Peter H, Putman KT2B 




Photo A, The Yaesu FT-290R It configured for mobile operation with the FL-2025 amplifier. 



This review is dedicated to all of those 
jaded two-meter operators who've 
reached the end of their ropes and think the 
thrill is gone on 144.200 MHz, Surprise! I've 
come to tell you that the thrill is back {and then 
some)t 

The Yaesu FT-290R II multimode transceiv- 
er offers base/mobile operation with 25 Watts 
and portable operation with 2.5 Watts. The 
Tonna 9-element 144-MHz portable yagi re- 
quires no toois to assemble and breaks down 
in minutes for easy transportation. Together, 
they make a very compact and efficient sta- 
tion, ideal for mountaintoppmg, portable/ 
emergency operation, or just lying in a ham- 
mock and making a few SS8 contacts while 
sipping a cold drink. Here is a package that 
weighs in at less than 10 pounds and offers full 
two-meter communications flexibili- 
ty . portable packet, FM, CW and SSB DX, 
and of course repeater operation. 

The FT-290R II 

We'll start with the FT-290R II, but first a 
little historical background is in order. Many 
readers no doubt recall the earlier FT-290/ 
690/790 series radios. These nifty units ran 
about 3 Watts output on FM/CW/SSB. with 10 
memories and a self-contained battery pack. 
They made their appearance in the U.S. mar- 
ket in the eariy 1980s but didn't seem to sell 
all thai well here (based on conversations 
I've had with Yaesu dealers). I'm not sure 
why T because they offered a very nice combi- 

18 73 Amateur Radio • July. 1987 



nation of power to weight as well as long bat- 
tery life. 

At the same time the radios sold like hot- 
cakes in Europe! In fact, I saw an ad East year 
In the RSGB magazine which claimed that 
f \ , Jhe FT-290 is the most popular 2-meter 
radio of all time." There must have been a 
reason for it, and that reason became obvious 
shortly: Grid Squares. Yep, stations in Europe 



'The Tonna is designed 

to be assembled with 

the most common toot 

on the face of the 

earth: fingers. " 



were buying 290s and 790s (for 70 cm) and 
going grid square hopping, 290s were also 
finding favor as low-power mobile stations; 
many accessory amplifiers were bought for 
this purpose. 

Times have certainly changed on this side 
of the Atlantic— grid squares have become the 
rage, and so it would seem that the U.S. mar- 
ket is wide-open for small portable VHF 
transceivers, Yaesu must have been thinking 
the same thing, and it didn't take long for the 
ads for the 290R/690R to catch my eye. Being 



Tonna Antennas imported by; 

The PX Shack 

52 Stonewyck Drive 

Belle Meade NJ 08502 

Price Class: $60 




Photo R The FT-290R U configured for 
portable operation with a rubber duck and an 
FBA-8 battery pack, 

one of those incorrigible backpacking VHF 
types, I knew I had to get one to review soon. 
(And Yaesu was more than happy to oblige 
me, sending afong one of each and a few 
battery packs as well?) 

There are several different ways that the 
290R ll is shipped, but I assume my sample 
was representative: It came with the core ra* 
dio/control head, heat sink/power amplifier 
module, dc power cord, and mobile bracket. I 
also received a rubber duckie antenna with 
the baste package — it wasn't immediately 
useful and Til touch on that momentarily. With 
this setup, you're ready for 25 Watts of SSB/ 
CW/FM operation from your car or base sta- 
tion. The heat sink/power amplifier combina- 
tion snaps on with two latches to the back of 
the control head assembly (see Photo C) t and 
the dc leads are attached to a suitable power 
source. 

An RCA plug delivers low-level rf of about 
2.5 Watts to the final amplifier, Three gold- 
plated contacts deliver control voltages and 
sample the ALC level, and a screw post de- 
presses a spring-loaded switch to keep the 
front-panel iight on while in use. The contact 
mechanism appears to be very solid and reli- 
able, and the two spring latches on either side 




Photo C. View of the modular connections 
between the control unit and the power amp 
(shown) or battery pack. 

ensure a positive locking frt. You just make 
your antenna connection (standard SO-239), 
apply 13.8 V dc at about 5 Amps, and away 
you go! 

Back to that duckie. The FT-290R II is easily 
configured lor portable operation by removing 
the heatsink assembly and snapping on the 
accessory battery pack (FBA-8) which will 
hold 9 NiCd or alkaline cells, depending on 
your preference. You then install the duckie 
antenna or other antenna of your choice to the 
front-panel BNC connector. But you don't get 
the battery pack with the radio! It *s an optional 
accessory, So why include the rubber duckie? 
(Unless you want to take a motorcycle battery 
and operate a real heavy-duty QRP station. Of 
course, once you've purchased the FBA-8, 
things work very well with the rubber duck, 
Things work even better with a quarter-wave 
antenna, and best of all with a beam, But Pm 
getting ahead of myself.) 

The control layout of the FT-290R II definite- 
ly falls into the "simple" category, as Yaesu 
went light on belts and whistles. Basically, you 
have controls for volume, squelch, cfarifier 
(RIT), and a big tuning knob. There are also 
several dual-function push-buttons to select 
the two vfo's, any of the ten memories, the 
desired mode, repeater offsets or simplex op- 
eration, high or low power, priority channel, 
and scanning operation. With these controls, 
you can program independent mode, offset, 
and frequency information into any channel. 

The front panel has definitely been "human 
engineered/' as the largest controls are the 
ones you use most often-vofume. squelch, 
and tuning/memory select. The display is a 
soft green, but the bulb intensity leaves a bit to 
be desired in mobile operation. Incidentally, 
the bulb switch is nol engaged when the bat- 
tery pack is snapped on, so as to prolong 
battery fife. If you need to engage the switch 
momentarily, or even lock it on, you can do so 
with a recessed twist-switch on the battery 
pack. Good thinking, Yaesu, 

Now. with the battery pack in place, you 
have a radio weighing about 4 pounds which 
sizes up at roughly 6" wide X 7 3/4" deep X 2 
1/4". Small enough for you? Incidentally, the 
sizes are the same with the power amplifier 
assembly. Speaking of the power amplifier, 
here's a neat twist: You can attach four screws 
through the back of the mobile bracket and 
attach It to the heat sink/amplifier permanent- 
ly. Then, just release the two side latches and 
snap on the battery pack when you arrive al 
your portable location. When finished, remove 
the battery pack and slide the control head 
back into the mobile bracket and reattach the 
latches. Piece of cake! 




Photo D. The Tonna 9-element portable 2m antenna Fully assembled. Note the T match and the 
square-boom construction, 



Let's take a look at the front-panel controls 
again. There are ten of them-nine main con- 
trols and a yellow shift button. The vfo key 
toggles between vfo's A and B, while with the 
shift control this key initiates a programmed 
memory scan between band limits defined in 
memories 1 and 2 — exclusive of mode. The 
key marked mr enables the ten-position mem- 
ory selection. Shifted, it actuates a selected 
memory channel as a priority channel while in 
the vfo mode. A key is provided for large fre- 
quency stepping up or down using the shift 
key, Repeater offsets of -600 or +600 kHz 
are provided, or you can split the vfo's for an 
odd offset with the rpt swtich. The step key 
determines tuning speed (typically 25, 100, or 
2500 Hz in SSB/CW; 5, 10, or 20 kHz in FM). 
Shifted, it chooses low or high power, low 
being typically about one-tenth of high. 

Finally, a reverse key is provided for listen- 
ing on repeater inputs. This key also actuates 



the optional FTS-7 Tone Generator Unit. The 
mode key is self-explanatory; when shifted, it 
turns the noise blanker on and off. The last key 
is the memory imput key, used both when pro- 
gramming and when setting the "skip-scan" 
feature up (wherein selected memories can be 
locked out of scan mode), 

So — now that I had this nifty transceiver all 
loaded up with fresh batteries. I needed three 
things: (1) A contest. No problem there as J 
opted to try out the FT-290R II during the 
ARRL 1 44 MHz Spring Sprint on April 13. (2) A 
good location. Again, no problem. I settled on 
the Catfish Fire Tower near Catfish Pond In 
the KIttatiny Mountains of western New 
Jersey, about 1500 feet ASL (3) A portable 
antenna. This looked to be a problem as I was 
growing weary of tearing my 4-element KLM 
yagi apart and reassembling it over and over 
again! (So was the antenna!) However, help 
came from a nearby source, as Ivars Lauzums 

73 Amateur Radio * July. 1987 19 



FT-290R II PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 






Specification 


Claimed 


Measured 


Minimum Discernible Signal 


n/a 


-130dB 


Sensitivity 








10dBS/N 


.2 uV SSB/CW 


.25 uV SSB/CW 




12dBSinad 


,25uVFM 


.25 uV FM 




Squelch Law 








| SSB/CW 


n/a 


,2uV 


FM 


n/a 


-2uV 




Selectivity, -6/-60dB 








FM 


12/25 kHz 


1 5/25 kHz 




SSB/CW 


2,4/5,2 kHz 


2.5/6 kHz 




Sensitivity S9 M 


n/a 


5 uV. SSB/CW/FM 




Power Output (W) 








w/FL-2025 amp 


HI25/L0 5 


Hi 25/Lo 5 




w/FBA^e&NiCds 


HJ2,5/Lon/a 


Hi 2.8/Lo A 




Current Drain (A) 








W/FL-202S 


Hi 8 max. 


Hi 6 






Lon/a 


Lo3 




w/FBA-8 


Hi 1.1 


n/a 




Receiver Current Drain (mA) 


80 


120 






Photo E. The Tonna breaks down into a neat 
package — the only toots needed for assembly 
are your fingers. 




Photo G. The portable station setup at 1500 
feet— the moon is rising in the east 

KC2PX of the PX Shack offered the use of one 
of his Tonna 9-element portable yagis, model 
#20089. 

The Tonna 

This unassuming antenna is designed to be 
assembled with the most common too! on the 
face of the earth: fingers- Clever selection of 
boom stock and element material has resulted 
in a high-gain lightweight yagi for virtually any 
use on 2 meters. The elements have two 
notches on them-one at the end and one in 
the middle. The latter serves to center the 
element before you secure it to the boom. The 
former keeps it from falling out of Its retaining 
clip when you collapse the yagi for portable 
operation, 

Tonna employs the same feed system as is 
used on their 13- and 17-element yagis with a 
T-match sealed in plastic, A type N connector 
is standard and a decoupling sleeve is provid- 
ed which also secures the coaxial cable feed. 
Assembly time is extremely short— 20 min- 
utes if you work methodically, 10 if you don't. 
Broken down tt lakes up very little space, with 
three sections and the driven element all fit- 
ting inside a canvas tent stake bag about 3 
feet long. The disassembled antenna is 
shown in Photo E, Incidentally, the three 
boom sections are coded with both green tape 
and an inked-on arrow to indicate the correct 
mounting direction when reassembling. 

Tonna claims an isotropic gain of 13.2 dB 
for this antenna, with the IronHo-back ratio 
specified at 19,8 dB. This latter figure is about 
what I expected for a 9-element yag». (The 
assembled boom length is 1 1 .5 feet.) The -3- 
dB be am width is also fairly broad at about 40 
degrees. The F/B ratio is tolerable for contest 
mountatntopping (considering the weight and 
ease of assembly). Remember that strong lo- 
cal signals running high power can be your 
biggest problem when youVe mountaintop- 
ping— this is especially a problem here on the 




Photo F. Ait loaded up and ready to climb — the 
radio is inside the backpack. 




--• *'*-■•*> jLi 



Photo H. Cbse-up of the operating position* 

East Coast. (I could have sharpened the front 
pattern up a bit by stacking two of these, but 
would have the extra weight and masting to 
contend with — not worth it 

The boom material is the same as used on 
the 9-element conventional Tonna yagi, but 
the clamps are different for the elements. I 
couldn't see a real problem with using the 
antenna permanently; the brackets appeared 
to be plenty strong enough. 

As mentioned earlier, you only need fingers 
to assemble the yagi, but keep a 10mm 
wrench handy to attach the beam to the mast 
of your choice. The supplied brackets will ac* 
commodate up to 2" mast material. I opted for 
the lightest, cheapest TV masting around— 
20-gauge 5-foot sections from Radio Shack. 
(Remember, the point here is to save weight 
whenever possible!) Using my time-tested 
low-profile anchor and lightweight 1/8" nylon 
rope, I was able to come up with a very 
portable mast arrangement weighing under 
10 pounds. 

Up, tip, and Away 

And off t went with the FT-290R II, a keyer, 
logbook, fluorescent lantern, canteen* and 
two S* pieces of TV masting. A few odds and 
ends in the pack rounded out the list, including 
my camera, some snacks, and extra warm 
clothes for the mountaintop, I decided to get a 
warm meal before tackling the climb, which 
straddles the Appalachian Trait, The 
mediocre weather conditions earlier in the day 
showed signs of improvement as I headed 
west, and the sun broke through as I arrived at 
the trailhead at 7 p.m. 

It took about 15 minutes to load up the 
equipment and backpack, and the hike to the 
top was accomplished in 20 minutes. I killed 
another 20 minutes or so setting up the anten- 



na- baseplate, and guy ropes. The entire in- 
stallation appears in Photo G, with the moon 
rising to the east. Photo H shows the guts of 
the station— FT-290R, MFJ keyer, lightweight 
phones, clock, camp light, and a ground pad 
to park my rear end on. 

At 8 p.m. KT2B/2 QRP burst onto the air- 
waves with an astounding 2.5 Watts, being 
careful to slay away from 144,200 MHz so as 
to improve the chances of making contacts 
through all that QRM. By 8:30 p.m. I had 
worked 1 5 stations in 4 grid squares-not a bad 
rate for QRP! The temperature was dropping 
rapidly as the cloud cover moved away, mak- 
ing for spectacular and chilly views of the 
moon rising, I put on a few more layers of 
clothes and dug in, working 32 contacts and 6 
more new grids during the next hour. Reports 
were spectacular! Everyone liked the audio 
quality (many refused to believe I was running 
anything less than 100 Watts) and signing 
. .portable QRP" brought more than a fair 
share of quick replies. 

I finished my last hour of participation with a 
flourish, bagging 19 more QSOs and 3 addi- 
tional grids, including a 400+ mile QSO with 
VE3ASO in FN 15 (central Ontario) on SSB! 
(That ought to convince skeptics of the poten- 
tial of ORP on VHF>) I should add that condi- 
tions were average. No enhancement was ob- 
served from my mountaintop QTH. I wound up 
making all of my QSOs on SSB, as 1 had to 
wear gloves due to the cold and couldn't oper- 
ate the buitt-in microswitches on my keyer 
accurately. Despite all of this, I finished with 
66 QSOs and 1 3 grid squares. 

It was a simple matter to break everything 
down; the antenna came completely apart in 
about 10 minutes. I stuffed everything into the 
backpack and slid the antenna sections into 
slots on my pack used for cross-country skis. 
On the way down the path, I did have a prob- 
lem with elements sliding out and hitting my 
legs or the ground, hence the suggestion to 
secure the elements with rubber bands, When 
I arrived at the car \ detached the battery pack 
inserted the control head back into the brack- 
et, locking up with the power amplifier mod- 
ule. Presto! Back on 2-meter FM mobile for the 
trip home (and an occasional SSB contact 
here and there}. 

Now, that is truly a painless operation. You 
could travel lighter than I did, but I've gotten 
used to 30-40-pound packs with extra support 
gear in them when I hi the hills. This setup 
would lend itself well to the summer contest 
schedule, especially during the ARRL June 
and September VHP QSO Parties (where a 
separate QRP entry exists) and the CO World- 
wide VHP WPX in July (also in the QRP or 
Portable classes). The trick here is to use a 
good gain antenna with your QRP signal and 
the Tonna fits the bill perfectly , (By the way, tor 
those of you who are REALLY ambitious, Ton- 
na also makes a 13-element version of this 
antenna, they claim 14 dB gain and 27 dB F/B 
ratio on a 14-foot boom.) You should also use 
the lowesWoss coaxial cable possible. RG-6/X 
works surprisingly well in short runs, and rep- 
resents a good balance between weight and 
signal attenuation. Remember, the total feed- 
line run from the 9-element yagi on a 10-foot 



20 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



mast is (ess than 20 feet. RG-8 works some- 
what better if you don't mind the added bulk 
and weight. 

In the Lab 

Finally, the bench test results. I was very 
impressed with the front end on the FT-290R 
during actual operation, especially during 
pileups near and on 144.200 MHz, (Yes, I 
actually ventured onto the calling frequency, 
which is like riding the interstate on a bicycle 
during rush hour!) The usual measurements 
were taken, excepting dynamic range and 
compression point, It would appear that the 
latter figure is in excess of at least dB, based 
on observations in the field. 

The hysteresis in the squelch circuit is a bit 
spongy, and it takes almost as much signal to 
open it in SSB/CW mode as it does to produce 
10 dB S/N ratio. A similar situation existed in 
FM, and in fact many times the squelch will not 
open when no signal is present, even if the 
control is set to absolute minimum sensitivity 
(e.g., no squelch) while in the FM mode. On 
the other hand, it doesn't take muGh signal to 
open it at that point, so it isn't a problem. 

I wish the lamp was a bit brighter on the 
display, especially when mobiling at night. 
Compared to the FT-290R, my Alinco ALR206 
display looks like a neon sign on Broadway! I 
suspect this is a result of trying to save current 
drain on the batteries when the lamp is used. 
The 1-Watt audio output stage may be 
strained a bit if you operate in a noisy environ- 
ment, but in discussions with Yaesu this again 
is a function of current consumption and 
speaker size. I just keep the volume control up 
to 80% of maximum setting while mobiling 
and that works fine. 

Conclusion 

No doubt about it, Yaesu has a winner here. 
I haven't had this much fun on VHF in years. 
The combination of a mobile radio and 
portable shoulder-slung radio all in one pack- 
age makes it hard to beat, and the receiver 
performance is better than average for the 
design. The choice of C cells for the battery 
pack will result in longer operating time (I took 
two packs for the 144 MHz Sprint and barely 
exhausted one of them in 2-1/2 hours) and 
that means you can have more fun sitting on 
mountaintops at night in cold weather trying 
to work rare grids like I dtdi Seriously, the 
battery fife is probably on the order of 4-6 
hours per pack, assuming about a 25% duty 
cycle (SSB/CW). 

The Tonna 9-element 144-MHz portable 
yagi makes the perfect companion for the 
FT-290R, owing to its extremely light weight, 
strong boom construction, and simplicity 
of assembly. Its front-to-back ratio and gain 
figures are more than adequate for the simple 
QRP station, and the sealed, pretuned driven 
element is sufficiently broadbanded to cover 
all of the 144-MHz band with better than 
1.5:1 vswr, 

For more information about the FT-290R II, 
circle number 203 on your Reader Service 
card; for more information about the Tonna 
9-etement yagi, circle number 204 on your 
Reader Service card.H 



,_- New Features SlJDPP COITlSllQCk 64 More AdVfinced controls! 

Repeater Contralfer/Dual RemoteXRutopateh/Shack Control 



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*Autopatch fast access & speed dial tone or pulse 
*Program voice ID message/courtesy Deep from H.T. 

* Automatic voice clock & user program able timers 
^Multiple commands can be executed at once 

(up to 22 digits per command string) 

* CTCSS tone paging/voice paging/ 8 relay cont. opt 
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*Send control commands from any telephone! 

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•Senerates random cods practice @ any speed with 

voice readbacsc alter each 20 random code group! 
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Autopatch Specifications 

*300 Toucmone/ parameter loadable autodial 
numbers, mc: 1 Emergency (quick access) 

*30Q Reverse oaten call signs voice paged with 
CTCSS activated/general & directed page modes 

* Incoming caller receives vo;ce message to enter 3 
digit code to selective pace a call sign ( D.R. mode) 

^Two autopatch: access codes-Hi/Lo priority access 
^inafc-e/ehsable 50 number strings + wildcard *"s 
*FuM or half duplex ( repeater on/off);TT muted 
storage of MCI /Sprint access codes + delay digits 
*Call waning allows switching to second call 
*Touchtones are regenerated onto the tel. /speed dial 
*CTCS5 paging group/ individual or reverse paten 

* Reverse patch active in al! modes 



-\r 



Dual Remote Base Specifications 

*H.F CAT remote; Yaesu FT-757/767/9S0 

Kenwood TS- 440/940, I com !C- 735 
*2nd remote: Yaesu FT-727/FT-767CUHF & VHF); 
Kenwood 61 1/7 1 1 - serial oara ... or use 7950 
TS- 2530/70 with RAP 1 ( row £ col. control card } 
* 10 H F Memory channels/enter or recall 
*Automatic LiSB/LSB/FM/AM mode select 
*Scan up/down , fast .slow or \ OOhz steps 
*Control C5- 6 relay/latch /master reset /Status 
*H.F / 2nd remote: Monitor only, or 1% enable modes 
*A11 control inputs are voice confirmed including 
frequency, mode, scan status, time, outputs on/of f 
*VHF remote, as fink input, & repeater can be active 
System Potions 

*3 Latching Relay contro) ; Mode 1 CS-S $79,95 

+ 3 DPDT 2A relays, 5 open collector outputs 
* user defined 2 letter function name & state 
+ automatic PTT fan control /master all off coce 
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+ Ham Tl rotor interface Model hm- 1 $49-95 
optional CMOS auto- boot 72k EPROM Cartridge 

programed with your parameters $99.95 

*Keypad Control for VHF remote; RAP l ..$ 1 49.95 
* Super ComShack Manuel (credit later) ....$ 1 5.00 

C model C564S S549.95 (wired and tested}) 

includes.' computer interface, disk 1 , cables & manual , 
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f Commercial version also available 

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Module installs inside ihe radio *n 15 MifK Boost audio to 
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* Scans u D to 1 00 chonrofe at once oy sending freq. data to the radio. 

*Program digital "5" meter; scan stops from SC 1 -9), Auto resume 
*Proqram 100 channels; including offsets, subtones, TX T RX,& 
ail FT- 727R keyboard commanos- iave all sets to disk & print out. 

* Loads & programs all FT-727R parameters in less that 15 seconds. 
* Includes hardware interface and disk forth-eC-M 



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Repeater on/off Master control 

W ■ ^ed and tested + 5 to + 1 2 Volts/ 
User programable to 50 ,000 codes/ 
All 1 6 digits/ Sand code once to turn 
on. again to turn off/ Momentary & 
Latching output/drives relay /LED 
latch indicator /Optional 4 digit extra 
custom latch iC's £8.95 eacn/addas 
many latches as you want to your 
external board [node'. TSD $59.95 



Remote- A- Pad Two TSD's( above) and 
Row & Column control interface; all 
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Toucntona Decoder Kit M957 

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tt 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 21 



The SuperSCAF From AFtronics 



AFtronics, Inc- 

PO Box 785 

Longwood FL 32757-0785 



by Jim Tfwmpson W4THU 



HP 



LP 



SUPER 
SCAF 



D 3 2 4 



POWER 
ON 

m. 

OFF 



FILTER 

IN 

OUT 



PHONES 




Photo A, The SuperSCAF from AFtronics. 



Present-day receivers offer a diverse arse- 
nal of weapons for fighting GRM , Synthe- 
sized, multiple-conversion receivers feature 
distributed selectivity (multiple filters at differ- 
ent i-f frequencies), excellent gain distribu- 
tion, low noise, high dynamic range, unwaver- 
ing stability, variable bandwidths, passband 
tuning, skip© tuning, variable bio's, i-f notch 
filters, noise blankers, instant QSY, and QSK. 
All of this sophistication might lead you to 
expect little help from external accessories. 
The central question of this review is: "Can an 
outboard audio filter help a modern quality HF 
transceiver?" 

Advances in Audio Filter Technology 

Audio fitters or processors have come a 
long way. The day of the simple LC circuit is 
gone. Filters using banks of operational ampli- 
fiers and closely matched components may 
be breathing their last breath. Gone, too t are 
many of the problems that reduce the useful- 
ness of most conventional audio or baseband 
filters. The * 'ringing* ' and monotone monot- 
ony, long trademarks of narrowband audio fil- 
ters, are being eliminated. Digital techniques 
are now being used in audio filtering and 
processing. 

The SuperSCAF, available from AFtronics, 
Inc., is one such digital audio processor. A 
SCAF is a 'Switched-Capacitor Audio Filter. 
The SuperSCAF contains none of the compo- 
nents usually found in audio filters. There are 
no coils, op amps, or precision-matched com- 
ponents. The SuperSCAF has an over 150 
dB/octave rolloff It also has a 50-Hz-wide fitter 
to effectively cope with a busy CW band or 
pileup, If you want to find out more about how 
these filters work, refer to the article in the 
April, 1986. issue of QST. The article was writ- 
ten by Rich Arndt and Joe Fikes, who head up 
AFtronics, Inc. 

Building The SuperSCAF 

It would be unfair for me to say that this kit is 
for everyone. You need to be comfortable us- 
ing a low-wattage soldering iron and working 

22 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



with solid-state components. If you are new to 
kit building, I would suggest practicing on a 
scrap printed circuit board. Anyone who is 
willing to lake the time to follow the instruction 
manual carefully should have no trouble com* 
pleting the kit 

You will have to make your own cable to 
connect your receiver to the SuperSCAF. The 
input connector is a phono jack. The audio 
output from Ihe SuperSCAF is available from 
both the front and rear panel. A built-in audio 
amplifier has more than enough power to 
drive any headphones or speaker. 

One feature that is missing \s the ability to 
accommodate headphones with stereo phone 
plugs. This includes stereo headsets and Heil 
headphones, among others. You can over- 
come this problem with a mono-to-stereo 
adapter. You could also replace the Super- 
SCAFs single-circuit jack with a two-circuit 
"stereo" jack. The latter would be my choice. 
Plastic bags hold most of the kit's parts. If you 
cannot identify all of the parts, take the time to 
become really familiar with each component 
before you begin construction. Several pages 
of the manual are devoted to parts identifica- 
tion and proper soldering techniques This is a 
two- or three-evening project. The instruction 
manual is a real hand- holder and will carefully 
guide you through the PC board maze. 

Switch-Selected Filter Response 

The SuperSCAF provides separate tow- 
pass (LP) and high-pass (HP) fitters. Each is 
independently adjustable, and together they 
produce a bandpass response. The cutoff fre- 
quencies of each filter are switch-selectable in 
100-Hz increments from the front panel, For 
example, dial up "03" on the HP thumbwheel 
switch. The filter passes only frequencies 
above 300 Hz. Select "05" on the HP thumb- 
wheel and only frequencies above 500 Hz will 
pass through unattenuated, Select "30'* on 
the LP thumbwheel and only frequencies low- 
er than 3000 Hz get through the fitter. Since 
the LP filter was left set at 500 Hz, the Super- 
SCAF is now functioning as a bandpass filter 




Photo B. Inside the SuperSCAF. 

with a nearly flat response from 500 to 3000 
Hz. Above and below these selected frequen- 
cies, signals disappear quickly. If you prefer 
less high-frequency response, simply dial 
some tower number on the LP thumbwheel 
switch. If you dial "20 T \ for example, the filter 
response wilt be 500 to 2000 Hz. 

A Super CW Filter? 

An inherent calibration error exists in the 
SuperSCAF's HP fitter. The HP cutoff fre- 
quency is actually about 10% below the fre- 
quency indicated on the thumbwheel. I sug- 
gest taking advantage of this error to cre- 
ate a narrow bandpass filter. For exampte, if 
you dial in "04 1 ' into the HP thumbwheel, 
and "W into the LP thumbwheel, the 10% 
error results in a filter that is only 40 Hz 
wide, centered on 380 Hz. Dialing in "07" in* 
to the HP and LP thumbwheels will give you 
a 70-Hz filter bandwidth centered near 675 
Hz, However you set the thumbwheels, just 
remember to take into account the calibra- 
tion error in the HP fitter if you want to accu- 
rately figure your bandpass. The skirt selec- 
tivity is better than the CW crystal filter that 
is in your rig. 

Critical Listening 

Two transceivers, representative of a wide 
range of transceivers, were used to test the 
SuperSCAF. The primary transceiver was a 
Kenwood TS-9303, The first thing that I no- 
ticed is that the SuperSCAF. when in the "fil- 
ter out 1 * mode, was not as quiet as the audio 
system in the TS-930S itself. Switching the 
SuperSCAF to "filter in" eliminates the prob- 
lem. Unfortunately, the SuperSGAF's own 
audio amplifier is always in the circuit, My 
preference is to completely bypass the Super* 
SCAF's circuits when the filter switch is in the 
"out" position. 

The results were excellent. Reducing the 
LP cutoff frequency can really cut out interfer- 
ence from nearby stations. The effect is simi- 
lar to using the slope tuning controls on the 
TS-930S. but with somewhat better rolloff 
characteristics. 



To fully appreciate the SuperSCAF, you 
must use it on CW, where you take fuller ad- 
vantage of the narrowband characteristics. A 
filter with a 40-Hz bandwidth can be a real help 
when the QRM gets serious. With the Super- 
SCAF, it's a case of 'now you hear him, now 
you don't/ 1 It's surprising how much space 
exists between C W stations. To use this order 
of selectivity, your receiver must be absolutely 
stable and should have a stow tuning rate. 
Anotner curious characteristic is the improved 
signal-to-noise ratio that the narrow band- 
width provides. It seems easier to dig signals 
out of the mud. 

The results wjtb the TS-820S were similar to 
those from the the TS-9303, except for its own 
constant background hiss. Using the Super- 
SCAF with a moderate bandwidth ("0330" dh 
aled in on the thumbwheels) improved this 
nicely. Many of the filtering features now stan- 
dard on newer transceivers were not available 
ontheTS-820S. 

The project was easy to put together, and 
everything about it is first-class. The only 
problems I found were the "filter in/filter out*' 
switching scheme with its resultant back- 
ground noise and the mono-only jack. 

The filter's skirt selectivity is excellent and 
the thumbwheel adjustment of frequencies is 
very convenient. There is a worthwhile CW 
selectivity improvement, and improvement on 
SSB, as well. The SuperSCAF is an effective 
new weapon in the battle against QRM, 

For more information, circle Reader Service 
number 239. ■ 




The HAZER 
bringing the rotor 

and antenna down 
the tower. 




At last a convenient 
and safe way to 
install and maintain 

your beam. 





Never Climb Your Tower Again! 

Are you urtcomf (triable with heights? Has your doctor advised you not to 
climb? Do you want to be able to install or maintain your beam in several hours 
instead of several davs? 

If you answered YES to any of these questions then the HAZER is for YOU. 

Question: "When I buy a HAZER. what's included and whal eLsr will I n*ed?" 
AflSW©n The winch, table, pulley, bracket \, and hardware are all included. Optional 
thrust bearing and rotator are recommended. 



GLEN MARTIN ENGINEERING INC. 
P.O. Box 253, Dept 7 » Boonville, Mo. 65233 

816-862-2734 



CIRCLE 72 ON R£A0£R SERVICE CARD 



73 and ICOM present the 



Golden Gigahertz Contest 



JULY 13-14 

Official Rules: 

Operating Categories: Single operator; mulli-op- 
erator, single transmitter. 

Frequencies; Contest frequencies are 1260- 
1 300 MHz However, because of the large size of 
the band and the nature of microwave communi- 
cation we suggest that you check 1294,500 MHz 
(the national FM simplex calling frequency) ana 
1296,100 MHz {the national SSB/CW weak -sig- 
nal calling frequency) 

Modes: If it's legal on 1.2 GHz. it's valid for 'he 
GGC 

Exchange: Grid square and signal report (Grid 
locators are available from ARRL HQ j 

Scoring: Multipliers are grid squares. Repeater 
contacts count to increase QSO total but do not 
count as multipliers. Total Score = (Total OSOs 
x 5 x Multipliers) - Repeater Contacts - Re- 
peater Grid Squares. (See the entry form for 
more information ) 

Forms: Ptease fill out the attached coupon to re- 
ceive your official Golden Gigahertz entry form/ 
log sheets. PLEASE BE SURE TO INDICATE 
YOUR T-SHIRT SIZE AND LICENCE CLASS 
ON THIS COUPON. Mai! the coupon to Golden 
Gigahertz Contest, ICOM America. Inc., 2380- 
1 1 6th Ave. NE, Bellevue, WA 98004, 

Entries: Mail your completed log sheets to Gold- 
en Gigahertz Contest, 73 Magazine, WGE 
Center, Peterborough, NH 03458. Entries must 
be postmarked by August 31 , 1 987 Results will 
be printed in 73 Magazine. Decisions of the 73 
Magaztn^ Con I est Committee are final 



& 



ICOM America and 73 Magazine proudly 
present the first annua] Golden Gigahertz 
Contest. This 1.2 GHz contest will be held from 0001 
UTC July 13 through 2400 UTC Jtilv 14 ALL 
ENTRANTS WILL RECEIVE A FREE HAT AND 
T-SHIRT COURTESY OF ICOM. 



Please send me my Golden Gigahertz log sheets 
and my free hat and T-shirt. 



I Name: 



I 



I 

Address: 



City: 



State: 



Zip: 



Circle T-Shirt Size: 



Small 



Medium 



Large X-Large 



Circle License Class: Novice Technician General Advanced Extra 

Mail to: Golden Gigahertz Contest, ICOM America, lac, 
2380- 11 6th Ave. NE F Bellevuc, WA 98004 



'When You Buy. Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • July . 1987 23 



Phone Remote 5000 

by Jim Godron N1EJF 



CES 

803C S. Orlando Ave* 
Winter Park FL 32 789 
Price Class: $200 







PHONE REMOTE 



POftifl 



pimnt 



f*S *"' 



^ 



_, . 



014 HlU'c 

e 



BUST 



o 



TVMSMll 



MODEL SO DO 



! - 







The Phone Remote 5000 is a small device 
that allows you to connect any HF f VHF, 
or UHF radio to a touchtone™ telephone. The 
Phone Remote is not a phone patch and it 
doesn't allow your mobile station to originate a 
phone call, it allows you to operate your base 
radio on a preset frequency via the telephone 
when you're away from home. The Phone Re- 
mote doesn't allow you to control any 
transceiver function other than transmit and 
receive. Activity and push-to-talk timers are 
provided in case the phone connection is lost. 
The Phone Remote 5000A is a small unit, 
about 5-3/4" x 6-1/2" x 1-3/4". The front panel 
contains a power switch with indicator LED 
and three status LEDs marked off hook, busy, 
and transmit There are four cables coming 
from the rear of the unit. The phone line is 
terminated in a standard modular jack and 
can be plugged into any phone plug or ,f T 
adapter. The power line is a 2-conductor cable 
which is connected to 12 V dc and ground. 
When the external speaker line is connected 
to an external speaker, the Phone Remote will 



"The Phone Remote 

allows you to operate 

your base radio on a 

preset frequency via the 

telephone when you're 

away from home. " 



route the audio to the speaker when the 
Phone Remote is not in use. and mute the 
speaker when the remote is in use. The last 
cable is a four-conductor mike cable. A suit* 
able mike cable connector for your radio must 
be wired for ground, PTT, and mike audio. 

Programming 

The first thing to be programmed is the ON/ 
OFF code. When the code is pressed on the 



telephone touch pad, the Phone Remote unit 
will be turned on and off, The ON code is * 
followed by two digits; the OFF code is fol- 
lowed by the same two digits. A truth table is 
provided to make the setting of the Exposition 
DIP switch very easy. This code prevents 
unauthorized use of your radio. 

A ring counter is programmed so that the 
the Phone Remote unit will pick upon 1. 2. 6, 
or 10 rings. If the Phone Remote is on its own 
line, you may want to leave the unit at its 
factory programming of 1 ring. If the P^one 
Remote shares your home line, a 6- or tC-ring 
setting will let you beat the unit to the calf 

The PTT timer determines how long any 
one transmission can be. If the phone correc- 
tion is lost, the time set will be the maximum 
time before the unit drops out. The timer can 
be set for one t two 1 three, or four minutes. 

The activity timer tells the Phone Rerrote 
how long to remain connected to the phone 
line in the event that there is no activity on the 
touchtone pad. The unit will beep 30 seconds 
before it disconnects. The available times are 
3.5, 10, and 15 minutes. 

Operation 

The operation of the Phone Remote 
couldn't be simpler. If your transceiver is 
turned on, tuned, and ready to operate, all yoj 
have to do is dial the number that the phone 
remote is connected to. When the unit an- 
swers, you'll hear a beep. When you enter 
your ON code you'll hear the receiver audio, 
To transmit, key the * button, To receive* key 
the # button. Use the * and # buttons to switch 
between transmit and receive during the 
QSO, When you're done, enter your OFF code 
and hang up. That's all there is to it. 

Conclusion 

The unit that I tested functioned perfectly. 
Because I have two phone lines in my shack, I 
was able to hook the unit to one line and call it 
from the other. This arrangement allowed me 
to be present at the radio while I evaluated the 
unit. The unit is designed to be operated with- 
out a control operator physically present at the 
station, so care should be taken in deciding 
how I he unit should be used. The Phone Re- 
mote should provide years of service. 

For more information, circle number 205 on 
your Reader Service card ■ 




RFI KIT 

Use territe beads and loroids 
to keep RF out ot your 
TV, stereo, 
lone, 
etc. 



Frae catalog and interterence tip stieot on request 



P ALOMAR 



Box 455, Escondido. CA 92025 
Phone:(619)747-3343 



24 73 Amateur Radio * July. 1987 



IRON POWDERandFERRITE PRODUCTS 

AMID0IM . . 

Fast, Reliable Service Since 1963 



Small Orders Welcome 



Free 'Tech-Data' Flyer 



Toroidal Cores, Shielding Beads, Shielded Coil Forms 
Ferrite Rods, Pot Cores, Baluns, Etc. 

12033 OTSEGO STREET, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 91607 



CIRCLE A OH READER SERVICE CARD 




^l eZsorja/ized Uustorri C^rnhlot debet! 

HAM HAT 



Don't be a stranger at the next 
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Display your NAME, 
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Our caps have a white, 
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matching bill. They are one 
size fits all, with an adjustable back. 

Best of all, each cap front is CUSTOM 
EMBROIDERED in a color coordinated thread, 

Hats come in; ROYAL BLUE, RED, and BROWN 



7 



00 
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SEND: First and/or Last Name (max 14 letters) Call (maximum of 6 
letters) City and/or State (max 1 4 letters) 



Piease send check or money o rder , plus 
$3.00 shipping and handling per order. 
Add 50 cents S&H for each additional 
cap ordered. 




Cstnh'ioide'iy vvalehouse 



P.O. Box 1476 * Severna Park, MD 21 146 



AHow 4 to € weeks for delivery. Maryland residents add b% sales tax. 

WE WELCOME INQUIRIES FROM CLUBS 




For Computerists and Amateur Radio 




\ ^ ' l77' : ~» tf 



Why You Should Subscribe! 

Read what our subscribers say! 



CIRCLE 292 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




PHONE REMOTE 




MODEL 5Q00A 



OPERATE YOUR 

HOME BASE STATION EVEN 

WHEN YOU'RE NOT AT HOME 




i - •■■; . r-.;. ::: Mull 






(WEKSEL E4TOH 









PHONE REMOTE is an interface between 
your home base station and your home tele- 
phone line. If allows operation of your home 
base station from any touch tone telephone 
using the touch tone pad to control PUSH- 
TOTALK. PHONE REMOTE works with any 
transceiver, HF, VHF or UHF ACTIVITY and 
PUSHTQTALK timers are provided In case 
the telephone connection is lost. All opera- 
tional features are switch programmable. 




r TRt-H COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 

RO. Box 4076 
Winter Springs, FL3270B 



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73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 25 



Stone Mountain Engineering QSYer 

Stone Mountain Engineering Company 

POBox 1573 
Stone Mountain GA 30086 
Price class: $90 



by Bernard C. Herring Z2JEI 




The QSYer front Stone Mountain Engineering, 



The Yaesu FT757GX transceiver was in- 
troduced toward the end of 1 983 and pro* 
vided a number of attractive features in a 
small size. Highlights were a 100-Watt output 
on all HF amateur bands, provision for com- 
puter interfacing, dual vfo's, and scanning 
and memory systems. In addition, several 
items, normally options, were included in the 
package. 

Taking into account the reasonable price, 
it was not surprising that the FT-757GX at- 
tracted good reviews in the amateur press. 
But one criticism came up every time — the 
tuning rate is too slow. Typical comments 
were: *The tuning rate can be a bit of a pain," 
"A QSY of 250 kHz [is] somewhat labori- 
ous," and "Frequency changes [are] a te- 
dious business/" 

Well, l have been a Yaesu fan since the 
first FM01 S and who needed to QSY that 
fast, anyway? So I bought one, and a while 
later sat back, looked at the tuning knob, 
and thought* ''What this rig needs is a 
keypad." 

To banish any charges of bias, I had ac- 
quired a Sony ICF-2Q01 general-coverage re- 



ceiver a year or so before buying the 757. This 
Sony product relied entirely on keypad fre- 
quency entry, allied with up, down, and fast 
buttons. It wasn't long before I sat back and 
thought, "What this receiver needs is a tuning 
knob," 

I don't know the lead time between concept 
and production of a radio, but both Sony and 
Yaesu have recently produced later models 
employing both tuning knob and keypad. May- 
be telepathy works! 

FT-757GX owners don't have to look at new 
models to solve the keypad problem. A smart 
little device— the QSYer from Stone Mountain 
Engineering— wilt give them instant QSY facil- 
ities from 500 kHz through 30 MHz, 

The tuning knob retains its use for band- 
searching, but if you want a spot frequen- 
cy fast, the QSYer will find it for you in less 
time than keying up a phone number. In 
fact, the QSYer employs a standard tele- 
phone keyboard of 10 alphanumeric keys 
plus two control keys designated by a star (") 
and a pound sign (ft). The number keys en* 
ter numbers, the star is used as a decimal 
point, and the pound key transfers the numeri- 



cal value of the frequency to the 757 digi- 
tal readout. Thafs the slow way of entering 
frequency. 

The QSYer thinks for itself, and between 3 
and 30 MHz it will place the decimal point 
correctly without using the decimal key. Lead- 
ing and trailing zeros don't have to be entered 
either, so 14.2 MHz is entered as 142*, and 
the 757*s digital display will show 14 200,0, 
The tuning knob can be used to shift away 
from any frequency entered by the QSYer, 
Frequencies below 3 MHz do require use of 
the decimal key: 1 .8500.0 would be entered as 
1 *85tf. 

Physically, the QSYer is housed in an alu- 
minum box only 3-1/2" deep, 3" wide, and 2" 
high, finished in baked enamel that matches 
the 757 color scheme. The top of the enclo- 
sure, on which is mounted the light gray plas- 
tic keypad, slopes at T0 D just like a normal 
telephone keyboard. 

A 42" cable connects the QSYer to the 
rear panel of the FT-757GX. The cable ter- 
minates in two plugs: One connects to the 
data input port on the 757 (marked remote) 
and the other to the +8-V-dc or the + 13 5- 
V-dc jack. If connection between the 757 and 
the QSYer takes longer than 30 seconds, 
you* re spending too much time drooling over 
the joys to come! But, exercise care with 
the plug connection to the remote jack— the 
pins in the jack are easily bent! Once con- 
nected, the QSYer is ready for immediate use, 
and you'll wonder how you ever got atong 
without it. 

There are some useful bonuses with the 
QSYer, Frequency changing for the blind op is 
a snap; the long connecting cable allows the 
keypad to be placed where it suits your operat- 
ing convenience, 

Second, keypads that are built Into trans- 
ceivers are vertically mounted and the keys 
have to be "poked.'* The QSYer keys are 
"pressed/ 1 so you can avoid marking up the 
keys with your fingernails. 

And. for the musically minded, each of the 
number keys on the QSYer "bleeps" when it 
is pressed. These bleeps are on a rising scale 
from 1 to 0. The scale is near enough to the 
tonic sol-fa to play simple tunes — or even to 
compose? 

Any gripes about the QSYer? I don't think 
so. The price is right, and the installation 
guide is a model of clarity. Maybe a schematic 
of the circuitry could have been included, but 
there's not much more than a single micropro- 
cessor anyway, That's the QSYer, Try it — 
you'll like it. 

For more information about the QSYer, cir- 
cle number 201 on your Reader Service 
card ■ 



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26 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



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Torrestronics Universal Digital Frequency Readout 

Torrestronics* Inc. 

4850 Hollywreath Court 

Dayton OH 45424 

Price class: Kit $100 

Assembled $135 



by Adam W. Weiss WA1WMZ/2 




Photo A. The "listening area " at WA 1 WMZ/Z The Torrestronics digital display is the box at the 
tower right. 



] wners of rigs with analog dials, when 
asked about the efficiency of drgilaJ read- 
outs, usually respond with: "Anyone who 
can't read an analog dial doesn't have the 
mental agility of a well-used handball" and 
'They're safer; they won't go dead on you" 
and "Everybody knows that it II cost you a 
fourtune to update 1 * and "They've got no soul 
at all" (t have to admit some feeling towards 
that one). Digital displays are, in fact, easier— 
especially after a long day, Face it. It's a lot 
more efficient to be told, in effect, where you 
are rather than having to ask yourself, "OK, 
where am I?" 

Along with enjoying ham radio, I'm an 
avid shortwave listener and own, in my opin- 
ion, one of the finest "most for your mon- 
ey'* receivers made — the Yaesu FRG-7. I've 
made several modifications to it over the years 
and truly love it. it is definitely one of Yaesu" s 
better efforts to combine quality and pricing. 
The only thing that has bugged me over the 
years is that it is now one of the few pieces 
of radio gear that t use on a constant basis 
that isn't digitized. Making it was the perfect 
final touch. 

There are many widgets out there that 
can do the job, but the Universal Digital 
Frequency Readout by Torrestronics, Inc. 
(a family company run by Al Torres KP4AQI), 
is one of the nicest examples of such. It is 
sold in both kit form and fully wired; it will 
allow you to digitally read the receive/trans- 
mit frequencies to the nearest 100 Hz. 
The frequency range (rf input) is from TOO 
kHz to 50 MHz and the unit has a display 
format of four 7-segment LED readouts 0.3" 
high, with the 100-kHz, 10-kHz, and 1-kHz 
digits in red and the 100-Hz digit in either 
green or yellow. 



The enclosure is what looks to be a Ten-Tec 
type, ft comes with interfacing instructions 
for more than twenty different types of equip- 
ment. Chances are that whatever rig you 
own, it's listed, One really nice feature is a 
very complete assembly/operating manual (a 
pleasure to read after seeing some of the fad- 
ed, poorly written ones that seem to abound 
these days). 

I decided to give my FRG-7 its °new look" 
one Saturday afternoon while Bob WA2KHR, 
who shares my fascination with gadgets, was 
visiting. Bob is helpful to have around, espe- 
cially if you can gel him into a "Hey, that's 
kinda interesting . Jemmie see it for a sec" 
sort of sounding board mode, and then hand 
him the soldering iron. Anyway, while I was 
watching a really crummy movie on cable, 
preparing Dim-Sum, and generally shooting 
the breeze, the whole digitizing of my FRG-7 
took place. 

1 found only two discrepancies in the inter- 
facing instructions, and these were not diffi- 
cult to detect and fix: the assembly manual 
was perfect and explained away most every- 
thing. The two errors were: 

1. There is no jumper between M and N 
(step G). You should set the up/down switch in 
back to down. 

2 Step H specifies a DIP switch setting of 
545.0, but the DIP setting must be 4550 
(1000 - 545) as per the instructions in the 
assembly manual (page 17). 

All in all, J found that this was a fine piece of 
merchandise with a very attractive price tag. It 
works as advertised and I'm glad I finally gave 
in to the urge to "digitize " 

For more information about this product, 
circle number 202 on your Reader Service 
card. ■ 



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CIRCLE 272 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio ■ July, 1987 27 



Sailing With Ham Radio 




by Chris Schmidt KA IMPL 



Paradise Cay Publications 

1001 Bndgeway r #405 

Say&alitoCA 94965 

Price: $9.95 ppd. 



The yachtsman is faced with many choices 
when determining what kind of communi- 
cations equipment to install in his sailboat. 
Sailing With Ham Radio, by Ian Keith 
WA6DNV and Derek Van Loan WB6VXS, pre- 



4i The word 'marine' on 

any piece of equipment 

means that its cost is 

double that of the non- 

'marine' equivalent" 



sents an overview of the nautical ham radio 
option and, in the process* provides an excel- 
lent basic description of what ham radio is. 

SWHR starts by explaining the advantages 
and disadvantages of ham radio as compared 
to marine SSB. The main advantage ol ham 
radio is cost (the word "marine" on any piece 
of equipment means that its cost is double that 
of the non-"marine" equivalent). Phone 
patches are cheaper, equipment is cheaper, 
and you gain a better understanding of your 
boat's electrical system, On the other band, 
marine SSB has no license examination, no 
restrictions on third-party traffic, and allows 
commercial communication, 

Obviously, the premise of the book is that 
ham radio is a good option for nautical com- 
muncation, and the second section tells you 
how to go about getting a license— where to 
gel study materials, code tapes, etc, The ai> 
thors recommend that you go for a General- 
class license. 

Following the licensing information are very 
basic descriptions of electricity and mag- 
netism, as well as how radio works in general. 
The information here is not at all complete — 
but it is not an attempt to teach theory for the 
license test; rather it is to help the reader 
understand the rest of the book The illustra- 
tions are simple and clear— no intimidating 
large schematics. 

The nuts and bolts of a nautical ham radio 
station are covered thoroughly. Information 
about antenna designs, finding a good 
ground, corrosion, installation, weather FAX, 
and lightning protection covers the questions 
that the average sailor would pose. The au- 
thors take great pains to explain all ham terms 
because the terminology is one aspect of ham 
radio that does scare people away. 

Dad Knows Best 

My father is a sailor who knows nothing 
about ham radio. I gave him this book to read 

28 73 Amateur Radio • August, 1987 




and he loved it. He said that it answers ques- 
tions he's been wondering about for years, 
For a sailor interested in learning about ham 
radio, Sailing With Ham Radio is the perfect 
introduction. 

For more information, circle Reader Service 
number 206 ■ 



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■ Available in power outputs of 30 and 
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• Microphone and power cord supplied 

RECEIVER 

Frequency Range: 23.0000-23 9999 MHz 
Circuit Type 

Superheterodyne, dual conversion 
Clanfier Range ■ 500 Hz 
Sensit^ity SSB & C W better than 3 mV for 

10 dBS-NN FM better ttian 0.5 *jV to 

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SSB. CW 4 2 KHz S-6 KHz 

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I fear Warranty 



Provides distinctive audifriecftirp alter 
contact has been made and meter reading 
has stabilized Has TOUCH-HOLD feature 
to al lo w read mg s to be logged: gr referred 
to before making the next reading Up 10 
tOAMPcurrenl capability and a continuity 
function which beeps an zero Ohms 







' 


FF PML4UPI II 'dr* 

41 


3 


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piflr> -== 


, -. - = - 




*-~ _J 




S4495 

wit eu includes 
AC *da Mm 

RR^ kit $39.9S 



$6995 

mtttc 
PS-ZIJt 





wired iilcludei 
AC a 133,1 in: 



PR-2 COUNTER PREA MP 

I he PR-2 is ideal for measuring weak signals 
from 10 to 1,000 mi * Hal 25db gain * BNC 
connectors • greal for smiting RF • ideal 
receiver/TV preamp 

PS-2 AUDIO MULTIPLIER 

The PS-2 is handy for high lesolution audio 
r esolulion measurenienis. multiplies Up in 
frequency * great for PL tone measurements 
• multiples by 10 or 100 • 01 Hz resolution 
4 built-in signal preampf conditioner 

PS-IOBIGHzPRESCALER 

E* lends the jartge of yflur present counter to 
I GHz » 2 stage preamp • divide by TODO cir- 
cuitry * super sensitive iSOmV typical} • 
BNC connectors* 1 GHz in, 1MHz out * 

drives any counter 



MINI KITS-EASY TO ASSEMBLE-FUN TO USE-FOR BEGINNERS, STUDENTS AND PROS 



10m w 
Aciwngirit 




Q*iMVr PC&lws Fofens 40O-30QG 

up* 



Cimpierc *n 10- r 



$5.95 



40WArrzmif 

PWftAMP 

Sin 41 li L- Ifl I :* C paws r a mp leatuf e & fl 
limit pdwfl 1 rj.tiA tWin Tar & qui ? W in 

lOi U , . , A , inJnr4DiWaul MaKOiilimi 

ol50W in value csmpltilfiuiilli 

jiipj'V. icMcautntrT-Rrfitiv 

p» 1 4owpwf t»«M S22.95 

Tit 1 Iff Mfl*d T H n£iy k.T 6.95 



COLOR ORGAN 

Sn ■wsc cw tttvtt 3 



DnthfM 



n^i r 



asiyadivs: 



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S8J5 



ffNCE ACTUATED 
SWfTCK 

Waice activjieatiwiEtn 
hi! pr oxides switched 
0ut(Wit«i1he«fri!riici- 
pabilHy upio 100 111A 
Can drive 'aluy'i 1 1 • 1 1 1 - * . 
LCDD'eveTiaMi'i 
HfCO'de^ mplia' RMfl iftfl 

VS DOT 

SG.95 



VrDFOMQDULAlOR 

stable. kn^iftl»aref>A-6 ffcrsonS-^V 
HX«Efl55td wtKoHpul ReluniHtthft 



LUinJMHfftIT 

pABHailOk LR*l«v 
mnadfeLtaaens 
warnmg cumrtiigMs 

BL-mii S2.95 



UNIVERSAL TINIER 

Provide the bJTiiL . 
andPCtioardrequKBdio 
(jrovdea^.' i • ■ ■'!'■' 

ijpneralion Uses 4 to 
linverC^nd includes a 
rang* art pari v lor m«i 
Tiding need! 

UT-5K51 $5,95 



RUD HAM EH 
Fv«SjCCiLDUOearSZHrt 
H«i art jIH waai i yi 
bngsrenhkesouni Can 
supper 141 is tS*atnoi 
ofl noamrt w/ho Run 
00&1SVX 

we-iKjr $4.95 



WHISPEflLlfiHI 

Aninler Khng-iiil.Mii.il! 
mike picks up sound* 
and convert thu itUu 
ntjhi Tut iQiidrr irw 

■ Mntftriflhirmnii 
iighi Includes rink* tqp- 
EfqJsiipioJDOW lunton 

110 VAC 

*!-■ S6.95 




a-v-/FWtiTDjouiiT«'n 
ifieaf tf^ or phm 
Rwtsonjraav r»5*FV 
?)U5 added MftKii,* 

Fld-T m $3.95 
FM-yh.l $4*95 



SIREN 

Produces upw;n H .mil 

i.lr!wnw;nilw,u| bW 
peah aMiVinnijun runs 
□^ 3-^5 vol li use ii 3-45i 
oFvm speaker 

CowpWe*'! SM'3 

$2,95 



SUPtH 

siHrm 




tori 

nnsfiulpkit rxKwcvifiTo 
15 w I ts. uses A4Sohm 
syaaker 

^■blhii $5,95 




EClHMLMtBASI 

Rurt&wib-ISVDC. 
Low-cunentlZSmil 
lmin.fnonlti pooiflQi 

TR^&KiT $5-50 
TMAssy $9,95 





TiLEPHME 
TUISHTTTIN 

Uw nja yrttti prah»- 
sajnal performance Fea- 

luresmciurte Mlfshanr 
iiAepDwmeir lunata 

.'61a 100 W H/ 

poldNlVJPf'!ie'M%!' 

compact s^a I • 1 • ■ 
uraly Installs arty wrier* 

Mthapna 
•nsideiwinwium- I 

PE-l KIT 

S 14.95 



FKHECEim 

fv DtJiNnapphcaioas 
or habav apcrmistt* 
ban FuUfladgadwptf- 
Iwfjoc^na no*w 
enter 'jvci it *irtitlu 
10,7 afh^i- 
CircuiKfetfrcctH St 
audioampEiht!^ uv 
Miernaip^uuerfou'ce, 
ope tati p(L4n standard 
FW broatftasi tiitntl ;>s 

well as large por 1 101 1 1 

eichsuJE compaM Irfi' 
squareMbrbugflL-i. .1. 
io'!OTr«ep(njn 

fr-iht $14.95 




fv m^sniMliI 1 
Tr ansms a stibift %^rtai 
iiplo 300 ?ard* »itn 
cxeeptwnal audiaqualily 
Bv means ai\ ts &u;i hn 
wectret mifce Kitirvcludti 
wiie.mike.on-oiliwiicft. 
nnlenna, bailerv and 
StrpsrinirtruGEirjrts Ihiill 
jhe finest unnauii 1 ih,r 

FMJKit $14.95 

rM4Wi T erJandT^r&fl 



19.95 



ACCESSORIES FOR RAMSEY COUNTERS 

TetescQpic whip antenna — BNC plug S 8.95 

High impedance probe, light loading 1 6.95 

Low pass probe, audio use 16.95 

Direct probe, general purpose use 1 3.95 

Till bail, for CT-70,flO. 125 3.95 



22] 



PHONE ORDERS CALL 

716-586-3950 

TELEX 466735 RAMSEY CI 
FAX 716-586-4754 



.Mo^TCoia 



mntmm tf tlQ « * larrip iM^irarfKV ■atf^tMD aM U M 
fM m m privl * mfcn aaaer tBJVaflri 1 1 iO • VT naiip4ia*l r , 
nkmx • n«*ipaminrTv«| n tfthta * 1 paaraam&labar 
■ aif lip an all wind mbx. 

RAMSEY ElfCTRDNICS. INC. 
KTSftatrdRd ItafriLTS 
Penfidd.H.ir.l452G 



THE NATIONAL 

CHAMPIONSHIPS 

CW: September 5, 1987 



SSB: September 6, 1987 



For the first time ever, the "Little Gun" has a 
chance to become a National Champion! The Na- 
tional Championships have been designed to rec- 
ognize the Contest Operator of the Year. Unlike 
other events, they single out the best Contest 
Operator in the USA, not just the station with the 
biggest hardware investment! 

There will be a National Sideband Champion 
and a National CW Champion. The combination 
of these two contest scores will determine the 
Contest Operator of the Year. 

Contestants, analyze your band plan. Do not 
take these events for granted. They are, without 
doubt, the most complex stress-testing events on 
the bands today. If you understand the rules, 
youll recognize "traps" strewn in your path. Be- 
ing lax could spell your doom. Should you work all 
bands? How do you maintain your QSO rate with- 
out sacrificing your multiplier average? Should 
you be using the monobander? What happens 
when you switch to 10 or 160 meters for the 10- 
point QSOs? it's up to you, the Operator, to do 
what's best for you! 

EXTERNAL AMPLIFIERS ARE PROHIBITED 
Run barefoot (up to 200 Watts maximum exciter 
output power} or your entry is disqualified. 

Contest Dates 

The First Annual National CW Championship 
Contest is at 0000-2400 UTC on September 5. 
1987. 

The First Annual National SSB Championship 
Contest is at 0000-2400 UTC on September 6, 
1987. 

Eligibility 

Open to single-operator stations within the 50 
US, States only. A station must be capable of 
operating two or more bands; there are no single- 
band categories. Eligible bands include 10, 15, 
20\ 40, 75/80 , and 1 60 meters. 

Miscellaneous Rules 

Stations may operate only 13 hours of each 
24-hour contest- The same station may be 
worked once on each band. For stations submit- 
ting a contest entry, external amplifiers are strict- 
ly prohibited . Exciter output must not exceed 200 
Watts. 

Mandatory Band Switching 

This rule separates the men from the boys, 
Read it over several times, as it is the toughest 
rule to interpret. Be sure you understand it! Viola- 
tors must be disqualified and their entries pro- 
cessed as check logs. 

Stations submitting an entry must operate only 
on asingle band during the following time frames: 
0000-0300 UTC, 0300-0600 UTC, 0600-0900 
UTC, 0900-1200 UTC, 1200-1500 UTC, 1500- 
1800 UTC, and 1800-2100 UTC. In other words, 
you mustestabfish a band within a time frame and 
cannot move from that band until the next frame. 

30 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 




At no 
time from 
0000-2100 
UTC may you work 
the same band dur- 
ing two consecutive 
time frames. At least one 
time frame must pass before the same band can 
be worked again. From 21 00-2400 UTC only may 
stations switch to any band as often as they like. 

Exchange 

All stations must transmit RS(T)and U.S. State, 

QSO Points 

10 QSO points per valid QSO on 10 or 160 
meters, 5 QSO points per valid QSO on 15, 20, 
40, or 75/80 meters. 

Multiplier Points 

1 multiplier point for each state worked on 15, 
20, 40, or 75/80 meters. 2 multiplier points for 
each state worked on 10 or 1 60 meters. 

Multiplier Average 

Multiplier average is determined by totalling all 
multiplier points and dividing them by the number 
of bands operated. 

Antenna Multiplier 

3 Antenna Multipliers for each band worked 
with a wire antenna design or vertical antenna. 
Antennas must be fed with a single feedline and 
not be in a phased configuration, Quads are not 
considered wire antennas! 

2 Antenna Multipliers for each band worked 
with a duo-, tri-, or quad-band antenna fed with a 
single feedline and not in a phased configuration. 

1 Antenna Multiplier for each band worked with 
an antenna not specified in the previous two cate- 
gories. 

Note that more than one antenna may be used 
on a band but only one antenna maybe used at a 
time. 

Final Score 

QSO Points x Multiplier Average x Antenna 
Multiplier = Final Score. 

Contest Entry 

Entries must include a separate log for each 
band worked, a summary sheet itemizing QSOs 
per band, QSO points per band, multipliers per 
band, antenna multipliers per band, and total ac- 
cumulated score. Entries must describe antenna 
used on each band and sign a declaration that 



the contest oper- 
ator abided by the 
contest rules. 

Entry Deadline 

Entries must be post- 
marked and forwarded to the 
contest address below no later 
than October 20, 1987. 

Rules, Forms, Entries 

Forms are available from the contest commit- 
tee. Send an SASE to: The National Champi- 
onships, 2665 Busby Road, Oak Harbor WA 
98277. 

Disqualifications 

Contestants not following the band-switch- 
ing requirements will be disqualified. Stations 
falsely reporting antennas used or falsely 
reporting output power will be disqualified. 
Scores requiring more than a 3% scoring adjust- 
ment due to duplicate contacts or scoring errors 
will be disquaiified. Contest committee decisions 
are final! 

Penalties 

A penalty of one multiplier point, before 
averaging, will be assessed for each dupli- 
cate contact count on the same band and 
not discounted by the contestant on his/her 
entry, 

Awards 

A minimum of 250 QSOs must be worked to be 
eligible for awards. Awards will be issued to the 
operator with the most points in each Call District 
and U.S. State. Plaques will be issued to the 
National SSB Champion and National CW Cham- 
pion, 

The CONTEST OPERATOR OF THE YEAR 
TROPHY will be awarded to the contester with 
the highest combined score for the two 
contests, ■ 



Send For Your 

National Championship 

Entry Forms Today 

The National Championships 
2665 Busby Road 
Oak Harbor, WA 98277 



*»x 



-*!W 



IS 



i t&* iJP*! 






1*^ 



ooo: 



Hf Equifytnpni 

IC-761 HF xGVf/SW rcvr/ps/AT 
CIV Computer interlace adapter 
EX 310 Voice synthesiser... 



Regular SALE 
2499.00 2199 
TBA 

4600 




IC-7S1A 9-band icw/.l 30 MHz rcvr 

PS 35 internal power supply 

FL-32 500HiCWWter(lstlF)..„. 

FL-63 250 Hz CW h«« (1st IF) 

FL-52A 500 Hi CW filter (2nd IF) .. . 
FL-53A 250 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 

FL-33 AM filler 

FL-70 2%kHl *ide SSB Mter .. 

flC-10 External frequency controller 

IC 745 9 band xcvr a 1 30 MHz rcvr 
PS-35 Internal power supply . 

EX-24 1 Marfcer unit . ♦ , 

EX-242 FMunil.... 

EX-243 Electronic hey^r unit 

FL 45 500 Hz CW filler llsHF|... 

FL-54 270 Hz CW filter (ls( IF) 

FL-52A 500 Hz CW filter (2nd IF) 
FL-53A 250 Hz CW hlter (2nd IF} 
FL-44A SSB Idler (2nd IF] „ 



199.00 179 

66 50 

5450 

108,00 99** 
108.00 99" 

35.25 

52 00 

3925 

1049.00 899" 
19900 179* 

2250 

4400 

56.00 

66.50 

53.00 

108.00 99" 
108.00 99« 
178.00 159" 




IC-735 HF transceiver/SW rcvr/rmc 
PS* 55 External power B"iip0ly v -.4, 
AT- 150 Automatic antenna tuner .. 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter ... 

EX-243 Electronic keyer unit . 
LIT-30 Tone encoder .... 



4 ■ * ■ t -i 1 



Other Accessories 
IC-2KL 160 15m solid state amp w/ps 
PS- 1 5 20A external power supply 
PS 30 Systems p/s w/cord, 6 pin plug 
OPC Opt cord, specify 2, 4 or G-pin 

MB Mobile mouni, 735/745/751A 

SP-3 External speaker , 

SP-7 Small external speaker ,.„. 

C« 64 High stab rel xtal (745/751) 

PP-1 Speaker/patch 

Stt-fi Desk microphone 

SM-8 Desk mic two cables, Scan 

SM-10 Compressor/graph EQ, 8 pin mic 
AT 100 1OOW0 band auto, antenna tuner 
AT-500 5O0W9 band auto, antenna tonef 
AH 2 8 -band tuner w/mount & « 
AH-2A Antenna loner system, only.... 



999.00 

199.00 

445.00 

66.50 

56.00 

17 50 

Regular 

1999.00 

169 00 

299.00 

1000 

24,50 

6 LOO 

4900 

63:00 

15925 

44,95 

78-50 

136.25 

445.00 

559.00 

62500 

495.00 



799" 
179 95 

349" 



SALE 
1699 
154** 
269" 



149" 



124" 



489" 
549** 

429" 




Other Accessaries - i atttmiwit: Regular SALE 
GC-5 World clock.. ......„..„ 9195 89" 

6-meter VHF Portable Regular SALE 

IC-505 3, 10W 6m SSB/CW portable 549 00 4B9" 

EX-248 FM unit 55.50 

LC-10 Leather case 39,50 

VHF UHF base mutti-miuh Regular SALE 

IC-551D SOW 6-meier SSB/CW 799.00 719" 

EX-106 FM option 140.00 126" 

BC-10A Memory backup 950 

IC-271A- 25W 2 meters... CLOSEOUT 85900 699" 

AG-20" Internal preamplifier 64 00 

IC-271H 100W2mFM/SSB/CW 109900 969" 

AG-25 Mast mounted preamplifier .„ 95.00 
IG-275A 25W 2m FM/SSB/CW w/ps 119900 1049 
IC-475A 25W 440 FM/SSB/CW w/ps 1399.00 1249 
IC-471A" 25W43M50....CL0SE0UT 979 00 769" 

AG-1" Mast mounted preamplifier ... 99 50 
IC 4711T 75W 430450 ... CLOSEOUT 1399.00 999*- 

AG-35' Mast mounted preamplifier 9500 



"Preamp S9 95 w»th 271A/471A/471H Purchase 



Accessories common to 271 A/ H and 471 A/ H 



PS-25 Internal power supply for (A) ... 
PS-35 Internal power supply for (H)„. 

S H -6 Desk m icrophone ....... .... 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 

TS-32 CommSpec en code/ decoder 

UT-15 Encoder /decoder interface... 
UT-15S UT 15S w/TS 32 installed 

VHF VHF mobile multi-modes 
IC-290H 25W2mSSB/FM. TTPmic... 
IC-490A LOW 430 440 CLOSEOUT 

VHF/ VHF/ 1.2 GHz FM 
IC-27A Compact 25W 2m FMw/TTP mic 
IC-27H Compact 45W 2m FMw/TTP mic 
IC-37A Compact 25W 220 FM. TTP mic 
IC-47A Compact 25W 440 FM. TTP mic 

PS-45 Compact 8 A power supply . 

UM6/EX-388 Voice synthesizer , 

SP-LO Slimline external speaker, 

IC-28A 25W2mFM,TTPmic 

IC-28H 45W2m FM, TTP mic 

IC-38A 25W 220 FM, TTP mic ., 

IC-48A 25W 440-450 FM. TTP mic, 

HM-14 TTP microphone ,., 

UT-28 Digital code squelch 

UT-29 Tone squelch decoder 

HM-16 Speaker/microphone 

IC-900 Transceiver controller 

UT-29A 2m25Wunit , 



115 00 104*' 
199 00179" 

44 95 

46 00 

5995 

14.00 

9200 

Regular SALE 
639.00 5W* 
699.00 499" 



Regular 
429 00 
45900 
499 00 
54900 
139.00 

34.99 

35.99 
459.00 
489 00 
48900 
48900 

55,50 

37.50 

43.00 

34,00 

589.00 529" 
295.00 269" 



SALE 
369" 
399" 

439" 
479" 
129" 



399" 
429" 
429" 
429" 



IC-320OA 25W 2m/440 FMw/TTP.. 

UT-23 Voice synthesizer 

AH-32 2m/440 Dual Band antenna . 

AKB-32 Trunk-lip mount 

Larsen PO-K Root mount 

Larsen PO-TLM Trunk-lip mount.. 

Larsen PO MM Magnetic mount.. 
RP-3010 440 MHz, 10W FM, rtal cont. 
IC-1200A 10Wl.2GHzFMMorj.le_. 
IC-127LA 10W 1,2 GHz SSB/CW Base 

AG - L 200 Ma st m ou n ted p re a m pi i tie r 

PS-25 Internal power supply ., 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer. . 

TV* 1200 ATV interlace tmil . . , . 

UT-15S CTCSS encoder /decoder ... 
RP-12I0 1 2GHj.10WFM.99ch synth 



599.00 

34.99 

3700 

34 00 

20 00 

20 J 8 

19.63 

122900 

699 00 

1229.00 

105 00 

115 00 

46.00 

129 00 

92 00 

147900 



529" 



1089 
629" 
1069 

104" 

119" 

1289 



f — !^^T 




MasterCard 




Hand-helds Regular SALE 

IC2A 2-meters 279 00 249" 

IC-2AT w.thTTP„„„. 29900 259" 
IC-3AT 220 MHz, TTP 339.00 299" 
IC-4AT 440 MHz. TTP 339.00 2W* 

IC-Q2AT 2-meters 365.00 299" 

IC02AT/High Power 39900 339" 
IC-03AT for 220 MHz 449.00 399" 
IC-04AT fof 440 MHz 449.00 389" 

I C-u2A 2-meters 299-00 269" 

IC-u2AT with TTP™. 329 00 289" 
Accessories for IC~u2A/T (CALL) 

IC-I2AT 1W 12GHz FM HT/batt/cgr/TTP 459.00 399* - 

A-2 5W PEP synth aircraft HT 599 00499" 

Accessories for fC ser/es Regular 

BP-7 425mah/13 2V Nicad Pak - use BC-35 74.25 

BP-8 800mah/8.4V Nicad Pak use BC-35... 74.25 

BC-35 Drop in desk charger for all batteries 74.50 

BC-16U Wall charger for BP7/BPS..... 20.25 

LC 11 Vinyl case for Dlx using BP-3 20,50 

LC 14 Vinyl case for Otx using BP-7/8 20.50 

LC-02AT Leather case for dh models w/BP-7/8 54,50 
An essotfes for IC and SC-O ^errei Rfguttf 

BP-2 425mah/7.2V Nfcad Pak - use BC35 ... 47 00 

BP-3 Extra Std 250 mah/8.4V Nicad Pak. ... 37 50 

BP-4 Alkaline battery case „„ 1525 

BP-5 425mah/108V Nicad Pak - use BC35 58 50 

CA-5 5/8- wave telescoping 2m antenna . 18 95 

FA-2 Extra 2m flexible antenna 1150 

CP-1 Cig, lighter plug/cord for 8P3 or Dtx ... 1300 

CP-10 Battery separation cable w/clip ... 22 50 

DC-1 DC operation pak for standard models 23 25 

MB-16D Mobde mtg . bkt for all HTs 24 50 

LC-2AT Leather case for standard models .... 54 50 

RB- 1 Vinyl waterprool radio bag 34,95 

HH-SS Handheld shoulder strap L6.95 

HM-9 Speaker microphone 47.00 

HS-10 Boom microphone/ headset 23 25 

HS-10SA Vox unit for HS-10 & Deluxe only 23.25 

HS- 10SB PTT unit for HS-10 23.25 

ML-1 2m 2.3w in/lOw out amplifier ... SALE 99.95 

SS-32M Commspec 32-tone encoder 29.95 

Receivers Regular SALE 

ft 71 A 100 kHz 30 MHz, 117V AC $949.00 799" 



67.25 
6650 

54.50 

178.00 159" 
42.50 
46,00 
63.00 



RC-11 Infrared remote controller., 

FL-32 500 Hz CW filter 

FL-63 250 Hz CW filter (1st IF).... 

FL-44A SSBhlfer[2nd IF) 

EX-257 FM unit 

EX-310 Voice- synthesizer..... 

CR-64 High stability oscillator xtal 

SP-3 External speaker 61.00 

CK-70(EX299) 12V DC option 12,25 

MB 12 Mobile mount 24.50 

R-7000 25 MHz 2 GHz scanning rcvr 1099.00 969" 
RC-12 Infrared remote controller ... 67 25 

EX-310 Voice synthesizer 4600 

TV R7000 ATV unit 131.95 119" 

AH -7000 Radiating antenna 89 95 (i) 



HOURS • Mon. thru FrL 9-5:30; Sat 9-3 

Milwaukee WATS line: 1-800-558-0411 answered 
evenmgs until 8:00 pm Monday thru Thursday 
WATS lines are for Quotes & Ordering only, 
use Regular line for other lnlo& Service dept 



All Prices m thrs list are subject to change without notice 



Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



In Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-800-242-5195 



;Ii]:i[*iUJi 



Inc. 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, Wl 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



WICKUFFE. Ohio 44092 

2S940 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1 800 362-0290 



-AES BRANCH STORES 

ORLANDO, Fla. 32803 CLEARWATER, Fla. 33575 LAS VEGAS. Nev. 89106 



621 Commonwealth Ave. 

Phone (305) 894-3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800-432 9424 



1898 Drew Street 
Phone (813) 461-4267 

No In -State WATS 



1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 6473 114 

No In- State WATS 



Associate Store 

CHICAGO. Illinois 60630 

ERICKSQN COMMUNICATIONS 

5456 N. Milwaukee Avenue 

Phone (312) 631^5181 



SK?* 1-800-321-3594 K e 1-800-327-1917 



No Nationwide WATS £££' 1-800-634-6227 15 min. from O'Harel 



Robert E. Bloom W6YUY 
8622 Ruhio Avenue 
Sepuiveda CA 91343 



The Two-Meter 
Transverter Project 



Build this VMOS transverter and use all of your 
Kenwood TS-940's bells and whistles—on two meters! 



You are the proud owner of Kenwood's 
_ amazing TS-94QS* After about two 
months of discovering new buttons every 
day, you've run across the transverter access 
jack on the rear panel. Now that you have 
found it, what do you do with it? 

Interfacing a transverter with the 940 not 
only allows you to expand the 940* s fre- 
quency range into the VHF or UHF range but 
also enables you to use all of the 940's modes 
and functions up there. In addition, you can 
enjoy direct frequency readout to the near- 
est 10 Hz. 

I operate OSCAR 10 and SSB on 2 me- 
ters. Initially, I decided to make up a TS- 
940 converter interface for use on OSCAR. 
The unit features a highly stable ground* 
ed-gatc rf amplifier, a 40- MHz third-over- 
tone crystal oscillator, and a triple r for a 
120-MHz output. This would call for a 
24-to-28~MHz vfo i-f from the TS-940 
for direct frequency readout— 24,0 MHz 
representing 144 MHz, 25.0 representing 
145, and 28.0 representing 148, along with 
fractional readout in between. The OSCAR 



10 beacon, for example, reads out 25.8 10.00 
(145.810 MHz). 

The excellent operation of the converter/ 
940 comboprompted the development of a 
full 2-meter transverter, which expands 
the 940 communication range to include 2- 
meter SSB, AM, and FM, You wUI soon 
find that you can work long-haul DX on 2- 
meter SSB without repeaters, SSB gets out 
great where FM does not. If you must use 
FM, the 940's frequency split and smctf 
setsmc buttons put you on any pair you want 
in a flash, 

The project breaks down into three seg- 
ments, but does not include the required 
13.0-volt regulated power supply. The first 
segment is the receiver converter (Figs. 1 and 
2); the second is the linear low-level transmit- 
ter amplifier stages (Figs- 3 and 4); and the 
final module is a two-stage, state-of-the-art, 
and fascinating VMOS 40- or 60- Watt linear 
amplifier (Figs. 5 and 6), 

Basic Material for Boards and Cases 
Although both single- and double-sided 



printed circuit material is used, you will be 
relieved to know that you will not be required 
to make etched boards. The basic circuit 
boards will have circuitry on both sides that 
are interfaced through #55 holes drilled 
through the board. The PC material is used 
for four purposes: double-sided board for the 
bask circuit, shields, and module case and 
single-sided material for terminal pads to 
hpok all the components to. 

If you have a facility for cutting PC boards, 
you have an advantage. If not, you can do as I 
did— scribe, break, and file, It is not as diffi- 
cult as you might imagine. Take an old 1/2"- 
wide chisel, grind the sides more or less thin 
and parallel, and form a sharp hook on the 
front side. The hook is fashioned to scribe 
deeply through the foil and into the fiber or 
glass material. 

You will need a cutting board about 1 IT* to 
3/4 w thick, two 3" or 4" C clamps, and a stout 
piece of steel to use as a straightedge. Mark 
off the material and clamp the straightedge to 
the material to be cut, the waste side exposed 
to the cutting edge of the chisel. Draw the 





Photo A. Top view of the receiver and transmitter modules, 
32 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1907 



Photo B Bottom view of the receiver and transmitter modules. 



^ 





Photo C. Top view of the power amplifier showing the heat sink. 



Photo D, Bottom view of the power amplifier. 



chisel along the scribe line, scoring away the 
material* It will take six to eight swipes to get 
the edge deep enough* For the initial large 
cuts, it will require scribing the board on both 
sides, 

The material can be snapped off while still 
clamped, or it can be placed between the jaws 
of a bench vise. As the pieces become 
smaller, the breaking of the material is all 
done in the vise. Like-sized pieces, such as 
the box sides, are stacked together and filed 



square in the vise. The material should be 
checked with a 6" or 12" carpenter's square. 

This operation is time-consuming but sur- 
prisingly easy and precise. 

The single-sided material is cut into strips 
1/8", 3/16", 1/4", and a couple 5/16" wide. 
The wide strips are used on the power ampli- 
fier. These strips are cut to the desired lenglh 
with side-cutting pliers (commonly called 
dikes)* These pieces arc the soldering termi- 
nal pads and arc securely set into position on 



the circuit board with one or two drops of 
Eastman 910 adhesive (or Krazy Glue®)* It 
takes about four seconds to set up and can be 
soldered to immediately. 

Box Measurements 

The receiver converter fits into a module 
5" x 4-1/4" x 2" divided into an upper sec- 
tion 1-3/16" deep and a bottom section 
3/4" deep (Fig, 2)* This allows for the 1/16" 
section separator board thickness. Cut the 






L* 



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Fig. /. Two-meter receiver converter. 



73 Amateur Radio » July, 1987 33 



long side sections to 5-1/8" and the narrower 
ends to 4-1/4" . [ used the weight and square- 
ness of a drill press vise to prop the material 
in position while spot-soldering the boxes 
together. You wilt need small pieces of jig 
material to hold the main hoard to the prop- 
er height position for the initial soldering of 
the box. 

The low-level transmitter module is 5" % 
4-3/8" x 2" (Fig. 4). Here again, make the 
longer side material 1/8" longer than the 5" 
main board length to compensate for the 
1/16" thickness of the two end pieces. 

The d intensions of the power ampl i tier will 
somewhat depend on the heat-sink material 
you use. My heat sink was 8" x 5-1/2"* The 
nine cooling fins were only 1/2* deep, but 
were ridged on both sides. I recommend 3/4" 
to I" fins. The PC board mounted within 
the heat sink and measured 7-3/4 " x 3-3/4" 
(Fig. 6). 

The driver and final stages were laid out 
parallel to one another rather than in the 
more conventional serial layout. A shield 
of double-sided material separates the 
stages, A length of 1/8" 50-Ohm RG-174 



coax connects the output of the driver to 
the input of the final. T suggest a board 
width of at least 4" rather than the 3-3/4" 1 
used. The final stage could be brought for- 
ward by about 1 " to avoid crowding at its 
output. 

You can lay out the parts sequentially 
as construction progresses stage by stage 
from the schematic. The component layouts 
mainly show transistors, coils, tuning ca- 
pacitors, some coupling capacitors, and 
feedthrough capacitors in their relative place- 
ments. From there, it is easy to determine 
the position of the other components, namely 
1/4-Watt carbon resistors and .001 disc ce- 
ramic bypass capacitors. Other capacitors are 
dipped silver micas (dog-bone type). There is 
no reason to crowd , as there is plenty of room 
in each compartment for all of the compo- 
nents, even if those you choose are somewhat 
larger. 

Interfacing the System 
With the TS-940 

Since Kenwood does not make a trans- 
verter t they provide practically no informa^ 



■i }'••■ 



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MODULE ALL ENTER 
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Fig. 2. Relative parts placement diagram for the receiver converter. 



tion about using one, although they do give a 
very abbreviated drawing of the jack and its 
pin identifications. For more than this, you 
must refer to the Kenwood parts layout and 
schematic diagrams, which is quite a chore* 
The information in Fig. 7, a wiring dia- 
gram that includes the relay circuits, is what 
you need. 

Inserting the special 8-pin DIN plug into 
the jack immediately inhibits the 94CTs LF 
transmit capability. The plug mechanically 
activates switch contacts that isolate circuitry 
from the HF antenna connections. (Refer to 
the service manual schematic on the upper 
left corner of page 103.) 

Here are the pin functions from page 29 of 
the operator's manual: Pins 1 and 3 are 
grounding connections for the shields of RG- 
174 coax. Pin 2 provides the 12 volts @ 50 
mA needed to activate an external control 
relay. Pin 4, when grounded by an external 
switch , activates an internal (940) relay (#3), 
which disconnects the 940* s vco from its rf 
amplifier input stage. Pin 5 accepts the 
transverter's receiver mixer output (24-to- 
28-MH/} signal. Pin 6 is an ALC signal if 
you need it for an amplifier. Pin 7 provides 
a vco i-f signal output of about 100 mW for 
the transverter's transmit mixer. Pin 8 is 
the 940's internal high-frequency antenna 
junction. 

Get an 8-pin mike plug and jack— the same 
as on your mike input to the 940. This will 
become the input plug for the transvener. It 
and a triple-pole double-throw switch are in- 
stalled on the low-level transmitter module 
where all control takes place. 

Make up a 5-wire cable approximately 
18" long; attach ihe DIN plug at one end 
of the 8-pin mike plug on the other. Three 
of the conductors will be RG-174 1/8" 50- 
Ohrn coaxial cable (available from Henry 
Radio). The coax cables connect to pins 5, 
7, and 8. Insulated stranded 20-gauge wire 
conductors connect to pins 2 and 4. To 
avoid confusion, the same numbering is used 
on the mike plug end as is used on the DIN 
plug. The on/off switch provides a ground 
return for the 940*s transverter jack pin 4 
as noted above. It also provides 12 volts to 
i he transvener oscillator chain and it con- 
nects pins S and 8 of the DIN plug together 
to reestablish low-frequency transmission ca- 
pability to the 940 when the transvener is 
turned off. 

Now, before I get into the construction part 
of the transvener, there is a necessary bit of 
vital information about the 940 of which you 
should be aware. Ham equipment with full 
coverage of 2 to 30 MHz has built-in trans- 
mit-inhibiting circuitry so that the equipment 
will not transmit out of the authorized ham 
bands. You will, however, need transmitting 
capability from 24 to 28 MHz in order to use 
the transverter. 

In order to have this capability, you 
will have to cut diode D130 t which is lo- 
cated on the unit B PC board Located just 
behind the LCD sub-display and the 
notch squelch control, (This information 
was previously published in the Ken 
wood newsletter of the International Radio 



$4 7$ Amateur Radio • July, 1987 




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Fig. J- Low-level transmitter mixer and 144-148-MHz linear amplifier chain. 



Club, issue 54, May, 1985 J Now, let's pro- 
ceed in earnest to the heart of the technical 
material. 

Receiver Converter Description 

The basic circuit concept with much modi* 
fication and redesign was made around the 
converter published in the 1985 ARRL Hand- 
book (from the chapter on VHF equipment, 
page 31.5). 1 had difficulty getting any of a 
quantity of overtone crystals to operate as 
described in the oscillator circuit shown. AH 
of the crystals wanted to oscillate on their 
fundamental, but did put out the third over- 
tone at the drain. Despite that, all of the 
crystals were military overtone devices. 1 
was unable to isolate the fundamental of 
13.33333 MHz while trying to get a single 
JFET to multiply out to 120 MHz in its out- 
put drain. It might work with some crystals, 
however. 

This circuit was redesigned using a bipolar 
2N3563; it will work equally well with a 
2N918 or 2N2222, One of my converters 
worked well with an air coil in L1L but I 
detected some stray signals radiating in a 
second unit. The condition was resolved by 
use of a capacitive divider and a toroidal 
inductor, Attempting to obtain too much 
from a single stage has its drawbacks, so I 
added a trjplcr circuit. 

There is always a loss in output when you 
are frequency multiplying. For a rule of 
thumb, you can retain about 55% of the input 
power in doubling and about 35% when 
tripling. 1 thought of using a 60-MHz crystal 
and a doubter, which may have eliminated 



one of the stages in the chain, but I had second 
thoughts on the matter. 

Before leaving the oscillator stage, 1 should 
note that the lowest frequency obtainable 
from the oscillator with the crystals pur- 
chased was 375 Hz high. Adjustment of CI 
only increased the frequency further, A small 
inductance thai I designate as L0 was added to 
the end of the crystal that would normally go 
to ground. This brought the frequency down 
by about 500 Hz, 

Too much inductance will stop oscilla- 
tion altogether, I ended up with about .39 
uH, .5 uH. or .6 uH maximum, You can 
make up this inductance by winding #36 
wire on a 1/4- Watt resistor of 5,000 Ohms 
or higher. Start with about 20 turns and re- 
move turns until the frequency is down by 
about 400 Hz. A small trimmer or air ca- 
pacitor can tune the inductance, I used a 3- 
to-22-pF air trimmer, but it only required 
about 10 pF. I tuned out one-half of the capac- 
ity in C 1 1 , then set the exact frequency or 
slightly below with C 12, then tuned it right on 
with CI I. 

The test point for the counter probe was 
at the capacitor divider junction (CI 3 and 
CI 4), I used the counter test probe in its 
X10 position for minimum circuit loading. 
Another way would be to hold the tip of 
the probe near LI 3 and adjust the oscillator 
to exactly 120 MHz. If the crystal you use 
falls below 40 MHz with one side of the 
crystal to ground, you can eliminate LO and 
C12 by directly grounding that side of the 
crystal. 

The tripler output i* tuned to 120 MHz by 



virtue of LI 2 and C 15 J used a 2N4221 JFET 
for the tripler, although a 2N5485 or 5486 
and others can be substituted. An additional 
120-MHz stage was needed, but did not re- 
quire a great deal more gain for receiver 
injection. 

Some additional oscillator level is required 
for the transmitter section. This initially cre- 
ated a moderate problem: The first unit 1 
made up had just enough gain in this stage to 
provide the proper receiver mixer injection 
voltage one turn off the hot end of the coil. 
Everything was fine until I got to the low- 
impedance point for driving the additional 
stage for the transmitter where the tap was 
just off the cold end. 

When I switched to transmit* the lower 
impedance tap on L13 was less of a load on 
the circuit and required less capacity for reso- 
nance, I had to provide a diode-switched ca- 
pacitor in the circuit to regain resonance for 
receive. The present revised Q6 circuit now 
supplies enough gain so that the receiver in- 
jection point is just above that for the trans- 
mitter and no additional compensating capac- 
itor is required. 

Cascaded Front End and Filters 

A previous converter had intcrmod from 
a local FM station. 1 had to build a sepa- 
rate outboard filter to take care of this 
problem. On the input of the revised cir- 
cuit located on the bottom side of the receiv- 
er module is a combination bandpass fil- 
ter and an 88-MHz commercial FM band 
filter. This converter also has cascaded JFET 
pre-setector stages. Each stage has approxi- 



36 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



MUM 




/KLM 



COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT, INC. 







KT-34XA 
TRI BANDER 

BROADBAND EXCELLENCE THAT 
TAKES THE POWER 



KIM's KT-34XA TRIBANDER is the 2nd generation of a unique 
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coverage on 20, 15, and 10 meters. The combination of lossless 
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The lower weight and windload of a single antenna mean reduced 
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performance. 

KLM's field proven KK34A is the heart of the "XA" model. The 
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These changes increase the gain to 1 1 -1 1 .3 dBd on 1 0M. 9-9.5 dBd 
on 15M, and 8.5-9 dBd on 20M. Two driven elements are used to 
make the KT-34XA unusually broadbanded (a concept applied to 
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MHz. The chart shows the remarkable performance qualities of 
the KT-34XA. 

The KT-34XA's design represents the first major advancement 
in tri bander technology In over 20 years! The conventional traps, 
colls, and capacitors have been discarded In favor of integral 
linear loading and hl-Q air capacitors, all composed of aluminum 
tubing. These give the KT-34XA a conservative power handling ca- 
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BANDWIOTHS: , , . 14,0-14.350 MH* GAIN: t 8 T 5-9dB 



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FB/FS: ,20dB/40dB 

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BALUN: 3-60*4:1 5KW PEP 

ELEMENT LENGTH; 24 ft. 



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* 'When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 37 



^— 



mately 12 dB of gain, A single dual-gate 
MOSFET stage would provide 25 dB of gain, 
but could be quite unstable, especially in 
combination with my mast-mounted (low 
noise figure, 20-dB gain) GaAsFET pream- 
plifier. Grounded-gate FETs have only about 
one-half the gain of a dual-gate MOSFET. 
but they have two big advantages: low noise 
and high stability, 

The first stage, including the separately 
shielded L5, is also located on the bottom of 
the receiver module. A low-impedance tap on 
the coil connects to a 10- or 15-pF capacitor, 
then through a short piece of RG-174 50- 
Ohm coaxial cable op to the top side of the 
board and to the second grounded-gatc stage 



where L5 and Q2 have separate shielded 
compartments. 

The mixer stage Q3 is a dual -gate MOS- 
FET. The broadband mixer output is made 
up of 1/4" toroidal core inductors. Although 
I had fixed capacitors across these coils, 
the exact capacity would depend on the 
variations in core material, so 1 suggest 
small variable capacitors across both L8 
andL9, 

Summing up t the components in the con- 
verter, the oscillator lank, and the tripler 
stage use toroid core coils as does the 24 -to- 
28-MHz mixer stage. (Toroidal cores are 
available at a nominal fee from Arnidon 
Associates, 12033 Otsego Street, North 



t Srt In. 



-m**- 



■Z l/fl in.- 



lib v {5o5T> 



CM 





RG-174 




TOP 
VIEW 



v^^V ^/ 



4T-0 



Q 



■its nesisTona 



B>JC 
OUTPUT 



TT 



POHEft 





•orroH or low level 

WtT U0CUL£ 





BALANCE H»T, 

IN MIKE* 




GATE 50UHLE 
MIXfA COUPLING 



J=L 



n n n 



Wft 





Fig. 4, Placement of parts in the law-level linear transmitter section. 



Hollywood CA 91607.) The Q6 120-MHz 
oscillator stage of the receiver does not 
have sufficient power for the transmitter 
mixer, so an additional stage Q7 was add- 
ed . A 2N9 1 8 or 2N2222 can be used. There is 
at least 1 .5 V rms at its output for a minimum 
of45mW. 

Transmitter Mixer Circuit 

I researched a myriad of possible mixer 
circuits, including both active and passive 
double-balanced designs. Each was rejected 
for one reason or another. Serious consider- 
ation was given to the passive double-bal- 
anced design. But major advantages were 
immediately apparent by substituting bipo- 
lar transistors for the diodes. This brought 
things into the active concept: bipolar versus 
MOSFETs. A comparison of major charac- 
teristics, such as dynamic range, suppression 
of intermodulation products, and cross-mod- 
ulation effects, was performed, 

FETs have inherent transfer characteristics 
approaching a square taw response; thus, 
third-order intermodulation products are 
much reduced over that of the bipolar device. 
Harmonic distortion and cross-modulation 
effects are third-order dependent and are 
greatly reduced when FETs are used in an 
active balanced mixer. A secondary ad van- 
tage is derived from the available conversion 
gain so that the FET mixer becomes simulta- 
neously equivalent to both a demodulator and 
a preamplifier. Finally, the FET has an ad- 
vantage in both signal conversion and local - 
oscillator noise reduction. In the final resolu- 
tion, a single active balanced mixer using a 
pair of 2N5485 JFETs into a 50-Ohm config- 
u rat ion was selected. 

The 24-to-28-MHz output from the TS-940 
has a peak-to-peak output of about 100 mW. 
The L26 volts measured is about 31 mW 
rms. Its input to the mixer is at the 50-Ohm 
tap on the input toroid (L2). The 45 mW from 
the LI 3 tap from the Q7 stage provides a 
120-MHz mixer output of approximately 0.5 
volts rms. 

The mixer potentiometer (R) should be ad- 
justed for minimum 120-MHz signal in the 
mixer output. This should be observed on a 
scope or spectrum analyzer. If none is avail- 
able, adjust the source resistance in Q8 to 
equal that in Q9. 

The mixer output is amplified through 
three 120-MHz linear-amplifier stages. The 
Q10 stage at its low impedance output is 0.75 
V rms. The output at a similar point at Q1I 
measures 2.0 volts rms. Each of these two 
stages uses 2N9I8 bipolar transistors. The 
third hard linear biased stage uses a 2N3866. 
The linear output measures between 400 and 
500 mill i wans. When the 10-Ohm emitter 
resistor is paralleled with another of equal 
value, the output increases by another 100 
mW. With the emitter connected directly to 
ground, the output is between 850 and 950 
mW depending on the supply voltage of 12.5 
and 13.5 voks. A small heat-sink hat should 
be placed on the 2N3866. The transistor nor- 
mally runs cool to the touch but will heat up 
when swr is present. 

Up to this point, the transverter was pow- 



38 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



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F/g. 5. VMOS-power power amplifier. 



ered with a 1.2-Ampere hour 12-volt gell 
cell, and a range of 40 miles was conducted 
on SSB AM and FM during a test program. 



VMOS Power FET 60-Watl Amplifier 

The DU-1240T and 1260T are N -channel 
MOS power FETs operating in an enhance- 
ment mode, and they have generated one of 
the most interesting aspects of this program: 
VMOS— vertical metal oxide semiconductor 
field effect transistor. Up until a short time 
ago, VMOS was entirely new to me. These 
devices are not similar to bipolar transistors; 
they are more like vacuum tubes , but differ- 



ent from both. As examples: Bipolar tran- 
sistors have low input and output imped- 
ances. The input and outputs look inductive; 
the hotter they get, the more current they 
draw, and thus they get hotter until they self- 
destruct. 

VMOS or MOS power FETs are high- 
impedance devices (possibly higher than vac- 
uum tubes), are capacitive devices rather than 
inductive, and the hotter they get, the less 
current they draw until they shut themselves 
off. Bipolar transistors are made for specific 
operating frequencies. As these devices have 
much more gain at lower frequencies, they 



are prone to self-oscillate at the lower fre- 
quencies; therefore, the voltage supply cir- 
cuits must contain filters and bypassing for 
both high and low frequencies or else they 
will burn up. 

VMOS, on the other hand, has a very 
flat frequency gain response and can be 
used at any frequency below the highest 
design frequency. Ideally, a 500-MHz unit 
can also be used at any low frequency. 
It is common to see a 400- or 175-MHz 
VMOS transistor used in a broadband 2- 
to-30-MHz amplifier. They can be biased 
for class A, B, C\ D, and E operation. Oth- 



d b 



T 



ct 



© 



PAD 







i 



ETL_i 



Wit HO 




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INTERNA 



Fig. 6. Approximate orientation of major components for the power amplifier. 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 39 






er than for low signal levels, bipolar de- 
vices cannot be used in class A operation 
and for the most part are made to operate 
in class C. Most manufacturers state that 
you cannot destroy a VMOS device by over- 
driving, and some will not admit to sudden 



failure in a new design because of oscillation. 
In order to make a VMOS operate in class 
A or B, it is necessary to set up a quiescent 
drain current level by biasing the high- 
impedance input gate with a positive dc 
voltage level, The gate circuit has a thin bar- 





DV-1210S 


DLM240T 


DU-1 260T 


V GS 


i D (Amperes) 


v Ga 


Id (A) 


V GB 


In (A) 


1.5 V 


0.0 


2.0 V 


0.0 


1.5 V 


0.0 


2.0 


0.020 


2.1 


0.100 


2,0 


0.500 


3,0 


0.200 


3.0 


0.600 


3.0 


2,0 


4.0 


0.550 


4,0 


1.5 


4.0 


4.0 


5.0 


1.0 


5.0 


3.0 


5.0 


6.0 


6.0 


1,5 


6.0 


4.0 


6.0 


9.0 


7.0 


2.0 


7.0 


6.0 


8,0 


10.5 


8.0 


2.5 


8.0 


7.5 


10.0 


11.0 


9,0 


3.0 


10,0 


10.0 


12,0 


12.0 


10,0 


3.5 










12,0 


4,5 











Table 1. Typical transfer characteristics: I D drain current versus V G5 gate voltage (drain 
voltage of 12.5 volts. 



IfcPuT 
13 .0 VOLTS 



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13.0 VOLTS 



$ 



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TO ALL 
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A 51 



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SIDE OF TRANS- 
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LEVEL MODULE. 




— TO OSCSLLiTOH CHAIN 



TO PIN 4 ON B PIN CONNECTOR PLUG 
TO RECEIVER MIKER f24- TO 2&-MHI OUTPUT] 
TO PIN S ON DIN PLUG 



♦ TO PIN B ON D*N PLUS 



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CONVERTER P.F CIRCUIT 



W V. Y I 



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8 PIN PLUG. 
ACTIVATES ON 
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THE NUMBER OF PARALLELED 
H PINS DEPENDS ON CONTACT 
CURRENT CARRY J NG CAPACITY 



MQT£: 51 TRIPLE POLE DOUBLE 
THROW SWITCH 15 LOCATED ON 
THE LOW LEVEL TRANSMITTER 
MODULE ALONG WITH THE 8 PIN 
MIK£ TYPE JACK 



I J VOLT LENE TO POWER 
AMPLIFIER UPON 
TRANSMIT 



Fig. 7. Wiring and relay-switching diagram. Pins to the framverter plug on the TS-940S: 1 and 
3— ground for coax shields; 2 — 12 volts @ 50 mA on xmit; 4—transvener on/off switch; 5—Rx 
signal from converter; 6— ALC external; 7— rf output to Tx mixer, 24 to 28 MHz (yfo); 8 — 940S 
HF receiver signal connects to pin 5 for normal xmit operation of 940 on HF (connects to RY3)> 



rier wall to the source. Self-oscillation can 
break down this wall in a few milliseconds, 
destroying the little devils. In a new circuit, 
they may have to be tamed. 

Another feature that differs from the vacu- 
um tube or bipolar transistor is that a common 
spec for mismatch tolerance is 30: 1 vswr, 
The standard practice of M/A-Com Phi* Inc., 
one manufacturer of VMOS, is to test all of 
their production devices at an swr of 20:1. 
Junction temperature of the devices is 200° C 
{392° F). Nominal power gain is 10 dB; 
efficiency is 60% or better. 

The three devices selected for use in 
this amplifier were the M/A-Com DV- 
12108, DU-1240T, and DU-1260T* all 12- 
volt devices with linear output levels of 
10, 40, and 60 Watts, respectively. Oper- 
ating voltage is 12 J volts. Maximum voltage 
for the drain is 45 V, source 30 V; total 
maximum device dissipation is 160 W and 
240 W, respectively, for the 40- and 60- 
Watt units, On the 60-Watt unit V GS , the 
gate to source bias voltage of 4 volts will 
produce a 6,0 Ampere quiescent drain cur- 
rent. (See Fig. 8.) 

Physical Placement of Components 

It is important to connect both top and bot- 
tom foil surfaces of the PC board together at a 
number of points around the perimeter and at 
two points near the source of both power 
transistors. Drill #55 or smaller holes and 
feed a small gauge tinned wire through each 
hole; solder on both sides of the board. 

It will be necessary to cut rectangular holes 
in the board for the heat sink of both transis- 
tors. Allow just enough clearance for the 
transistor mounting to pass through the hole. 
There should not be more than 1/16" overall 
clearance— that's l/32 ff all around. 

Mount the transistors with H^O thread ma- 
chine screws. This means careful drilling and 
tapping. Take it easy and use a lubricant when 
tapping. The DV-1210S transistor package 
has four terminals with a cross configuration 
in respect to the heat-sink mounting; there- 
fore, the rectangular hole will be 45 degrees 
to the line of input/output. 

The DU- 1 240T and 1 260T transistors have 
six tabs. The outer four tabs are the source, 



TYPICAL OUTPUT POWER V5 INPUT POWER 



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CLASS C 






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POWER INPUT (WATT SI 



IS 



rt 



Fig. 8. Power input versus power output for the DV-1201S. DU-1240T, and DU-I26QT, plotted with data from Table 1. 



40 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



and eventually get soldered to the top foil. 
The cutout for these transistors is at right 
angles to the direction of component layout 

Referencing the schematic (Fig. 5), you 
will notice a rectangular box at both the gate 
and drain of each transistor. This is a small 
strip line inductance etched into the foil. You 
might wonder why this is not made up like a 
large solder pad. The additional 1/16" board 
thickness would put a strain on the transistor 
labs. The PC board is already raised above 
the heat sink by about 3/32" , or almost the 
thickness of two boards less foil. You do not 
want the PC board material to pick up the 
radiated heat from the heat-sink material. If 
you want to experiment, you will have to 
reduce the board clearance by about 1/16*\ 
The rectangular inductances are called out as 
LI A and L2A on the driver stage and are 
about 1/2" long, L3B and L4B on the more 
critical final are 1 ■ long. 

On the final stage, it will be necessary to 
taper the ends of the inductors closest to the 
gate and drain so that the grounded source 
tabs do not touch them and short the gate or 
drain. It is also prudent to make a diagonal cut 
away of the source tab material on the inner 
edge of all four tabs. 

Note the resistor *R at the gale of DU~ 
1260. This was necessary to set up a negative 
feedback voltage to prevent oscillation. Take 
three 10-Ohm carbon 1/4-Wan resistors and 
prepare them as follows: 

Cut one end to a length of approximately 
5/32" and bend it at a right angle to the 
resistor body. Bend the other end back along 
the body of the resistor, approximately 3/8". 
Bend the gate transistor tab upward 90°. The 
3/8" lead of each of these resistors is sweat- 
soldered to ihe rectangular inductance, and 
the resistors stand vertically up from the 
board. These may not be necessary If the 
stage is stable. I used them with the 40- Walt 
device, but the 60-Watt device required more 
drive, which was reduced with the resistors in 
the circuit. I did not use them in the 60- Watt 
amplifier. 

The Unelco or Underwood nonmductive 
1 00-pF C8 and C9 capacitor tabs are soldered 
to the center of the rectangular inductance, 
one capacitor on either side (across from one 
another with tabs almost touching). Solder 
the capacitor cases to the foil ground. CIO 
(100 pF) connects to the midpoint of L4B. 
The RFC3 connects midway between the C 10 
tab and the drain. CI I (22-pF) connects to 
one comer of MB. The coil (L4) connects at 
a point next to the CI 1 connection. You will 
need a 1/2" x 1/4" solder lab placed in a 
direction inboard and at right angles to the 
input end of L4B. 

There arc four components with one of 
their ends connected to the pad: ihe output 
end of L4. C12, CI 3, and C14. If the output 
harmonic filter is incorporated, CIS will be a 
10-pF fixed disc ceramic NPO. If not, this 
becomes a 3-20 (approximately) variable mi- 
ca compression trimmer (Arco #422 or 
equivalent), 

I did not incorporate this filter in my de- 
sign. Instead, I made up a separate module 
using BNC connectors and a T filter picked 

"When You Buy. Say 73" 





Receiver Converter Major Components Parts List 




C1,C2 


1-7*pF miniature piston type 




C3, C7, C8, 




C15, CI 6 2-12*pF 8-plate E. F. Johnson or equivalent 




C4 


3-1 8-pF pJated air capacitor or equivalent 




C5 


4-20-pF 14-plate £. F. Johnson air capacitor or equivalent 




C9. C10 f C14 Mmiaiure flat-wafer-type 7-40-pF variable 




C11 


4-35~Jeaf postage-stamp-type variable Arco or equivalent 




L0 


See text for variations on coil L0 in oscillator 




L1,L3 


7 turns #16 tapped at 1-1/2 turns from ground end 




L2 


32 turns #24 on T-50-1 2 toroid core or 27 turns 026 on T-37-10 






core{1 pF on L2 can be a low selected value to set the 88-MHz notch.) 




L4 


5 turns #10. 5/32" tapped at 1-1/4 turns and 1-3/4 turns from ground end 


L5 


5 turns #18 wound on the threads of a 1/4" 20-bolt tapped at 3/4 
turns from ground end 




L6 


5 turns 01 B h 5/32" diameter tapped at 1-1/4 and 1-3/4 from low end 




L7 


5 turns 018, on 1/4" 20 bolt 




I L8 


4 turns 018, on 1/4" 20 bolt set at right angles with L7 




L9 


15 turns 028, on T-25-6 Amidon toroid core 




L10 


1 4 turns 028, on T-25-6 Amidon toroid core tapped at 4 turns 




L11 


1 5 turns 01 8 on T-50-1 2 core 




L12 


4 turns 01 8 on T50-1 2 core tapped at 1 turn 




L13 


4 turns #1 8 on 1 /4" 1 2 x 20 bolt tapped at 1/4 and 1/2 turn from 
ground end 




QVQ2 


2N5485 or 2N54S6 or equivalent JFETs 




Q3 


40673 dual-gate MOSFET or equivalent 




04 


2N3563 




Q5 


2N4221 JFET or equivalent 




Q6 


2N9 18 or equivalent 






Low-Level Transmitter Major Components Parts List 




L1 


7 turns 1/8" #18 enameled wire, 1/8" inside diameter close wound 




L2 


27 turns, #22 enameled wire tapped at 14 turns, wound on T-50-1 2 




L3 


core 
5 turns #18, 3/8" tapped at 3/4 turn on cold end 




L4 


5-1/4 turns 018, 3/8" diameter tapped at 1/2 and 1-1/2 turns 
from hot end 




L5 


.56-uH RFC 




L6 


4turns#18 t 9/32 " diameter tapped at 1-1/2 and 2-1/2 turns 
from hot end 




L7 


3 turns #18, 1/8" diameter 




L8 


10 turns #28 enameled, on a 62-Ohm 1 /2-Watt resistor 




L9 


5 turns #18, 1/4" diameter 




L10 


6-hole ferrite 043 material. .394" long and .236 o.d, or 073 material 
.437" long and .062 o.d, (Amidon Associates or equivalent, 
3 turns #28 wire) 




RFC1 


1uH 




RFC2 


.56 UH 




CI 


56 pF to broadband resonate L2. 24 to 28 MHz 




C2-C5 


2-1 2-pF 8-plate E. F. Johnson 1 89-503-45 or equivalent 




C6-G1I 


3 7-45 or 7-50 leaf*type mica compression trimmers type 403 or 






235-7345-P026 Arco #422 or #426 or equivalent 




Q7 


2N2222 




Q8,Q9 


2N5465 or 2 N 5486 




Q10.Q 


11 2N918 




Q12 


2N3866 

1 miniature TPDT switch 




1-8 


Pin special DIN plug from Kenwood 




1*8 


Pin mike jack, male from Henry Radio 




1-8 


Pin mike plug, female from Henry Radio 




RY3 


4-pole double-throw 12-volt (small RY with stout contacts) 




RY2 


SPOT 12-volt (heavy gold-flashed contacts) 




RY1 


A smafl relay similar to RY2 to be situated in the power amplifier for 




1 N40O 
Except 


antenna switching 
t or 1 N40Q5 3 each, to be used as transient suppressors across the relay coils 

for critical circuits, most values of capacitors and resistors are ±30%. 





73 Amateur Radio ■ July. 1987 41 



Power MOS Amplifier Major Components Parts List 

DV-121QS power MOS transistor. M/A Com Phi. Inc. 

DLM240T or DLM260T as above 

4 turns #22, close wound, irtT inside diameter (enameled) 

3 turns #20, close wound, 1/8" inside diameter (enameled) 

3 turns #20. 5/32" diameter, enameled, close wound 

2 turns #20, 5/32* diameter enameled. 5/32" diameter 

Rlter optional, 2-1/2 turns #20, 5/32" inside diameter 

Are strip line inductances etched or scribed into the PC board material, 

1/2* x 1/4* 
Are strip line 1 " x 1/4" in PC board 

8 turns #20 enameled, 1/4" inside diameter, close wound 

9 turns #20, 5/32* inside diameter, close wound 
Small compression mica trimmer capacitors Arco or equivalent 
Small compression trimmer as above, 15-80 pF 
As above in 4-40 pF 
As above in 3-30 approx, 
10-pF disc ceramic short leads 
100 pF Underwood, Unelco, or other non-inductive leadless 

capacitor 
Can be variable 
22-pF short lead disc ceramic 
3-20 compression mica capacitor (1 * size body), preferably if 

running 60 Watts 
Arco303N 10-80 pF 
3-25-pF303N 10-80 pF 
10-pF NPO disc ceramic 
15-pF mica ceramic 
.001 disc ceramic 
1*uF tantalum 

470-pF disc ceramic or short-tead dipped silver mica 
See Text, 3 each 10-Ohrn t/4-Watt carbon resistors 
500-pF low-inductive capacitor 

Use .001 disc ceramics in the 1 3-volt line whenever entering a new branch. 

Underwood/Semco metal-dad noninductive rf mica capacitors and other hard-to-locate 
items are available from Communications Concepts, Inc., 2S48 North Aragon Avenue, 
Dayton OH 45420. 



01 
02 
L1 

12 
L3 
L4 
L5, L6 

L1A.L2A 

L3B. L4B 
RFCt 
RFC2, RFC3 

C1.C2 

C3 

C4 

C5.C6 

C7.C12 

C8-C10 

C10 
C11 
C13 

C14 

C15 

C16.C18.C19 

C17 

C20 

C21 

C22 T C23 
■R 

*C 



out of the fourth edition of the RSCH VI IF/ 
UHF Manual, chapter?. {Modified T fitter — 
Two 1/2 "-diameter 4- turn coils spaced 3/8" 
on a single winding of #14 tinned wire, spac- 
ing of one wire diameter between turns. A 
2-22 -pF Arco capacitor from junction to 
ground. Case made of double-sided PC 
board, 2-14" xl" x 1-1/4* outside dimen- 
sions. Ends of coils grounded to sides of case 
just below 6NC connectors. End coils tapped 
at 3/4 turn, each connected to a BNC connec- 
tor. Tap should be matched for 50 Ohms 
using Bird 43 power meter and 50-Ohrn ter- 
mination and reflected power mode. Output 
of coil finally matched to antenna filter is 
tuned to center of 2-MHz band segment prior 
to the optimum adjustments, i 

A r high double-sided shield is placed 
lengthwise between the driver stage and the 
final . A short length of RG- J 74 or belter 1 /8 " 
coax runs from the output of Ql to the input 
of Q2, 

After verification that you have the proper 
output from the 3866 stage, power up the 
driver stage of the amplifier only. First, tem- 
porarily terminate the 1210 stage with a 50- 
Ohm resistor. Set the gate voltage to about 
3.5 to 3,8 volts for a drain current .of 400 mA. 

At this point, you could really use two Bird 
43 power meters as you want to adjust Q 1 for 

42 73 Amateur Radio • July. 1987 



maximum output. I suggest applying only 
about 11.0 volts to the Q 1 stage. Monitor the 
temperature of the 3866. Adjust the input of 
Ql. CI. and C2 for minimum swr to the 
3866, Once the input is adjusted, the 
wattmeter is placed in the output of Ql and 
adjusted for 5 Watts output. Adjust the 10k 
gate voltage pot to set the output, See Fig. 8 
and Table 1 for plots and data of output ver- 
sus drain current. Connect the RG-174 coax 
to the input of Q2 (remove the 50-Ohm resis- 
tor load). 

The final amplifier is adjusted with the 
power meter connected to the output of the 
amplifier. This adjustment is easier than the 
lower stages as we have no concern with swr 
when using VMOS. Just adjust C5, C6, C4, 
and CIS for maximum output. Apply operat- 
ing voltage and adjust gate voltage for proper 
quiescent drain current and power output. 
And, yes, the 2N3866 transistor still operates 
linear unless it gets very hot. 

At 400 or 500 mW. I still recommend the 
small heat sink; 400 mW runs very cool and is 
sufficient to drive the amplifier to its full 
nominal output of either 40 or 60 Watts de- 
pending on the output transistor chosen. 

VMOS Power Amplifier 
I am so enthused by the improvement of 



MOS power operation over that of bipolar 
transistors and, yes, even to that of vacuum 
tubes that I predict that within the not -too-dis- 
tant future we will witness an almost com- 
plete replacement of bipolar transistors by the 
use of VMOS or UMOS technology . From 
what I understand, UMOS is just an improve- 
ment in the MOSFET technology thai has 
evolved into the standard— a vertical planar 
four-layer semiconductor process called 
DMOS or double-diffused MOS. 

The manufacturer's specification sheets 
emphasize the following features for VMOS 
power FETs in the N-channel enhancement: 
infinite vswr: no thermal runawav: broad- 
band capability; class A, B, C, D, and E; low 
noise figure; high dynamic range (typical 10 
dB); simple bias circuitry; and no problem 
finding devices to 120 Watts and linear to 500 
MHz at 12 and 28 volts. Units of 100 volts to 
150 Watts at 175 MHz with 17 dB of gain are 
also available. 

Final Construction Notes 

The measurements given for the place- 
ment of the shield can be varied, Don't for- 
get to drill holes or notches in the di- 
vider shields to accommodate feedthrough 
wiring, before you solder the separators in 
place. A nice thing about this type of con- 
struction is that should you change your mind 
for the position of a solder pad once it has 
been put in place, you can remove it by 
prying it up with a sharp thin screwdriver. 
Sometimes it takes a little doing as this glue 
really holds. 

You might at this point note that RY2 and 
RY3 are both located on the bottom of the 
tow-level transmitter module, while RYL 
the antenna relay, is mounted on the power 
amplifier board in the shielded compartment 
with the driver transmitter QL The re- 
lays having plastic cases are held in place 
with double-backed tape. Yes, it holds very 
securely, 

The Ql first grounded-gate receiver am- 
plifier stage along with the bandpass fil- 
ter and the .88-MHz filter are located on 
the bottom of the converter module. Also 
on the bottom side are some components 
of the local-oscillator stage— source volt- 
age filters, the oscillator 12-volt regulator 
chip, the oscillator bias resistors, the L0 
inductor, and the C12 oscillator tuning ca- 
pacitor. 

The 1 2 -volt oscillator regulator was used to 
stabilize the oscillator frequency. It was 
found that the oscillator frequency would 
shift a couple hundred cycles if the main 
power-supply voltage was variably set to 
12,5 V, 13.0 V, or 13 + 5 V— the main supply 
necessary to supply the voltage and current 
(power) to the final amplifier. 

There is a considerable amount of ex- 
tra room on the bottom side of this module. 
The 78L12 regulator chip can actually go 
almost anywhere thereon. I placed it close to 
one of the feedthrough capacitors furnishing 
voltage to the oscillator chain. Like the Q4 
oscillator, it also regulates Q5 and Q6 of this 
chain. 

The oscillator chain voltage remains on 



during both transmit and receive. Receiver 
front-end source voltage is removed during 
the transmit mode, while source vokage to 
the transmit stages is removed during re- 
ceive. Refer to the relay circuit for the 
voltage distribution cycle. 

You will note that the first rf stage has the 
output circuit isolated by a shield. It might be 
prudent to flip the physical positioning of the 
two sections as this will shorten the RG-174 
coax to a fraction of an inch in length. There 
has been no problem from this; it just makes a 
belter layout to flip the sections. 

Transmitter Low-Level 
Linear Amplifier 

The 13- volt supply line is well-filtered not 
only in the low-level linear amplifier module, 
but also through the entire transverter. You 
may have noted the high quantity of + 001-uF 
capacitors used. These are small disc ceram- 
ics with a 100-volt de rating. All resistors 
throughout are 1/4 Watt unless specifically 
shown otherwise. 

The low-level amplifier has an output 
power of 400 mW. The Q 12 2N3866 pres- 
ently has a IG-Ohm resistor in the emit- 
ter. This value can be reduced to zero if 
needed. By shunting a second 10-Ohm 
1/4-Watt resistor to that already in the 
emitter, you can increase the power output 
to 600 mW. Placing the emitter directly to 
ground increases the output to 0,8 Watts 
or 0.9 Watts when feeding the VMOS am- 
plifier input at low swi\ If* however, the 
swr rises, the Q12 transistor will heat up. A 
small heat -sink hat should be placed around 
the case. 

Tuning Notes 

Since the transmitter is more broadband- 
ed than the receiver, it covers the full 4 
MHz easily when adjusted at the band cen- 
ter. The receiver will cover the full 4 
MHz, but will lose resonance at the band 
ends. If your greater interests are with 
OSCAR 10 and single sideband, peak the 
receiver rf stages for 145 MHz to efficient- 
ly cover 144 to 146 MHz. Now, even though 
there will be some gain sacrificed at the 
high end, the power of the repeaters in this 
band segment will overcome the small loss 
in gain. 

If there is anything of question that I have 
not included, feel free to drop me an SASE 
with your comments and questions, I am 
quite sure that once involved with this pro- 
ject, you will find it most enjoyable and will 
discover the real rewards of operating in any 
mode.B 

References 

"VHF/UHF World/' Joe Reisert W1JR, 
Ham Radio, August, 1985. 

"Power FETs: Trend for VHF Amplifiers," 
Robert S, Larkin W7PUA, Ham Radio* Janu- 
ary, 1984. 

"Solid State SSB Exciter," Robert E, Bloom 
W6YUY, 73, December, 1970. 

''Design a Toroidal Tank Circuit for Your 
Vacuum Tube Amplifier," Robert E. Bloom 
W6YUY, Ham Radio, August, 1985. 

"When You Buy, Say 73" 




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■ Wrong Digit Reset- Minimizes the chance of 
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73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 43 





PACKET 

K 1 TE can control a packet station from 
his desk or anywhere in the world — with 
a little help from a mainframe computer. 



Brodshaw B. Lupton, Jr. KITE 
227 Maple A venue 
Shrewsbury MA 01545 

I fell in love with packet radio the first time I 
sat down at a terminal and gave it a whirl* 
The commute time repeater talk gave no 
hint about thrills available. Protocol, hard- 
ware t and software discussions were a big 
yawn. I spend all day with that stuff. To 
connect or not to connect, that was the 
question. 

First Time 

My first experience with packet was 
with the Honeywell W1DC 1200 Radio 
Club TNC-2, 2m rig, and VIP78I3 ter- 
minal (Fig, I) during lunch in the club 
room. KA1MI walked me through the 
power-up procedures and parameter set- 
tings, then explained how to connect to the 
KIBC and WA1RAJ BBSs {computer bul- 
letin boards accessible only via packet ra- 
dio). These BBSs are accessible from our 
Rillcrica, Massachusetts, plant on 145.090 
MHz. The 7813 terminal was exciting be- 
cause it is one of the series of terminals 
that my communications software is de- 
signed to support. Previously, all I had 
ever seen on the 7813 terminal was boring 
old customer-type displays. Numbers, or- 
ders, banking, databases, dumps, yucch. 
Seeing ham calls, satellite info, requests 
for help, answers to the requests, even ARRL 
bulletins coming across the screen was too 
good to be true. 

Modem Access 

My first challenge was how to make the 
fun of the lunch hour available outside of 
the club room. Very fortunately, the 78 13 
terminal has an auxiliary RS-232 port. Con- 
necting a R1XON 212A modem to the aux- 
iliary port and commandeering the WIDC 
repeater phone forced me to split my 



afternoon into two work breaks surround- 
ing some very serious serial communica- 
tion (Fig. 2). (I have one Honeywell PC, 
two Honeywell 6/ 10s with MS-DOS, one 
VIP720K three phone lines, four modems, 
two 9600-baud modem bypasses to net- 
work facilities, hundreds of feet of RS-232 
cable, and the constant evil eye of the safe- 
ty committee.) Returning the repeater phone 
to normal operation left me with an empty 
feeling. 

Neat Stuff 

During the time that the TNC-2 was avail- 
able by modem, I tried hooking up my 
Honeywell PC with both public-domain 
and proprietary terminal emulators. I ac- 
cessed the K I BC board and practiced send- 
ing and receiving mail automatically. 1 
sent my first transcontinental mail to 
NK6K. Three days later I got my response. 
Electronic mail from MA to CA takes about 
6 hours and about 4 hops. Pretty neat 
for a reliable and FREE service. The mo- 
dem access to the packet board leads nat- 
urally into the idea of modem bypass (just 
a pair of electronic thingies to turn mul- 
tiple hundred feet of wire into an RS- 
232 connection). I approached KA1MVM 
with the idea of setting up a modem by- 
pass from our largest multi-user mainframe 
to the packet board. The connection would 
be a one-way connection to be used by a 
user logged onto the mainframe. The user 
would use mainframe connect function- 
ality to the port that is modem-bypassed to the 
club room. 

Mainframe Access 

It didn't take too long a sales pitch to get 
the wires run from the mainframe to the 
club room. We hooked the modem bypass 
to the auxiliary port on the terminal, then ran 
off to another office to dial into the main- 
frame and see how it worked (Fig. 3). It 






;-j — 

Mtttt 



2 



PH- 



Ftg, 1. The WfDC packet station. 



B5EK 
\ 

\ 

HOBEH - 



— T»e~i~ 1 

PACKET 
• - phtmp Lin* ■ 



FH«**-~rACKET 
HETTOV 

HODEH 

\ 
TSIMINAL 

\ 
USE* 



Fig. 2. The Wt DC packet station with modem 



^ 



\ 



-2 ttftft fH-—f*C*r! 






mem itmu-- 



\ 

TBI HAlUf-lAMI 

OPHWTEt 

t \ 

\ 



L 



Fig. 3. The W1DC packet station with main- 
frame access. 



era 
v 

TEHtlHM 

MODEM ftr?AS£ . HOOCH tTt*$$ 



THOZ- *-t HtTff *H PACKET 

PACKET HCTVMJt 



J 

TIMET 

I \ 
I 



r 

t K 



1 



t \ 

rati | otu 
I 1 

HIPiriAHE HIMIFIAH.- 

/ \ \ 

HQBEH OKI TOEI HOCtt 

; \ 

IftIR UF£B 



THE HfrLPFBAME 

OUHHJIil 

' \ 

ton v 

PC or 



\ 



UATAPAC (Canada) USE* 

PSS (U,K.}_UEER 

---AtfSmC JAuitnlii)-- — -USER 



Fig. 4. The WWC packet station with world 
access. 



"We have LANs, 

WANs, DSAs, RNP6s, 

SNAs r and tons of other 

acronyms that can be 

connected to the 

packet system. ff 



worked perfectly. The TNC-2 board, 2m 
rig* and piggyback connection to the 78 13 are 

now accessible from the mainframe. We can 
connect from the mainframe using the Wl DC 
packet station as a one-at-a-time shared 
resource. 

Security 

Once the access was available, KA1MVM 
(a mainframe system administrator) took 



44 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



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VOLTAGE 28A max/22A cont. 6-30V Variable 

Your station's performance starts 
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output). 3) PB-3 7 2 V 800 mAH NiCd batt. pack 
it 5 W output). 4) PB-4 7.2 V 1600 mAH NiCd batt 
pack (1.5 W output) 5) BT-5 AA manganese/alkaline 
battery case ©j BC-7 Rapid charger tor PB-1, 2. 3. 
Of 4. 7) BC-6 Compact battery charger 
8) SMC-30 Speaker microphone. 9) SC-12, SC 13 
Soft cases, 10) RA-3, RA-5 Telescoptng antennas. 
It) RA-8B StubbyDuk antenna • TSU-3 CTCSS 
encode/decode unit • VB-2530 2 m, 25 W Rf 
power booster * LH-4 + LH-5 Leather gases * MB-4 
Mobile bracket * BH-5 Swivel mouni. • PG-2V DC 
cable * PG-3C Filtered agar lighter cord 

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Communications &Test Equipment Group 
2201 E. Domingue2 SL Long Beach. CA 90810 



over the task of collecting copies of the li- 
censes of the hams who wished to participate. 
The mainframe has B2 security, B2 security 
is an excellent rating from the standards set 
by the Department of Defense, The standards 
rate just how hard it is to break the defenses of 
the computer. This security is very tight and 
we feel that it provides more than reasonable 
protection against improper usage of the 
packet station. This article has been secu- 
rity screened to make sure that I don't 
give away the keys to the farm in the pro- 
cess. The mainframe is purposefully not 
identified. In truth, any of our mainframes 
or minis or maxi-micros or whatever the 
marketing types are selling them as can give 
a connection to a 1200-baud asynchronous 
7- or 8-bit line thai is perfectly connectable to 
a packet system, We have LANs, WANs, 
DSAs, RNP6s, SNAs, and tons of other 
acronyms that can be connected to the pack- 
et system. 

Non-Ham Access 

To take another step into the bigger 
picture, we have included the general Hon- 
eywell mainframe community into en- 
joyment of packet radio. Honeywell has 
^electronic meeting' software that al- 
lows any number of people to participate 
in an ongoing meeting resident on the 
mainframe. You attend the meeting at 
any time you wish while logged on the 
mainframe. You can enter messages in- 
to a meeting in the same way that you 
leave messages on a BBS. The difference 
is that there can be hundreds of different 
meetings and topics available on the main- 
frame „ as opposed to the single * fc meeting ' * on 
the BBS. Also, the BBS has many selective 
messages directed from one ham to another, 
while the ^electronic meeting' is available 
to all who attend. Here on our mainframe we 
can connect to the packet system in such a 
way as to capture a file containing all the 
information that went by the screen. After 
disconnecting from the packet board, we can 
edit the "capture file* and place annotated 
sections into the **W1DC electronic meet- 
ing' for all to enjoy. Our "electronic meet- 
ing* on the mainframe is the place to air 
problems, resolutions, general bulletins, club 
information, etc. , for ham and non-ham alike 
to enjoy . 

World Access 

The present/future configuration of our 
world access plan is shown in Fig. 4- Our 
mainframe is accessible by a variety of net- 
work connections- TYMNET is a paid public 
network connection that provides character- 
by -character transfer from a remote user at a 
terminal to and from the mainframe comput- 
er* The TYMNET user can be anywhere in 
the USA or possessions and use a modem to 
dial a local telephone number in the nearest 
major city (and many minor ones as well)* 
TYMNET is merely acting as the carrier of 
the data in much the same way as the phone 
company is acting as the data carrier if you 
convert your data into sound with your 
modem* 



Bigger Picture 

Stepping back even further; TYMNET 
is connected with similar paid public net- 
works in major countries worldwide* I have 
used DATAPAC in Canada and PSS in the 
U.fC to access the mainframe during busi- 
ness trips. On my next business trip I will 
have the choice of accessing the Wl DC pack- 
et station from anywhere on earth. The paid 
data networks will transport my keystrokes 
from my distant earthly location to beau- 
tiful downtown Billerica, Massachusetts* 
If I choose, I may use the mainframe con- 
nect function to pass my keystrokes to the 
piggyback connection on the VIP7813 termi- 
nal in the club room at the top of the tower 
building. 

Piggyback 

The piggyback connection is a really neat 
thing in itself, If I am in Timbuktu, go- 
ing through this monster connection, con- 
nected to the auxiliary port of the 7813, I 
can work in parallel with the local oper- 
ator. What he types* character by charac- 
ter, appears on the local screen AND on 
mine in Timbuktu* What I type he sees. Ac- 
tually* the character I type travels the en- 
tire route to the packet board where it is 
echoed back. The echoed character goes to 
the local screen AND out the auxiliary port, 
over hill and dale, to my screen, it is easy 
to double- * .1 can obliterate what the local 
operator is typing. This is handy for inter- 
rupting and asking the local operator a ques- 
tion. The line can be deleted and it will never 
go out over the air. This is handy for chang- 
ing frequency on the 2m rig from 12,000 
miles away. 

Legally Speaking 

I maintain that this world access network is 
proper and secure use of amateur radio- The 
mainframe is manned 24 hours a day, 365.25 
days per year. The station can be shut down 
from a number of locations along the path* 
Foremost, the operator at the keyboard IS in 
control, as certainly as if he were at the local 
keyboard, In the event of network failure* the 
security department is a phone call away and 
can yank the power to the packet room, Even 
though a non-ham is pulling the plug, it is at 
the express direction of a licensed amateur. 
This is wonderful stuff if used in the right 
spirit. 

KITE Philosophy 

I was won over by the concept of ^elec- 
tronic meetings* ' on the mainframe long be- 
fore I encountered packet radio. I found a 
great deal of fun and help available by both 
reading meetings and asking questions in 
those meetings- If you have a question* ask it. 
Let the question ferment a couple of days on 
an ' 'electronic meeting* ' or BBS and see what 
comes of it* Maybe it needs rewording. May- 
be you will be given a thread of the answer to 
follow to another place. There is a lot of 
information available from a lot of sources 
worldwide* and packet radio is a terrific way 
tap into it. ■ 




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CIRCLE 259 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * July t 1987 49 




ARTER 'N' BUY 



MILITARY TECHNICAL MANUALS 

for old and obsolete equipment. 80- 
page catalog, $5. Military Technical 
Manual Service, 2266 Senasac Ave., 
Long Beach CA 9081 5. BNB045 

MARINE RADIO: Marconi Canada CH- 
125 synthesized AM/SSB transceiver, 
22 channels on 4 t 8, and 12 MHz, 125 
Watts, 1 2 V dc. Never used, list $1 ,995. 
asking $1,495. Stu Norwood, 70 Rte. 
202 North, Peterborough NH 03458. 
BNB047 

QSLs to order. Variety of styles, colors, 
card stock. W4BPD QSLs, PO Drawer 
DX, Cordova SC 29039. BNB260 

THE OXERS MAGAZINE. Up-to-date, 
informative, interesting. Compiled and 
edited by Gus Browning W4BPD, DX- 
CC Honor Roll Certificate 2-4. Send 
for free sample and subscription infor- 
mation today, PO Drawer DX. Cordova 
SC 29039, BNB261 

RADIO TRANSCRIPTION DISCS 
WANTED. Any size, speed, W7FIZ— 
WG, Box 724, Redmond WA 98073- 
0724. BNB347 

XEROX MEMORYWRITER-parts. 
assemblies, boards, manuals. Free 
help with service problems, W6NTH, 
Box 250, Benton AR 7201 5; (501 )-776- 
0920, BNB404 

HAM TRADER YELLOW SHEETS, in 
Our 24th year. Buy, swap, sell ham-ra- 
dio gear. Published twice a month. Ads 
quickly circulate— no long wait for re- 
sults. SASE for sample copy, $12 for 
one year (24 issues), PO Box 2057, 
Glen Ellyn I L 60138-2057, 8NB412 

QSL CARDS— Look good with top 
quality printing. Choose standard de- 
signs or fully customized cards, Better 
cards mean more returns to you. Free 



brochure, samples. Stamps appreciat- 
ed. Chester QSLs, Dept. A, 310 Com- 
mercial, Emporia KS66801. BNB434 

YAESU OWNERS— Hundreds of mod- 
ifications and improvements for your 
rig, Select the best from 1 4 years of 
genuine top-rated Fox-Tango Newslet- 
ters by using our new 32-page Cumula- 
tive Index. Only $5 postpaid (cash or 
check) with $4 rebate certificate cred- 
itable toward newsletter purchases. In- 
cludes famous Fox-Tango Filter and 
Accessories Lists. Milt Lowens N4ML 
(Editor), Box 15944-S, W. Palm Beach 
FL 33416; (3Q5)-683-9587. BNB448 

FIND OUT what else you can hear on 
your general-coverage transceiver or 
receiver. Join a shortwave radio listen- 
ing club. Complete information on ma- 
jor North American clubs and sample 
newsletter $1. Association of North 
American Radio CJubs, PO Box 462, 
Norlhfield MN 55057, BNB464 

WANTED; Old Western Electric, RCA, 
Telefunken, Mcintosh, Marantz, Dyna- 
co, Tannoy, Altec— tubes, amplifiers, 
speakers. Maury Corb, 11122 Atwell, 
Houston TX 77096; (713J-728-4343, 
BNB479 

LEARN CODE on your IBM PC (or 
compatible), Commodore C-64/128, or 
Macintosh. CODE-PRO takes you from 
no knowledge to proficient copy. 
Specify computer. $10 plus $2 s&h. 
Trio Technology, Dept. 861 , PO Box 
402, Palm Bay FL 32906. BNB490 

TEN-TEC, now shipping new boxed 
U.SA made, latest 1987 factory mod- 
els, Corsair II, Century 22, Argosy It 
transceivers, Titan linear amplifier, 
2298 2KW antenna tuner, accessories 
and antennas. For the best Ten -Tec 
deal, write or phone Hwy 441 , Otto NC 
28763. BNB494 



r 



Barter 1 N* Buy advertising must pertain to ham radio products or services. 

□ Individual (noncommercial) 25c per word 

□Commercial .,...,,.... 6Qc per word 

Prepayment required. Count only the words in the text. Your address is 
free. 73 cannot verify advertising claims and cannot be held responsible 
for claims made by the advertiser. Liability will be limited to making any 
necessary corrections in the next available issue. Please print clearly or 
type (double-spaced) 



1 



No discounts or commissions are available. Copy must be received in 
Peterborough by the fifth of the second month preceding the cover date. 
Make checks payable to 73 Magazine and send to: Hope Currier, 73 
Magazine, WGE Center, Peterborough NH 03458. 



ELITE + CODE PROGRAMS. APPLE 
ll + /c/e/GS. C-64/128. 37 modes. 
Graphics, Wordprocessor, 1-100 
WPM, Variable frequency, Variable 
sound. Character and word spacing, 
Disk commands, Random/Repetitive/ 
Group Character Generators, 17 
Group choices, Fixed/Random word 
lengths (1-10 chars), Bound manual in- 
cludes Program Operation, Lesson 
Plans, Speed Increase Techniques, 
Tables, Figures, etc. $49.95. Check/ 
MO. COD's add $2. Other versions 
(S14.95-S44.95). $3,50 Demo Disk 
gives S2 off the next purchase, Write: 
LARESCO, POB 2018, 1200 Ring 
Road, Calumet City IL 60409; (31 2)- 
891-3279. BNB507 

HOME-BREW PROJECTS LIST. 

SASE WB2EUF, PO Box 708, East 
Hampton NY 11937. BNB509 

VIOEOCIPHER DESCRAMBLJNG 
MANUAL— 1 15 pp.— $27.45 ppd. Oak 
Orion— 77 pp.— $22.45 ppd. Satellite 
catalog $2. Microtronics, PO Box 2517- 
L Covina CA 91722. BNB513 

SUPERFAST MORSE CODE 3U- 
PEREASY. Subliminal cassette, $10. 
LEARN MORSE CODE fN 1 HOUR. 
Amazing new supereasy technique! 
$10. Both $17. Money back guarantee. 
Bahr, Dept. 73-3, 2549 Temple, Palm 
Bay FL 32905, BNB517 

COMMODORE CHIPS, We are an Au- 
thorized Distributor and guarantee fac- 
tory-fresh low-priced Chips. 6526/ 
6510-$9,95, 6581— $12.85, 6567— 
$14.75, PLA/82S100— S12.50. 8701 — 
$7.25, and many others. Ask about 
user group-quantity pricing. 24-hour 
delivery. , .'THE COMMODORE DI- 
AGNOSTICIAN", newly released lami- 
nated chart for diagnosing faulty ICs on 
C64/1541. A must for those who want 
to do their own repairs and save money 
and down time. Reference Aid 04 
$6.95. Reference aid #5 for C1 28 $7.95 
(plus postage). . .. Heavy Duty Power 
Supply for the C64 $27.95. . Call toll 
free (800}-64 2-7634 (outside NY) or 
(914J-356-3131 ; Kasara Microsystems, 
Inc., 33 Murray Hill Drive, Spring Valley 
NY 10977. 8NB529 

QSLs, QSLs, RUSPRINT QSLs. 

Quantities of 100, 200 t 300, or more. 
Full color Old Glory and cartoon. Also 
Parchment, Golden Eagte, and others. 
SASE appreciated, Rusprint, Rte. 1, 
Box 363-73, Spring Hill KS 66083, 
BNB532 

NI-CD BATTERIES AA/AAA $1 .50 (VW 
Tabs &1,65) each. 7-cell replacement 
pack to fit ICOM SP-3 case $14.95 
each. Cells for BP 2-S&7 $2.40 each. 
Yaesu FNB-2 "Clone" Pack $22.95 
each. PA residents add 6%. Add $2.00 
S&Htorder. Others available, write: 
CUNARD ASSOCIATES, R.D. 6, Box 
104, Bedford PA 15522. BNB557 

HAM RADIO REPAIR, all makes, all 
models. Robert Hall Electronics, PO 
Box 8363, San Francisco CA 94128; 
(408)^729-8200. BNB558 



NEW, UNIQUE LOGGING AND CON* 
TEST PROGRAMS for the Com- 
modore C-128. Fast, generalized sort 
and print. SASE for description; $24.95 
for the package. Dave Kirk KY3J, 1914 
Yardley Road, Yardfey PA 19067. 
BNB559 

||J_NJ— NJ^NJ— NJ— NJ— NJ— 
NJ— FINALLY!! A ham— SWL— CB— 
scanner store in N.J. Discount grand 
opening prices. Top performing radio 
systems for every budget. New 10-me- 
ter and VHF/UHF rigs. Antenna Spe- 
cialists, ARRL, Astatic, Azden, B&W, 
Belden, Bifal, Butternut, Clear Chan- 
nel, Daiwa, Diamond, Kenpro, Ken- 
wood, KLM, Larsen, Mirage, Nye, San- 
tec, Sanyo, THL, Yaesu, Welz, much 
more. Open M — F 10 a.m. -9 p.m., Sat. 
10 a,m.-7 p.m. Have qualified repair 
facility. Abaris Systems, 276 Oriental 
PL, Lyndhurst NJ 07071; (201)439- 
0015. BNB560 

THE DX BULLETIN provides you with 
comprehensive, up-to-date DX infor- 
mation and much more, SASE or call 
for samples. Box 4233 W, Santa Rosa 
CA 95402; (707)-S23-10Q1. BNB565 

1987 "BLOSSOMLAND BLAST*' 

Sunday, September 20, 1987. Write 
"Blast/* PO Box 175, St Joseph Ml 
49085. BNB569 

WANTED; EQUIPMENT AND RELAT- 
ED ITEMS. THE RADIO CLUB OF JU- 
NIOR HIGH SCHOOL 22 NYC, INC. , is 
a nonprofit organization, granted 
501(c)(3) status by the IRS, incorporat- 
ed under the laws of the state of New 
York w itfn t he goal of usi ng t he t heme of 
Ham Radio to further and enhance the 
education of young people. Your prop- 
erty donation would be greatly appreci- 
ated and acknowledged with a receipt 
for your tax-deductible donation. 
Please contact W62JKJ through the 
Cailbook or telephone (516)-674^072, 
24 hours, seven days a week. Thank 
you! BNB570 

CARDS. Free samples. Cards printed 
on glossy white stock Ken WA9HGE, 
1075 W. 1 1th Street, Hobart IN 46342. 
BNB574 

AZDEN PCS 5000 OWNERS: Let me 
convert your rig to cover 140,000- 
159,995, $35 complete. Money order 
or cashiers check. Ken Walker 
KA4WBR, Route 3 Box 97, Rocky 
Mount NC 27804. BNB575 

CUSTOM LEATHER RADIO CASES 

for all makes of HTsyscanners. Free 
info. Alexander, Box 1556, Kitchener 
Ontario N2G 4P2 Canada. BNB577 

THE ORIGINAL HAM SACK. Deluxe 
soft padded case for all popular hand- 
he Ids with battery packs. Three kip- 
pered compartments for radio, anten- 
na, and accessories including spare 
battery pack, Belt loops and detach- 
able shoulder slrap. Tough Dupont 
Cordura™ nylon. We are hams and we 
know you will like this case. Full refund 
guarantee. $12.50 includes shipping. 



50 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



Frank & Linda Reed KC1 DM & N1EUR, 
1SC Daniel Webster Dr M Hudson NH 
03051 . BNB580 

SB-220 OWNERS*— Enhance perfor- 
mance—add new features. 11 step-by- 
step mods which include: tuned-input 
6- and 160-meter operation, heavy-du- 
ty power supply mods, full OSK opera- 
tion, sohd-state bias control, and many 
more. Source of parts included. One 
time 50% rebate for new mods submit- 
ted and two free updates 10 pages of 
tech info on the 3-5O0Z Order today- 
Si per copy plus Si postage SASE 
for info. Bob Kozlarek WA2SOG, 69 
Memorial Prace H Elm wood Park NJ 
07407. BNB581 

AEA PK-64 Packet Controller. New 
$170 or trade for MFJ-1274. W5CE 



5124 Walden Mill Dr., Norcross GA 
30092; 404-447-9060. BNB5B2, 

ATARI PACKET PROGRAM— Con- 
nect any TNC having TTL serial pon 
directly to your Atari. No 850 interface 
needed. Works great with Kantmnics 
and MFJ. Features disk and printer ca- 
pability. Cartridge $35 Disk $15. Elec- 
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Loveland CO 80537. BNB5B3 

WANTED SCR-511/BC-745 Com- 
monly called CALVARY unit or POGO 
STICK, MILITARY Radkx Will pay Top 
Dollar and finder's fee. Contact BiU, Rt. 
#3 Box 200B, Selbyville DE 19975 
BNB584 

MORSE CODE COACH— IBM PC 32 
lessons included, create and save 
more. Random code groups also. 



Novice to Extra speeds. Practice at 16- 
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speed. Menu-driven with Help Basic- 
source included. Send $15 tor floppy. 
G, Leeoom KB6NKC. Rt 5, Box 441. 
Chippewa Falls Wl 54729 BNB585. 

SPECTRUM COMMUNICATIONS 

SCR 1000 2m repealer. Wacom Ou- 
plexer WP-639. Operational, crystals, 
manuals, schematics, clean. $1350. 
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COMMODORE REPAIRS. We are the 
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C64^$39 95. Toll Free 800-642-7634 
(outstde NY), or 914*356*3131 Kasara 
Microsystems, Inc.. 33 Murray Hill Dr, 
Spring Valley NY 10977. BNB587 



WANTED; TCS receiver and transmit- 
ter, cables, speaker, power supply, all 
or part, Ronald Percy, 1242 Pleasant 
Valfey Dr.. Catonsville MD21228: 30V 
747-0794. BNB588 

WANTED: Lafayette PrivaCom 3C, 
525, 625 T or GE 581 3B, RADIO, 2053 
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BNB589 

CHRISTIAN INVESTIGATOR NET 

Write N9FAQ Blau, 1 1 27 West Hwy 20. 
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STAMP-COLLECTING HAM wants 
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516 Melrose, Souix Falls SD 57106 
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THE RF CONNECTION 


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73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 51 




PECIAL EVENTS 



CQBQUHG150TH 
JUN22-JULS 

The Heritage ARC will use the special 
prefn VX3 from June 22 to Juty 5 to com- 
rr>emofaie Cobou/g's Sesquiceittenmal. Op- 
eration Mil rake place m a section of the 
art gallery in htstofical Victoria Hall in 
Cobourg, Ontario CW operation wilt be on 
3,550. 14050, and 21 025 SSB operation 
will bo on 3 800. 14 143. 14,200. and 21 250 
RTTY operation will be on 14.1 BO. Two- 
meter operation will be on 146 550 Special 
QSL cards have been printed, and it is 
planned id exchange greetings with Co- 
burg, Australia. Coburg W Germans; anrj 
Coburg. Oregon. 

MOFFETT FIELD CA 
JUL 3-5 

The Naval Atr Station (MAS) Moffett Fteld, 
in cooperation with the NASA Ames Re- 
search Center ARC. will be operating a 
special event station during the annual NAS 
Moffett Field Open House this year. The 
dates are July 3-5, 1967 and [he station. 
K6MF. will be on the air from 1600 UTC to 
0100 UTC all three days K6MF will operate 
on 14 260 MHz and 21 380 MHz, voice (A3) 
onty Special QSL cards are being prepared 
for the event Send an SASE to AAftC. PO 
Box 146. Mofteu Raid, CA 34035. For mom 
information, contact David Brocket 
WB6YGN— AARC President. 233 Barbara 
Or , Los Gates, CA 04035; (408^377-9345 or 
<4i5>-G9*-5536 < days } or Mike Hastings 
KB6LCJ— Even) Chairman, 2661 Barcetls 
Ave.. Santa Clara, CA 05051' 1406^-243-6745 
0f(408K7*4-S55i. 

CORNELIA 100TH 

JUL 4 

The Southern Piedmont ARC wjII oper- 
ate WD4NHW on July 4 in celebration Of 
the centennial year ol Cornelia. Georgia 
Home ot the Big Red Apple Listen lor op- 
eration in ma 20-, 40-. and 80- meter bands 
For a cedilicaie, send your OSL card and a 
9" it 12 H SASE to SPARC, PO Sox 52, Cor- 
nelia GA 305 31 



RIVERBOATDAYS 
JUL 4 

The Clinton ARC wilt operate speoal-eveni 
station W»CS on Jtity 4 to commemorate tfw 
Clinton. Iowa. Ri vertical Days Suggested 
frequencies: CW— 3 720, 7 120. 21 120. and 
28 120. phone— 3 675. 7.275, 14.275. 
21 375, and 26.400 2-meter FM— 146 460 
2-mel*r SSB— 144.210. To receive a ceflih- 
cate. please send a *10 SASE to Oarryt Pe- 
tersen KDtPY, RR #1, Box 64, Bryan! I A 
52727. 

FESTIVAL OF NATIONS 
JUL 4 

The Chatham Kent ARC will operate 
VE3CRC on Juty 4, from 1200-2200 UTC, to 
celebrate C hath am Ontario's Festival of Na- 
tions. Phone and CW on 80- 10 meters, pack- 
el and phone on 2 meters. Certificates for a 
QSL card to Cliff Russell VE3NGG, RR #1 , 
Chatham Ontario N7M 5J1 . 

HARRISBURG PA 
JUL 4 

The Harnsburg RAC wifl sponsor the 15ih 
annual Harnsburg Firecracker Hamfest on 
Juty 4 at the Brassier Fire Co picnic grounds 
near Exit t of Interstate 263. midway between 
the Pennsylvania Turnpike and Interstate B3 
FoltowPA44i N and signs to me site Tailgat- 
ing a i no charge with S3 admission XYL and 
k«ds free VE exams will be heid nearby start- 
ing at 9 am Taik-in on S2 and 16/76 For 
ad d 1 1 tonaJ details and table reservations, con- 
tact Dave KC3MG, 131 Livingston Street, 
Swatar a PA 1 71 13; (717>939-*957 

STATER BROS. CELEBRATION 
JUL4 

The Valley ARA will sponsor a special 
event station at I he Stater Brother's 'Hap- 
py Binhday u S.A. Celebration 11 m Staun- 
ton, Virginia, on July 4, from 8 am. to 8 30 
p.m on 14 250, 3 85G, and 7.230 MHz. A 
9x12 SASE Is required for a special cer- 
tificate. Mall 10 N4ICT. PO Box 1091 , Siaurv 
ton VA 24401 



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WILKES BARRE PA 
JUL 5 

The Murgas ARC wifl sponsor its 8th annu- 
al Hamfest and Computerfest on July 5. be- 
ginning at 8 a-m., at the tce^A-Rama. Coal St. 
Sports Complex, Coal Street, Wilkes- Barre, 
Pennsylvania Donation S3: XYLs and chil- 
dren under 16 free. Outdoor taitgatmg $2. 
bring your own table indoor setting 58 per 
space, includes a table, but please reserve tn 
advance, FCC exams given at 10 a m Tafk-in 
on 14661, 53.51. or t46.52. For more rnlor- 
maiion, contact K3SAE, KB3GB, RD t, Box 
214, Pirtstofl PA 18643; (717^38^*863 

NATIONAL SOARING CHAMPIONSHIPS 
JUL 5-12 

From the new Nahonal Soaring Society 
Headquarters, the State Lme ARC will oper- 
ate special-event station KT5I to celebrate (he 
1987 National Soaring Championships (open 
class) Operation wis be on ait bands from 
10-80 meters an July 5-12 For a large certifi- 
cate, send QSL and contact number lo Slate 
Line ARC KT5I PO Box U23, Hobbs NM 
B8240 

MONTEREY CA 
JUL 7-9 

The Naval Postgraduate School ARC 
(K6LY) will operate a special station aboard 



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Ihe USS Missouri (BB-63) during "Reel Week 
Monterey/ 1 in conjunction with the celebra 
lion commemorating Ihe Graal White Fleet 
journey of 1907-1909 Special even! is set for 
July 7-9. 17Q0Z-0100Z. Suggested frequen- 
cies are the lower 50 kHz of 20 and 1 5 meters 
for phone and the Novice portion of len me- 
ters A commemorative QSL card will be 
available. Send QSL and SASE to NK6H. 96 
Cuesta Vista Drive. Monterey C A 93940 

EAU CLAIRE Wl 
JUL 11 

The Eau Claire ARC wiH hold its annual 
Hamfest on Jury 11, from 6 am. to 2 p m .. at 
the 4-H buildings on Fairfa* Street (behind 
Highland Mall) in Eau Ctaire. Wisconsin Tick* 
ets $2 m advance, S3 at The door Free ta- 
bies, v*E tests given from 9am to 1 p m —all 
walk-Ins Talk -in on 147 84/ 24 For mforma- 
tion/hekets, send an SASE 10 Gene Lie berg 
KA90WH, 2840 Saturn Avenue. Eau Claire 
Wl 54703. 

PETOSKEY Ml 

JUL 11 

The Straits Area ARC will hold its Swap and 
Shop and Computer Demons iral ion on July 
11. trom 9 a.m. lo 2 p.m., ai Ihe Petoskey, 
Michigan Fairgrounds. Donation $2.50 at 
(he door, 8' lable: S3, splits allowed Talk-m 



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call (616J-347-B693 or (Gl6)-5B2-7322 

POUGHKEEPSIE NY 
JUL 11 

The ML Beacon Ham test will be held on 
July H. from 8 a. m lo 3p.tr>., at the Arlington 
Senior High School, Poughkeepgie/La- 
grange, Dutchess County, New York Ad mis- 
sion: $3. Ta] (gating space: $4 (one free ad* 
mission). Table: $6 (one free labia and 
admission} TaTk^ln on T4G 37/97 and 
146 52. For additional Information, contact 
Julius Janes W2IHY RR2. Vanessa Lane. 
Staalsburg NY 12580; (914)-&89-4933 

MAPLE RIDGE BC 
JUL 11 -12 

The Maple Ridge Hamfest wilt be held on 
July 11-l2ai St Patricks Cenier, 22589 121 
Avenue. Maple Ridge, B C, Admission: 
hams, S6. non-hams over 12, S3; under 12, 
free, two hams in family, $9. Talk-in on 
146,20/80 or 146 34/94 For more informa- 
tion, wnte to Floyd Beardsell VE7HL Box 292 + 
Maple Ridge BC V2K 7G2 

BUNSEITH ND 
JUL 11-12 

Tne 24th International Hamfest and Com- 
puierfest will be hefd on July 11-12 at the 
Intemalionai Peace Garden between Dunse>- 
th, North Dakota, and Botssevam, Manitoba 
Free space for vendors and Flea market Talk- 
m on .52. For more information, wute NT ARC , 
Bok 2002. Minor ND 58702 

INDIANAPOLIS IN 
JUL 11-12 

The TTiti annual State ARRL Conven- 
tion and Hamfest witl be hefd on July f 1 and 
12. beginning ai 6 am both days, at the 
Manon County Fairgrounds m Indianap- 
olis Indiana. Gate fee is S5 Children under 
12 free For information on inside 'tea mar- 
ket space, cah (31 7)-35G-445 1 For infor- 
mation on commercial building space, call 
(317V745-6389 

"When You Buy, Say 73" 



LAKE CANTON FIELD DAV 
JUL 11-12 

Oklahoma amateur radio operators will 
conduct therr fourth annual Field Day exercis- 
es on July 1 1-12 at Lake Canton, Oklahoma 
in the "Big Bend" plenlc shelter Activities 
begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday and continue Mil 
noon on Sunday The Lake Canton Field Day 
is neld in conjunction with the annual IARU 
"Radicsport" DX Contest Talk-in on 146,52 
or 144 85/145.45 MO travellers should use 
14&.0-1/14&G1 . The Lake Canton Field Com- 
mittee will provide a commemorative certifi- 
cate for contacts with event stations 
WD5HPU, WA5LTM, and other amateur sta- 
tions that officially operate from Lake Canton 
during Ihe event Operation will be tntheGen- 
eral phone portions of the 40- 1 0-meter bands 
and on 6- and 2-meter SSB For a certificate 
or additional information, send QSL and large 
SASE to Tim Mauldin WA5LTM, Lake Canton 
Field Day, PO Boa 19097. Oklahoma City OK 
73144; (405J-52 1-5048 

HOLM DEL NJ 

JUL 11-12 

The Holmdel ARC will operate K2DR Irom 
150OZ to220GZon Juty 1i T and from ISOQZlo 
20002 on July 12, to commemorate the 25th 
anniversary of of the launching of the TEL- 
STAR communications satellite Operation 
will be m ihe lower 25 kHz of the General 20-. 
40-. and 80-meter phone bands (check at IS 
minutes after the hour), and on 146 55 and/or 
145 64 MHz FM For certificate, send QSL 
and SASE to Holmdel ARC. PO Sox 205 , 
Holmdel NJ 07733 For more information, 
please contact Vincent Pass tone WA2ECP at 
(20l}-957-3486. 

BATTLE CREEK Ml 
JUL 11-17 

WSQF will be operated as a special-event 
station from Juty 11-17 at the Battle Creek 
International Hot Air Balloon Championship 
The station will operate on (SSB) 3 890, 
7 240, 14.250, and <CW) 7.040 and 14.040 
For a 9 x 1 2 certificate, send a large SASE lo 
SMARS. PO Box 934. Battle Creek. ML 



49016, For more information on the event, 
write lo the same address 

NORTH HILLS PA 
JUL 12 

The North Hilts ARC will hold Its 2nd annual 
Hamlesi on July 12 al Northland Library, 
Cumberland Road, North HHls, Pennsylva- 
nia. Free admission and Iree vendor space 
(bring your own table). Amateur exams will be 
given; walk-ins welcome. Talk-In on 147.69/ 
09. For more I n form at Jon , call Bob N3DOK at 
367-2393 OF Rey W3BIS at 829-9333, or in^ 
quire on Ihe 147.69/00 or 146 26/69 re- 
peaters. 

DOWNERS GROVE IL 
JUL 12 

The OuPage ARC will hold a Ham rest-Com- 
puter Show on July 12, beginning at 8 a.m., at 
Ihe American Legion Grounds, 4000 Sarato- 
ga, Downers Grove r Illinois. Tickets $3 al the 
gate. 52 in advance Handicap facilities VE 
license testing for ail classes Talk-in on 
1 46 52. For liekets or table reservations, send 
an SASE to Hamfest Chairman, DuPage 
ARC, PO Box 71, Clarendon Hills IL 60614 
For more information, call Ed at (3l2)-985- 
0527, Jim at f312h964-5529, or Everett at 
(312H95-1253 

BOWLING GREEN OH 
JUL 12 

The Wood County ARC wiH hold its 23rd 
annual Ham-A-flama on July 12 + beginning at 
8 a m , as Wood County Fairgrounds, Poe 
Road. Bowling Green. Qh,io Admission is 
tree Tab*e rental, $7, trunk sales £3 For 
reservations, contact Ross Mergenthaler 
NS8C, 2682 Joseph Road- Pembervtlle OH 
43450; f4 19M*37»S270— or call Jackie Dicken 
KA8ZRJ at (4 1 9)-352-OS56 

PETERSBURG HB 
JUL 12 

Using the caltsign, KC*DA. The Buzzard's 
Roc-si Repeater Club will have a special- 
even! station on the ajr trom downtown Pe- 
tersburg, NB lo help the community celebraie 



their centennial. This event is happening on 
12 July from 1 500 UTC to 0000 UTC on 3.950, 
7.250, T4 295 and 2&37S MHz Posslbte CW 
operation QSL with SASE to KCGDA, Larry L 
Lehma nn. 706 West Fairview Ave., Albion NB 
68620, 

MT CLEMENS Ml 
JUL 12 

Eric NFflQ and Allan KA9JJN will operate 
(SIFOQ/S from 1200Z to 2100Z to commemo- 
rate Ihe 2001 h anniversary of the Northwest 
Ordinance of 1 787 This special-event station 
will transmit on 7 250 and 14,325 as propaga- 
tion and ORM permit, Secondary frequencies 
will be 21 .350, 26,410. and Detroit area 2-me- 
ler repeaters. For certificate, send a large 
SASE to Eric Koch NFflQ, 2S05 Westminster, 
SI. Charles MO 63301 

S PIC ELAND FREEDOM DAYS 
JUL 1 7^18 

The Henry County ARC will operate spe- 
cial-event station N9WB on Juty 17-16, from 
1500-2400 UTC each day. to celebraie 

Sp*celand Freedom Days Tt Frequencies 
phone— 3.870, 7235, 14.235: CW— 3735, 
7. 135 SASE for certificate. QSL to HCARC. 
c/o Civil Defense. 11 31 Broad Street, New 
Castte IN 47362: (317>52 1-0582 

GREAT FALLS MT 
JUL 17-19 

The Great Falls Area ARC will sponsor the 
53rd annual G lacier- Waterton International 
Hamfest at Three Forks Campground on the 
southern edge of Glacier National Park on 
July 17-19. Ta&-in on 10/70 and 52 For 
further information, con lac I Shirley Smith 
KCTOA 1822 14th Avenue So . Great Falls 
MT 59405: (406>452-5958. 

OAK CREEK Wl 
JUL 18 

Tne South Mrtwaukee ARC win hold its an- 
nuaJ Swapfest on July IB, from 7 am to 3 
p.m.. at American Legion Post #434, 9327 
South Shepard Avenue. Oak Creek, Wiscon- 
sin Admission is S3 per person Tne Mdwau- 

73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 53 



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kee Volunteer Core Group will be conducting 
amateur radio exams. Talk-in on 146.94. For 
more details, including a map. write to The 
South Milwaukee ARC, PO Box 10^ South 
Milwaukee Wi 53172-0102 

CONVENTION DAYS 
JUL 18-19 

The Auburn ARA and the Seneca Co, 
ARES will operate W2CDS on July 1 8 and 1 9, 
from 1400-2200 UTC, during Convention 
Days, from the site of the first meeting place 
for women's suffrage. Suggested frequen- 
cies as time and conditions allow: phone — 
7.250, 14.250, 21.350, 2&.350; CW— 7.Q5U, 
7.125. 14.050, 21.050, 21.150, 2&.150 For a 
certificate p send QSL and large &ASE to 
W2CDS, 2485 Lower Lake Road, Seneca 
Falls MY 1314fl r 

NASHUA JA 
JULtB-19 

Great Plains ARC will operate station KC0 
CP from 1400Z July 1 B to 1 700Z July 1 9, from 
the site of the little brown church on the vale 
Frequencies will be 25 kHz above the lower 
edges of the General phone bands; FM 
146.52 and SSB 144.220. For certificate, 
send QSL and I ar ge S A S E 1 D . M uchow , Box 
203, QelweinJA50662. 

NAPERVILLEIL 
JUL 18-19 

The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society, in 
conjuction with the city of Naperville, will be 
operating a spec i al-e vent station to comm e m- 
orate the Revolutionary War. It will be operat- 
ing from 1400Z to 21 00Z on 14.300 and 7.250 
MHz ± QHM. For certificate, send QSL card 
and #10 SAS£ to: Special Events Chairman, 
Rich Wayne KE9DE, PO Box 495 h Napervrtfe 
IL 60566-0495. 

AUGUSTA NJ 

JUL 19 

The Sussex County ARC will sponsor 
SCARC '67 on July 1 9, beginning at 8 a.m. . at 
the Sussex County Fairgrounds, Plains 



Road, off Rte. 206. Registration $3. indoor 
tables $7 each. Tailgate space $5. For more 
Information, contact Don Stickle K20X, Wel- 
don Road, RD#4, Lake Hopatcong NJ 07849; 
(20D-663-O677. 

WHEELING WV 
JUL 19 

The Triple States RAC will hold its 9th an- 
nual Wheeling H a mf est/Computer Fair on 
July 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shinei 
ai Wheeling Park, in Wheeling, West Virgin- 
ia, Admission is $3 in advance, $4 at the 
door. To reserve space, contact Carl Williams 
WD8PPS h 9 East High Street, Flushing OH 
43977; (614>968-3652. For tickets, contact 
TSRAC, Box 240, RO-1, Adena OH 43901; 
(614)-546-3930. 

WASHINGTON MO 
JUL 19 

The 25th annual Zero-Beaters Hamfesl witl 
be held on July 19, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. r at 
the RernJe H. Htllerman Park (Washington, 
Missouri, Fairgrounds). Free admission. Flea 
market space, $2. Limited covered rental 
space available. FCC exams. Talk-in on S4/ 
.24 of .52. For more information, contact Ze- 
n>Beaters ARC, Box 24, Dutzow MO 63342; 
(3I4J-239-2072. 

TRAP SHOOT 
JUL 23-25 

The inland Empire ARC will operate a 
special-event station on July 23-25 from 
1700-0800 UTC to celebrate the Muscu- 
lar Dystrophy Associations^ Trap Shoot 
and Chili Cookoff at Prado Tiro Olym- 
pic Shooting Facilities in Chino, Califor- 
nia. Theme for the event will be "Shooting 
for a Miracle." Operating frequencr-es will 
be in the General-class portion of the 75-, 
40-, 20\ and 1 5- meter phone bands. The sta- 
tion will also operate in the new Novice and 
Technician portion of the 1 0-meter phone 
band. A certificate wilt be issued via WA6ZEF 
when accompanied by a QSL card and a size 
1QSASE. 



DAVENPORT I A 
JUL 24-26 

The Davenport Radio Amateur Club will 
again operate WBBXR during the Six Bieder- 
beck Memorial Jazz Festival, 1700-2200Z 
July 24 and 1500-2300Z July 25-26. Opera- 
tion wilt be on phone and CW, 80-10 meters, 
1 kHz up from the lower end of the General- 
class band edges. Certificates for your QSL 
and SASE via Davenport Radio Amateur 
Club. 2131 Myrtle, Oavenpon IA 52804 

MARQUETTE Ml 
JUL 25 

The Hiawatha ARA of Marquette County 
will sponsor the 36th annual Upper Peninsula 
Hamfest Qn July 25 at Northern Michigan 
University, For more information, write to 
Hamfest Chairman, cfo James F. Jacobson 
WD8DJA, 105 Raymbault, Marquette Ml 
49855. 

TOPSFLELD MA 
JUL 25-26 

The Heavy Hitters Hamfest will be held on 
July 25-26 at TopsfiekJ Fairgrounds, U.S. 
Rte. 1, in Topsfield, Massachusetts. Hours; 
Saturday —6 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday— 6 a,m. 
to 2 p,m. Tickets: $4 at I he gate or S3 in 
advance. Children under 12 admitted free if 
with an adult. Vendors admitted at 5 p.m, 
Friday night. Send check to Heavy Hitters 
Hamfest, PO Box 41 1, Waitham MA 02254. 
Please include an SASE. VEC license exams 
given. Talk-in on 145-04/6 64 r 147.955/ 
7.265. For more information, write to Russ 
Corkum, Jr. WA1TTV. 21 Thorndike Street, 
Arlington MA 02174. 

PORT HURON TO MACKINAC ISLAND 

YACHT RACE 

JUL 25-26 

The Eastern Michigan ARC (K8EPV) will 
commemorate the 62nd Port Huron to Macki- 
nac Island Vacht Race, July 25 and 26. The 
stat io n wi 1 1 operate from 1 400Z to 0200Z each 
day. Frequencies will be; 3. 910, 7.235. 
1 4.235 or 28. 335 on phone and 3.710, 7.1 1 
and 21 . 1 1 on CW, A certificate will be issued 



upon receipt of a large (#10) SASE, with your 
QSL. to KBEPV, 654 Georgia Marys ville. Ml 
48040, 

BEAVERTQNOR 
JUL 25-26 

The Willamette Valley DX CEub, Inc., of 
Portland, Oregon, will hosi the annuaE North- 
west DX Convention on July 25-26 at the 
Greenwood inn in 8eaverton r Oregon. Regis- 
tration information can be obtained by writing 
to the Willamette Valley DX Club, 58731 Co- 
lumbia River Highway, St. Helens OR 97051 . 

WEST FRIENDSHIP MD 
JUL 25 

The Baltimore Radio Amateur Television 
Society wilt hold the Maryland Hamfest and 
Computer Fest on July 26, beginning at 6 
am, at the Howard County Fairgrounds, Rte. 
144 and Rte. 32, adjacent to I-70 in West 
Friendship, Maryland. Admission is $4 In- 
door tables are £20 each along the wall with 
access to ac power or S1 each in the center 
of the floor, {Tables must be reserved in ad- 
vance.} Outdoor tailgating is $5 per space. 
Accessible to the handicapped. Free waJMn 
VE exams; no reservations needed. Talk-in 
on 146.16/76, 147.63/.03, or 146.52. For 
more information or table reservations, write 
to BflATS W3GXK, PO Box 5915, Baltimore 
MD 2120S 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

JUL 31 -AUG 2 

Central Oklahoma Radio Amaieur's 
(CORA's) Ham Holiday and Oklahoma State 
ARRL Convention will convene July 31 
through August 2 at Lincoln Plaza, 4445 
North Lincofn Blvd., Oklahoma City. Features 
mclud hi-tech programs and demonstrations, 
VE tests, the ARRL forum, and other events. 
The two-day flea market will be open Satur- 
day and Sunday. Talk-in on 147.63/147.03. 
Pre-regisi ration is $7.00 before July 22. Reg- 
istration is $9.00 at the door. Flea market 
tables are £2.00 with p re- regi strati on. For de- 
tails H write CORA Ham Holiday, PO Box 
850142. Yukon OK 73085-0142, 



54 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 




EVER SAY DIE 



from page 10 

Perhaps there are some ham 
psychiatrists (other than Extra 
class, of course) who could exper- 
iment with trying to repair dam- 
aged Extra brains and attempt 
to return them to certifiable san- 
ity. The usual transorbital leuk- 
otomy approach has, in most 
cases, rendered what had been a 
crazy ham into a CBer, which is 
different, but not necessarily an 
improvement. 

In the early days of amateur ra- 
dio it was just accepted by the 
medical fraternity that hams were 
that way because they'd gotten 
across the B-t and fried their 
brains. Now that 12 volts is stan- 
dard in rigs, we don't get those 
hefty jolts which fling us across 
the shack any more, so the code 
has finally been recognized as the 
real culprit. 

Now, for the good news: 
Hmmm, I'll let you know if I come 
across some, 

HAMFEST 
ENHANCING HJNTS 

The success of a hamfest or 
convention rests almost entirety 
on the support of the local am- 
ateur community. Though this 
may seem to be a statement of 
the obvious, you'd be surprised 
at how many hamfest commit- 
tees seem not yet to have figured 
this out. 

I've been attending hamfests 
for over fifty years now, so I have a 
pretty good perspective on 'em. 
For the last 18 years I've been 
bringing a 2m HT with me and 
talking over the local repeaters 
during my visit and a surprising 
number of the people I talk with 
always have the same story. Yes, 
they've heard about the ham- 
fest, but they're not planning on 
attending. 

A well-promoted hamfest will 
suck every last local ham out of 
the woodwork. It'll have them 
coming in From a couple hundred 
miles around. 

A hamfest is show business and 
should be run by hams with some 
show business background — not 
by a telephone installer for Ma 
Sell. Your hamfest committee is 
going to have to spend money to 
make money, so you need some- 
one who is comfortable with plan- 
ning and using hamfest-sized 



budgets. You need to draft a focal 
P, T. Bamum for the job, not an 
accountant. 

One of the reasons Dayton does 
so well is that they've spent years 
learning how to do it. There's a lot 
of organizing to a well-run ham- 
fest— the technical program— the 
Big Name drawing card— priz- 
es — contests and awards — ex* 
hibits— ticket sales— advertising/ 
promotion— parking — badges — 
communications — food conces- 
sions — toilets — rain plans — local 
police liaison — housing — camp- 
ing and trailers — security— and 
soon. 

The committee has to remem- 
ber that amateur radio isn't a sin- 
gle hobby— its a whole bunch — 
so the hamfest has to have some- 
thing of interest to DXers, to cer- 
tificate hunters, packeteers, 
SSTVers, RTTYers, FM/repeater- 



booths — a small lounge — with ex- 
tra help in setting up or taking 
down the booths— perhaps some- 
one to mind the booth while the 
exhibitor gets around to see the 
other exhibits. 

Advertising and promotion are 
the most critical keys to success. 
This means getting all of the free 
space possible in the local pa- 
pers — interviews and news items 
on radio and local TV, In all of the 
hamfests I've attended I can't re- 
member one which took advan- 
tage of my presence to get add- 
ed TV coverage. I'm news— did 
you see the story on page 74 
of the May issue of Success*? 
Many computer shows where Tve 
been the main speaker have 
made sure that I've been inter- 
viewed on TV as part of the pro- 
motion of their show, but I don't 
recall a hamfest committee ever 
thinking of it. 

But whether it's me, Roy Neal of 
NBC, Barry Goidwater, or Owen 
Garriott, your main speaker 
should be used to help bring in the 
local hams and, perhaps even 



id A hamfest is show business and 

should be run by hams with some 

show business background — not by a 

telephone installer for Ma Bell. " 



ers, UHFers, contesters, traffic 
handlers, and so on. Plus groups 
such as the ARRL t QCWA, 
OOTC.YLRL, andsoon. 

Prizes appeal to greed, a com- 
mon interest of most hams. But 
mostly you have to convince ev- 
eryone that they are going to 
have fun. 

Exhibitors can be attracted if 
they think you're going to have a 
good solid attendance. You want 
to make their lite as easy as pos- 
sible, so your exhibit commit- 
tee should send them brochures 
and call them. Keep your exhib- 
it prices as reasonable as you 
can. Are you going to have a 
bjg flea market which will keep 
most of the people out of the 
commercial exhibit area and send 
your exhibitors home vowing 
never to get caught at your ham- 
fest again? 

More and more hamfests are 
coddling exhibitors, recognizing 
that the larger the commercial ex- 
hibit area, the more successful 
the hamfest. They keep exhibitors 
happy with coffee and dough- 
nuts — with lunches brought to the 



more important, to attract young- 
sters who might be interested in 
amateur radio. 

I'll bet I get at least one request 
a week to come to some ham* 
fest and speak. Of course, they 
explain, they haven't any budg- 
et for a speaker, so Til have to 
pay my own way and take care 
of my hotef and car rental ex* 
penses. My calendar is busy 
enough so I keep it on a com- 
puter just to keep track. Last year 
I made over 50 flights to ham- 
fests, conventions, computer 
shows, electronic shows, semi* 
nars, and so on. In the first four 
months of this year I got to Orlan- 
do (spoke), Dayton (spoke), the 
Las Vegas Consumer Electronic 
Show (exhibited), the Internation- 
al Tape/Disc Association confer- 
ence in Hilton Head (where I 
chaired a seminar on DAT), the 
Music Business Systems confer* 
ence in Los Angeles (on a DAT 
panel), and the National Associa- 
tion of Retail Music in Miami. 
Coming up are trips to Berlin and 
Milan for audio shows, Sydney for 
a board meeting, plus the elec- 



tronic shows in Japan, Korea, Tai- 
wan, and Hong Kong— CES in 
Chicago, Hamcom in Dallas, and 
so on. In addition to that Tm trying 
to publish some magazines and 
start a few new ones. 

There goes Wayne bragging 
again, right? No, not at all. My cal- 
endar is just as full as the other 
major ham speakers, so that's 
what you're up against in trying to 
get one of us. It's easier to get to a 
hamfest (if I don't have a conflict) 
when the hamfest committee 
makes it clear I'll get some consid- 
eration. That means taking care of 
my travel expenses (and my 
wife's), a good hotel, a couple of 
dinners with your most interest- 
ing local hams— sightseeing local 
attractions. 

If you want to get the local hams 
out to the hamfest you have to 
convince them they're going to 
have a ball What kind of short 
contests can you organize? How 
about a home construction con- 
test? How about an antenna-mea- 
suring contest? How about a fox 
hunt? How about a code contest 
with certificates for 20, 25, 30, 35, 
and higher speeds? Use your 
imagination and come up with 
contests. How about a fattest-ham 
prize? Oldest? Longest licensed? 
Most outrageous mobile setup? 
Most ridiculous hat? 

The committee setting up the 
seminars all too often drops the 
ball when it comes to getting at- 
tendees to them. It takes more 
than a mention in the show guide. 
There should be posters all 
around the hamfest showing what 
events are taking place where. 
Announcements should be made 
over the public address system so 
people won't forget. The more you 
keep people running around, the 
more fun they'll remember hav- 
ing. I've had hamfests go to the 
trouble of getting me there to 
speak and then keep my talk such 
a secret than only a couple dozen 
turn up for it. 

Heck, I can't go on for a whole 
book on the subject right now— 
but one is needed. There are 
hundreds of details— like renting 
commercial HTs for your commu- 
nications since it's illegal to use 
the ham bands for a commercial 
enterprise — and don 'I give me 
that non-profit bunk— it's still 
commercial, 

Hamfests are show biz and 
don't you forget rL As the number 
of hams dwindles, we need to do 
everything we can to get those few 
of us left out for hamfests — and to 
encourage potential ham young- 
sters to join our fun. ■ 

73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 55 




K6K> PACKET 



Harold Price NK6K 
1121 Ford Avenue 
Redondo Beach CA 90278 

ON THE ROAD 

This is being written in a hotel in 
St, Paul, Minnesota, on a rented 
Compaq computer. J 'Black Sheep 
Squadron 11 is on the tube, the re- 
mains of a Domino's Pizza is in 
the trash can, and the column is, 
as you might gather, fate again. 
Since the Magnanimous Mr. 
Green's columnist stipend does 
not supply adequate funds for the 
leasing of computers, you can al- 
so correctly infer that I've got it for 
other reasons. A consultant's 
work Is never done. 

No paying job can keep the true 
Dayton Devotee away from the 
teeming crowds during the last 
week in April, however, and this 
year was no exception. Packet 
was much in evidence, as has 
been the case in the last few 
years. The local channel 22 news 
team even sent out a crew with 
'Interview someone about pack- 
et 11 on their job sheet. I was stand- 
ing in an aisle, wearing my "I'm A 
Racketeer*' button, and they 
asked if I knew anything. \ was stiJI 
talking long after they ran out 
of tape. 

Hank W0RLI got the Technical 
Achievement Award for his work 
on B8S message forwarding sys- 
tems. There were several new 
packet devices and new features 
for old devices on display at the 
vendor booths. The packet fo- 
rums were in two parts again this 
year, an intro session and an ad- 
vanced session. For the first time 
the attendance at the advanced 
session was larger than that at the 
intro session. Both had several 
hundred hams present. 

Unfortunately, packet has got^ 
ten big enough for some "en- 
trepreneurs' 1 (read sleaze artists} 
to try to cash in. I saw a $50 re- 
placement for a resistor and a ca- 
pacitor, for example. Moving on to 
thegood t here's this year's review 
of packet related items I saw at 
Dayton '87, in alphabetical order, 

AEA 

One of the cutest things I saw 
for packet devices this year has 
little to do with packet, AEA's pro- 
grammer, Steve Stuart N6IA, has 
come up with a lot of nice features 
for the AEA packet fine. This year, 



he's added FAX receive capabili- 
ties to the PK-232. Using the 
RTTY decoder, giving two shades 
of gray (black and white), the PK- 
232 outputs FAX pictures to an 
Epson-compatible printer. Even in 
the noisy rf and computer-hash 
environment of Dayton, the FAX 
software sent near-perfect weath- 
er charts and other FAX data to 
the printer as they were picked off 
the air from a general-coverage 
receiver. Tve always been inter- 
ested in this sort of thing, so Vm 
hoping AEA takes it the next step 
and makes it easy to get the image 
into a computer for manipulation. 
The addition of FAX makes the 
AEA multimode TNC more multi- 
mode that anyone else's. This wifl 
do nothing to counter the only ma- 
jor complaint I've heard about the 
PK-232, which is that the manual 
is too big. 

The other major announcement 
for AEA at Dayton this year was a 
high-speed rf modem (RFM-220). 
This was one of two commercial 
high-speed announcements (see 
also the section on GLB) this year. 
Th is is a true rf modem, a data port 
on one end, and a 220-MHz rf port 
on the other, The modem uses 
one-bit-per^baud "straight 11 FSK. 
The technical guys say the unit 
will transmit at data rates from to 
19,200 baud, aithough the initial 
marketing blurbs mistakenly set 
the limit at 9600, The RMF-220 
uses an ovenized synthesizer and 
covers all of the 220-MHz band in 
5-kHz steps. An oven is a device 
that keeps a circuit at a constant 
temperature, reducing tempera- 
ture-caused frequency changes, 
The frequency is controllable from 
the front panel and also through 
an RS-232 port. All of the standard 
rf magic words are invoked by this 
unit, including GaAsFET front end 
and "multiple helical resonators." 
TX/RX switch time is less than 10 
ms. power output is an adjustable 
0-30 Watts. 

Although two RFM-220 proto- 
types were on display, these units 
weren't quite ready for on-air de- 
mos. Availability is "mid-sum- 
mer/' The cost is in the $600 
range. 

GLB 

GLB's big announcement this 
year was also an rf modem, the 
NETLINK 220. Two NETLINK ra- 
dios were on the air and running 



F* 

R <n> 

W 



K <n> 



List latest 10 message headers with message 
number. 

List all the message headers. 
Read a message numbered < n > 
Send a message. You will be asked receiver and 
subject. Send <CR> . <CR> or <CR> 
controi-2 <CR> to end the message. 
Kill a message numbered <n>, A message be- 
ing read by other station(s) cannot be killed. FO- 
12 BBS is a multi-user system. Only the originator 
of the message can kill messages. 



H 



Your TNC should be set as follows: 



Protocol 



T1 timer 



Max Frames 



It must be AX.25 version 2. WA8DED PROMs are 
needed for TNC- "L 
Command TMC-1 : V2 

TNC-2:Ax25l2v2 0N 
6 seconds or longer 
Command TNC-1 :F6 

TIMC-2 : FRack 6 
2 or 3 is suggested 
Command TNC-1 : 02 or 03 

TNC-2 : MAX 2 or MAX 3 



Table 1. JO-1 2 BBS commands. 



19.2k-baud demos to a constant 
crowd of interested packeteers. 
The GLB unit also uses straight 
FSK modulation, and engineers 
from both GLB and AEA say their 
units wiU be able to receive pack- 
ets from each other. The GLB 
spec sheet says the bandwidth is 
30 kHz. The NETLINK 220 has a 
crystal controlled oscillator with 
an oven, and has a digital afc The 
digital afc (automatic frequency 
control) tunes the receiver fre- 
quency based on the received sig- 
nal. Two afc circuits are used: one 
quickly corrects for short-term 
drift; the other handles long-term 
drifts. The GLB spec sheet gives 
a TX/RX turnaround time of 3 
ms. They also stress bulletproof rf 
design in a 3-page fact sheet. 
Price is $649, available in July or 
August. 

HAL 

HAL announced the RPC-2000, 
an IBM PC piug-in card, i didn't 
get very much information on this 
one, but it has two packet ports 
and comes with menu-driven 
"user friendly" software, Contact 
HAL for information on availability 
and price, 

Kantronics 

Kantronics seemed to betaking 
a wait-and-see attitude this year, a 
stance no doubt brought on in part 
by the failure of their 2400-baud 
modem to set a standard or see 
major use. Their "Kantronics 
News'' notes the appearance of 
level-three networks and high- 



speed modems. In both cases, the 
newsletter says that Kantronics 
will participate in the evolution 
with products to be announced 
later. The newsletter also reports 
a fix for the KAM which kept it from 
functioning as the TNC on an RLI- 
style BBS {they work fine for a 
BBS user). If you are a BBS sysop 
with a 2,0 version of the KAM soft- 
ware, contact Kantronics for an 
update. 

Kantronics has addressed a 
long outstanding problem with 
their product line by incorporating 
a watchdog timer as an integral 
part of their recent products, the 
KAM and the KPC-4, This Is a 
hardware device that keeps a mal- 
functioning TNC from locking the 
PTT line and leaving your station 
on the aw for tong periods of time. 
As mentioned in previous col- 
umns, if your TNC hasn't got one, 
add one before using it in un- 
attended operation. 

Pavillion Software 

You had to look hard to find this 
next one. \ stumbled into it at the 
Contested Forum. I was lured in 
by a paper written by AK1A with 
title that mentioned packet as a 
contest aid, A program called 
PacketCluster is being used to 
simultaneously connect a large 
number of users together for the 
purpose of exchanging multiplier- 
and DX-spottlng announcements. 
This program runs on a Kantron- 
ics KPC-2, which altows up to 26 
users to be connected to a single 
node (TNC). PacketCluster sup- 



56 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



ports 25 concurrent users, with 
the 26th connection used to con- 
nect to another node of 25 users. 
Many nodes may be connected in 
thfs way. Spotting reports submit- 
ted by a user are sent to alt other 
users on alt nodes. 

It seems to me that this could 
also be used by some types of 
emergency nets, where a small 
amount of data needs to go to a 
large number of stations with a 
high degree of simultaneity. The 
cost of thrs package is $59.95. Al- 
though I haven't used it and there- 
fore can't recommend it, the idea 
is very intriguing and worth further 
scrutiny. I'd like to print a review 
by one of its users. The address 
for Paviilion software is PO Box 
803, Amherst NH 03031 , 

Applications 

Vm still looking for good packet 
applications to write about. The 
Paviilion software PacketCluster 
mentioned above is one example. 
Here's another, as described by J + 
Franklin Fields. Jr. KB0QJ, the 
president of the OPRA, the Okla- 
homa Packet Radio Association. 
Inc. OPRA is in the process of in* 
stalling a statewide packet digi- 
peater network to function in the 
event of civil emergencies, espe- 
cially weather-related ones (as 
WX seems to be a prime culprit in 
tornado alley). Much of the funds 
and equipment will come from 
corporate donors. OPRA has 
placed an AT&T 3B2 2MB UNIX V 
based computer al the National 
Weather Service Forecast Office 
(NWSFO). This computer will 
provide menu-driven access to 
selected NWSFO information de- 
livered from the NWSFO mam- 
frame in near real-time. The 
program, written in C. is still in 
the development process, The 
nodes will be equipped with the 
WA8DED/W6IXU NET/ROM pro- 



tocol to expedite dissemination. 
An option for the manual targeting 
of critical information to specific 
OK County Emergency Operating 
Centers (EOC) for immediate ac- 
tion will be included. 

The total number of pfanned 
nodes is 22, However, the nodes 
now operational are limited to two 
areas: 5 nodes in eastern OK and 
8 nodes in central OK, The two 
areas are not now linked, but the 
central nodes are performing be- 
yond expectations. The incorpo- 
ration of the NETfROM protocol 
would greatly enhance through- 
put even now. This partial system 
is attracting much attention in 
Washington DC at NOAA and 
NWS, and In California at the 
NWSFO Office of the Regional Di- 
rector, For more information, con- 
tact KB0QJ m N5JTZ 



Space News 

Martin G3YJO, Jeff G0/K8KA, 
and Mac G8VLY spent three 
weeks in Pakistan in April setting 
up two experimental UoSAT 
ground stations — one at the Pun- 
jab University (Lahore) and the 
second at the Space and Upper 
Atmosphere Research Commis- 
sion (Karachi). The stations will 
provide facilities for students to 
undertake projects associated 
with the two UoSAT spacecraft 
and will be active on the UO-11 
Digital Communications Experi- 
ment using the amateur callsigns 
AP2PUL and AP2SUP. Several 
messages were passed between 
these two stations and stations in 
the U.S. 

The JO-12 mailbox may have 
seen its first use by the general 
amateur community by the time 
you read this. The following in- 
formation is from a status report 
from M. Fukasawa JR1FIG and 
Tak Okamoto JA2PKI which was 
received on May 6, Background 



information on JO-12 can be 
found in the August, 1986, issue 
of 73. 

JAMSAT announces the com- 
mencement of new operation 
mode of FO-1 2. On May 4th, new 
operation software was released, 
The new mode allows "On De- 
mand*' operation of Mode JD. In 
this mode, the bird is usually 
listening, not transmitting. It 
starts transmitting the mode JD 
PSK signal at 435.910 MHz im- 
mediately after receiving any 
valid AX25 frame, including a Ul 
(unproto) frame, through one of 
four uplink channels, 145,85/87/ 
,89/.91 MHz. Transmission con- 
tinues as long as a frame is re- 
ceived once in a three-minute 
interval. The bird goes back to the 
listening mode when it does not 
hear an AX.25 frame for more 
than 3 minutes. 

This "On Demand" operation 
happens whrle the bird is in the 
"ON" period, which occurs every 
other 2 hours. While JO-12 is in 
the "ON" period, you will hear 
5-second short PSK burst ev- 
ery minute, so that you will know 
that the mode JD is available 
and can be switched on by send- 
ing some packets to the bird. 
You will hear nothing while it 
is in the 2-hour +, OFF T " period. 
This new operation mode will be- 
come the base of future FO-1 2 
BBS service. A weekly schedule 
will be determined after enough 
power usage data for this new 
mode has been acquired and 
analyzed. 

FO 12 BBS 

Program Development 

The BBS software is running on 
theJAS-1 engineering model and 
is being tested by the JAMSAT 
software team. The first version of 
BBS program which has limited 
number of commands will be load- 



ed and tested on FO-1 2 very soon. 
Please Keep in mind that this 
does not mean that the BBS is 
now available for public usage. 
While the software team is testing 
its functions, your attempt to con- 
nect to FO-1 2 (8J1JAS) might fail 
and you will receive BUSY from it. 
The first version of the program 
will have the commands shown in 
Table 1 . 

JAMSAT Notes 

The catlsign of FO- 12 which you 
use to connect is 8J1JAS. The 
number of messages is limited to 
50, If more than 50 messages are 
posted, older ones wilt be over- 
written. Maximum memory avail- 
able as message storage is 192K. 

There will be no command to 
logout. Simply disconnect by 
using the TNC*s disconnect 
command* 

Personal mail will not be sup- 
ported by the first version, Your 
messages can be read by anyone 
and you can read messages ad- 
dressed to someone else. 

While BBS is in operation, the 
digital repeater is disabled. 
Digipeat request packets will not 
be accepted by FO-1 2. 

An increased number of users 
will slow its response and require 
a longer T1 (frack) lime. The maxi- 
mum acceptable length of the 
data portion of a packet (PA- 
CLEN) is 199. It should be set 
shorter. 

FO-1 2 transmits at PACLEN = 
128 and MAXFRAMES-1. This 
information is preliminary and 
may be changed without notice. 

I'm out of room for another 
month. Til have to defer until next 
month a description of the 56k- 
baud modem prototype demon- 
strated by a group of Georgia 
hams at Dayton. II looks tike 
things are finally on the move, 
modem-wise. ■ 



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73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 57 




BOVE AND BEYOND 



Peter H. Putman KT2B 
3353 Fieidstone Drive 
Doyfestown PA 18901 

NEW DIGS 

As I write this month's column, 
we're recovering from the effects 
of having moved from one state to 
another over a 60-mile path. All of 
the things that usually get lost did; 
most of the things that can get 
damaged did not (fortunately), I 
should have suspected that a 
move was inevitable after spend- 
ing so much time and effort to re- 
model my "shack" at my old QTH! 

The new location offers more 
possibilities for VHF and UHF op- 
eration, as I now have an acre of 
land to deal with (as opposed to a 
city lot of roughly 50 x 150 feet). 
The township f live in has a very 
loose antenna and tower ordi- 
nance: Essentially, it states that 
(A) No antenna, dish, or tower can 
be situated in the front yard; (B) 
The tower must be set back t-1/2 
times its height from the property 
line; (C) It must comply with any 
FAA regulations where applica- 
ble; (D) No height restrictions in 
the general building ordinance 
shall apply to towers, antennas, or 
satellite dishes. 

Not loo hard to cope with! IVe 
elected to install a Tri-Ex W51 
crank-up as opposed to a fixed 
tower. The height fully extended is 
51 feet; collapsed, it's about 20 
feet. The cranking feature makes 
servicing antennas a whole lot 
simpler and adds a safety margin 
in high winds, a fact not tost on me 
after the Labor Day hurricane in 
1985 did a major realignment of 
my old 40-foot tower and 15-foot 
mast. What's that, you say? Can't 
use hardline with crank-up tow- 
ers? You're absolutely right. All of 
the runs on my new tower will be 
Belden 9913. I am so impressed 
with this cable that l*m doing the 
entire antenna array up with it, on 
50 MHz, 144 MHz, 220 MHz, 432 
MHz, and 1 296 MHz as well (using 
a tower-mounted preamp with the 
latter to overcome the nearly 6 dB 
of loss on receive). 

After auditing my time spent on 
VHF/UHF, I concluded that I did 
most of my contest operation por- 
table and the requirements for op- 
eration from the new location 
were quite modest* so 111 be run- 
ning about 100-200 Watts per 
band to single yagis on 6 t 2 and 



220, as well as a pair of yagis on 
432 and an H-frame of yagis on 
1296, Transverters will be the sig- 
nal source on each band, driven 
from an ICOM IC-740 and a Ken- 
wood TS-430S. Power amplifiers 
will be solid-state types from Mi- 
rage and Microwave Modules, 
with the exception of my trusty 
3CX100 on 23 cm (they're cheap 
and hard to beat). 

As things come along, I'll show 
a few photos of the new installa- 
tion so you can get some ideas for 
your new setups (whatever they 
might entail). Incidentally, t elect- 
ed to put all of the operating equip- 
ment in a new computer desk/ 
hutch arrangement made from 
solid oak, which cost me all of 
$450 in unfinished form. It holds 
everything perfectly with the ex- 
ception of the 23 cm amp, which 



yagi imaginable, including new 
18-element versions for 902 MHz, 
which I understand went very 
quickly. SSB Electronics of Ger- 
many was represented as well, 
showing the old standard LT23S 
for 1296 (still the best thing on the 
market for 23 cm to date) as well 
as the newer LT33S for 33 cm, 
which I'll also be reviewing in 
coming months. Kenwood has in- 
troduced a new duoband radio for 
2 meters and 70 cm (TW-4100A), 
and these units seem to be all the 
rage in urban areas. Kenwood al- 
so has the counterpart to the IC- 
575 in the TS-670 for 40, 15, 10 
and 6 meters, and offers a nice 
portable for 23 cm FM with the 
TR-50. (I was told by Kenwood 
that when the TR-50s hit the mar- 
ket in California, they couldn't 
keep them in stock — the orders 
were that good,) 

Everett Gracey of RF Concepts 
was there with his new line of am- 
plifiers and I must say I'm im- 
pressed with the level of work- 
manship. Although most of the 



"The 73 Magazine/ICOM Golden 

Gigahertz Contest sounds intriguing 

and might be a good way to get a 

feei for23-cm operation/' 



never really fit anywhere neatly in 
my old shack either. The nice 
thing about the hutch is the open 
space behind the shelves for mak- 
ing interconnects. This ensures a 
neat wiring job but makes tearing 
the station apart for a portable 
contest much easier. 

Dayton Dept. 

Due to the fact that I closed on 
my house at 3:30 p,m, the Friday 
afternoon of Dayton, it should 
seem understandable that I could 
only spend one day there (Satur- 
day) before dashing home to be- 
gin unpacking. But I did get a 
chance to make a few circuits 
around the Harnvention and saw 
many interesting products, to wit: 
The ICOM IC-575, a dual-band 
10m/6m base station in the style 
of the IC-275 (which I was so fond 
of a few months back). The IC-375 
for 220 was also on display, and 
I've made arrangements to get 
review units in coming months. 
Of course, Micro 2ATs were sell- 
ing like ricecakes. Where's the 
Micro 3 AT? 

Tonna Antennas of France was 
there in force with every type of 



models on display were for 2 me- 
ters, I've been told that 220 base 
and hand-held units are on the 
way, I will try to get a review of 
them for you shortly. Everett also 
showed me a blueprint for a whiz- 
bang repeater controller they will 
have on the market shortly (look 
out, ACC). Microwave Modules in- 
troduced a new 80-Watt amplifier 
for 220 MHz based on the popular 
100HS design for 2 meters. 220 
transverters were selling briskly 
as well. 

At the Yaesu booth I was abie to 
find out that yes, indeed, there is a 
FT-790R MKII in the works for 70 
cm, pending type-acceptance by 
the FCC. Will we see a FT-390R 
MKII for 220? Sounds like it's a 
real possibility. 

Advanced Receiver Research 
was on the scene with their line of 
high-performance preamplifiers 
and receive converters. I might 
add that a receive-only converter 
is a cheap way to check out a band 
before you jump in with both feet, 
and they are available for 50, 144, 
220 T and 432 MHz. When will ARR 
make a preamp for 23 cm? Onfy 
time will tell. 



There were plenty of other ex- 
hibits that I could only pause mo* 
mentarily at such as Encornm, Mi- 
rage/KLM> Cush craft, TenTec, 
and others, The overwhelming 
conclusion 1 came to is that there 
has been an explosion of new 
equipment and antennas for VHF 
and UHF operation in the past 
year, especially in the hand-held 
radio department. Hand-helds 
are now available for f44, 220, 
440, and 1260 MHz; portable 
equipment is available for 50 
MHz. A bewildering array of ac- 
cessories confronts the hand-held 
user, with outboard power am- 
plifiers, ''docking*' units, and an- 
tennas from every manufacturer 
possible. 

73 and I are trying in our limited 
way to review as much of this ma- 
terial as we can. In coming issues 
you'll see the ICOM 1O03AT and 
1C-12AT, the Yaesu FT-109 T FT- 
727, and FT-690R MKtt, and the 
RFC 220 base/mobile and HT am- 
plifiers. No doubt about it-it's truly 
a buyer's market. Shop around. 
Ask your friends who own some of 
these radios. Read the reviews, 
and you'li do quite nicely. And if 
you haven't made it to Dayton 
yet— what are you waiting for? 

Contest Update 

Bart Jahnke KB9NM writes in to 
tell of a scheduled portable opera- 
tion for the OQ VHF WPX in July. 
Nothing unusual about that; lots of 
folks will be portable. What sets 
this operation apart is that he 
and 5 other operators from the 
well-known W1XX contest crew 
will be giving out contest points as 
4U1UN from the United Nations 
Building in New York City. Not on- 
ly that, they'll be on all bands— 50 
through 2304 MHz— to boot! Ever 
work a new country on 1 3 cm? 23 
cm? Here's a good chance, espe- 
cially if propagation is favorable. 
This operation takes place from 
the 18th to the 20th. Bart advises 
that all QSL requests should be 
handled through: HA Bohning 
W2MZV, 1 45 Troy Meadow Road, 
Parsippany NJ 07054. 

If you missed the Spring Sprints 
and the ARRL June VHF QSO 
Party, there's still time to get on 
and have some fun. The 73 Mag- 
azine/ICOM Golden Gigahertz 
Contest sounds intriguing and 
might be a good way to get a feel 
for 23-cm operation. Of course, 
the CO VHF WPX offers some- 
thing for everyone on VHF, And 
right behind is the ARRL August 
UHF QSO Party on 220 MHz and 
up. Try something different— take 
your station out in the car, or mo- 



58 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



the ultimate information code 



Equipment required: 

Transmission medium: 
Data rate: 
Auto- Sync: 

Code: 

Output level: 
Power Supply: 
Mounting: 
Environment: 




One pair, vocal chords 

Air 

200 WPM optimum 

Instant auto speed lock to over 

300 WPM 

Any language 

to >100 db 

Draws power from main life support system 

Completely portable & self-contained 

Ideal, Class M planet, 72 °F (Sunny, mild ocean breeze etc) 

Adaptable from below 0°F to over 100 °F 



IN SHORT, you 



were born with the equipment you 
need to communicate with human 
speech. You don't need CRTs, Key- 
boards, Terminals or digital codes. 
You just talk I When you want to 
leave a message for someone on a 
fancy electronic mailbox, wouldn*t 
vou reallv rather use voice? Who 
needs all the mysterious miscellane- 
ous digital stuff just to tell your 
buddy Fred that "You'll be over 
Saturday morning for the antenna 
party"? Why bother with any thing 
but normal speech? That's the con- 
clusion we at Micrologcame to. So, 
we got busy and designed just that, 




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card for your local 
repeater or remote base 
that stores actual voice mess- 
ages for instant recall with a 
touch-tone mike. Operation couldn't 
be simpler. Punch up the repeater, 
hit a couple keys on your pad and 
talk, Later, your friend will key- 
up, enter the access code and hear 
YOUR VOICE speak the message 
you left hours or days before. Isn't 
that what you wanted in the first 
place? An easy to use "Bulletin 
Board' without the hassle of packet 
or RTTY! Sure, packet has its place 
for lengthy programs, but you just 

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Mailbox operational requirements. 
Fifty minutes of high quality 
speech recording per 10 mBvte in 
your PC/XT or clone. Put the AIR- 
MAIL system to work for your 
group. AIR-MAIL voice board, 
$895.00 from Microlog Corp,, 
20270 Goldenrod Lane, German- 
town, Maryland 20874. Telephone 
(301) 428-3227. 



bile home, or boat, or up a moun- 
tain or talE building, or wherever— 
there's a way to get a signal on 
from these places. Td like to see 
photos of some unusual VHF op- 
eration from readers— something 
out of the ordinary, How about it? 

Odds and Ends 

Some folks have asked whether 
there is a way to prevent severe 
front-end overload when using a 
preamplifier ahead of a multi- 
mode radk> (or even an FM-onty 
transceiver, for thai matter). Yes 
there is. provided you can access 
the receive line separate from the 
transmit line. The surplus market 
abounds with 50-Ohm fixed atten- 
uators at bargain prices. I had a 
problem where using a GaAsFET 
ahead of a transverter resulted 
In too much signal level to the 
first rf stage— an MRF901 bipolar 
device — so the solution was to 



employ a 10-dB fixed attenuator 
aftef the prearnp and before the 
transverter. 

The prearnp was rated at almost 
20 dB of gain, so cutting it back to 
10 dB resulted in a modest im- 
provement in station sensitivity 
but retained good front-end per- 
formance. The GaAsFET liked 
driving a steady 50-Ohm load as 
well! The fix cost all of $3 at a flea 
market. Such attentuators are not 
rated to carry much power— typi- 
cally in the milliwatt region. But 
they are relatively flat as far as swr 
goes, in many cases being ac- 
ceptable up through 23 cm. They 
have other uses around the shack 
for measurements and alignment. 
Do yourself a favor and pick up a 
couple al the next flea market. 
Mine are made by Micro lab and 
are rated at 100 mW maximum 
dissipation. 

Here's another odd and end: If 



you have a 50-MHz radio and 
would like to get on 220 MHz, you 
can do it with the Microwave Mod- 
ules MMT220-28, a new crystal, 
some #32 enameled wire, and a 
few minutes of your time. Simply 
replace the existing 96-MHz crys- 
tal with one cut for 85.000 MHz 
(Series resonant, HC/18-U holder, 
overtone type). Next, rewind the 
receive mixer coil to be T 2 turns 
with a 24urn link in the center. The 
2-tum link goes to the 50-MHz re- 
ceive output, while the 12-turn link 
goes to the 40622 mixer. Finally, 
rewind the transmit mixer coil to 
12 turns with a 2-turn center jink, 
Either side of the transmit link 
goes to the 40822 transmit mix- 
ers, while the 2-turn link goes to 
the 50-MHz transmit connection. 
It's a simple matter to trim the 
oscillator in at the 170-MHz dou- 
bter frequency (220 - 170 = 50) 
and repeak the TX and RX coils. If 



you want, you can install a 27- 
Ohm, 2-Watt resistor in series with 
the transmit input and a 33-Ohm, 
2-Watt resistor from input to 
ground, allowing direct drive with 
up to about 4 Watts. This modifi- 
cation has been used successful- 
ly with the ICOM IC-502 and I have 
tried it with a Yaesu FT-690R MKII 
with great results. 

Pat Bunn N4LTA writes in to tell 
of a new 50-MHz beacon he's in- 
stalled on 50.070 MHz- Output 
power varies from 100 fflW to 10 
W in three steps, changing every 
15 seconds with a 3-second CW 
note for logging purposes. The an- 
tenna is a half-wave halo at 30 
feet. Pat advises that he'll send a 
special W4LTA/BCN QSL card to 
all those who sending reports (Pat 
Bunn N4LTA t 171 Spring Lake 
Drive, Spartanburg SC 29302). 
See you next month. Above and 
Beyond. ■ 



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r» 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 61 



Uamsats 






Andy MacAlfister WA5ZIB 
23 1 Romayor Court 
Peariand TX 77581 

STATUS REPORTS 

Until mid-May, when AMSAT- 
OSCAR 10 was returned to active 
service, satellite activity was slow. 
The unpredictable scheduling of 
RS5, RS7, and Fuji-OSCAR 12 
did not help anyone in maintaining 
enthusiasm for the amateur satel- 
lite program. This month I will re- 
port on the status of our hamsats 
and follow up with a station review 
and a fish story. 

Radio Satellites 

Battery problems continue to 
plague RS5 and RS7. In spite of 
this, activity has been very good 
on both satellites. New stations in 
the Yukon and Alaska have been 
on in recent months since the last 
eclipse period ended in March. 
The RS5 transponder is excellent. 
The batteries, however, are com- 
pletely dead, so it will only operate 
when the solar panels are illumi- 
nated. 

RS7, on the other hand, has not 
only been performing well, but 
also seems to have some life 
left in its batteries. The auto- 
transponder has even been acti- 
vated for some orbits. The auto- 
transponder, or ROBOT, is a 
computer capable of receiving 
and logging callsigns it hears on 
145.836 MHz. When a calfsign is 
transmitted to the satellite in a 
specific sequence, the ROBOT 
will acknowledge the callsign and 
assign it a GSO number during 
its response to the calling sta- 
tion, Later, when the proper 
commands are received from a 
ground-control station, the RO- 
BOT will dump its list of serial- 
numbered callsigns. To get a QSL 
card, you must send for one. The 
address is: Central Radio Ctub, 
PO Box 88, Moscow, USSR. 

To contact the ROBOT, first 
listen for the RS7 telemetry bea- 
con on 29,501 MHz, If the bea- 
con is active, try around 29.341 
MHz for a few minutes. If the 
ROBOT is in operation, you will 
hear it call CQ in CW at about 
18 words per minute. When it's 
finished, transmit a carrier on 
145.835 MHz. If you do not hear a 
signal coming back on the ten-me- 
ter frequency, try tuning the trans- 
mit frequency to counter Doppier 



shift until a steady tone (the 
ROBOT'S carrier) can be heard. 
When all is ready, call the ROBOT 
using the following sequence, 
with your own call inserted appro- 
priately: RS7 DE WA5ZIB AR. The 
"AR" at the end must be a contin- 
uous dit-dah-dit-dah-dit, (no 
space between letters) otherwise 
the satellite will completely ignore 
the transmission, I have found 
that RS7 prefers uplinked CW at 
20 words per minute, but will ac- 
cept anything from 15 to 35, if it is 
sent well. A computer or pro- 
grammable keyer will work every 
time; a straight key may not work 
at all unless you have a perfect 
"fist." A typical response from the 
satellite might look like this: 
WA5ZIB DE RS7 QSO NR 123 
QSO NR 123 OP ROBOT TU FR 
QSO 73 SK. 

Take care not to hog the RO- 
BOT. Other stations may also be 
on frequency attempting a con- 
tact. Usually when several sta- 
tions are present, it Is a good prac- 
tice to take turns attempting a 
contact. The ROBOT can be ac- 
tive alone or simultaneously with 
the satellite transponder. After a 
few contacts in the passband, 
next time listen for the ROBOT 
before the satellite disappears 
over She horizon. 

The news about RS9 and R310 
has been quite confusing. At 
the time this column was written 
(early May) neither satellite had 
been launched. Some reports 
have even referred to RS1 1 as a 
harnsat soon to be launched. If 
only one satellite is to go up in 
the near future, it will likely be 
RS10 due to its advanced ca- 
pabilities over RS9, Look to the 
April HAMSATS column for fre- 
quency details, and don't be sur- 
prised if the next RS calls itself 
RS9 even though its band plan 
looks like RS10. 

UoSATs 

The University of Surrey In En- 
gland has been expanding its 
network of DCE (Digital Commu- 
nication Experiment) ground sta- 
tions for packet radio operation 
through UoSAT-OSCAR 1 1 . The 
purpose is to demonstrate the 
usefulness of store-and-forward 
communications via iow-earth-or- 
bit satellites. A single ground sta- 
tion couid be linked with a terres- 
trial packet network to allow 




Photo A The simple but effective WA5RON satellite station. 



message-forwarding to other re- 
mote areas not linked via the 
shortwave bands. 

The DCE is not configured for 
casual use by any would-be oper- 
ator, but the benefits will be felt by 
those with access to packet net- 
works with connections to a UO- 
11 ground station. DCE activity 
can be monitored on 145.825 
MHz, the two-meter telemetry 
downlink frequency, when a 
ground station is receiving mes- 
sages. Although 4300 baud is in 
use for some 435-MHz operation, 
1200 baud will be heard on the 
two-meter frequency. 

AMSAT-OSCAR10 

After a two-month silence, AO- 
10 has been released for guard- 
ed operation. On May 1st, space- 
craft command stations around 
the world concluded that the 
batteries needed a few more 
weeks to recover from the period 
of low iNumination of the solar 
panels. The IHU (Internal House- 
keeping Unit) was successfully re* 
set even though the on-board 
memory has been heavily dam* 
aged by radiation. 

As long as the batteries can 
continue to survive the deep dis- 
charge periods caused by uncon- 
trollable satellite attitude, AO-T0 
will likely continue as a viable 
hamsat beyond the projected 
launch date of early 1988 for 
Phase 3C. In the meantime, we 
will be required to pay strict atten- 
tion to operating schedules and 
uplink power restrictions, This will 
greatly prolong the life of our 
most ambitious amateur satellite 
to date. 

Looking back on the attitude 
predictions presented in April, 
late June {Field Day!) and early 
July show a period of 100 percent 
solar-panel illumination. If all goes 
well, activity on AO-10 should be 



fantastic till the end of August, 
when we'll have to endure another 
hibernation period. Keep your 
power down and listen to the AM- 
SAT nets for updates. 

Fuji-OSCAR 12 

The experiments continue on 
FO-12, It has been impossible to 
guess the satellite's schedule of 
operation. There were a lot of 
recharge days during April on 
mode JA T the analog transpon- 
der, In May, using a new form of 
JD (digital) activity, testing began 
on BBS (bulletin board system) 
software. 

Previously, JD operation in- 
cluded a five-minute on/off cycle 
embedded in a two-hour on/off 
cycle embedded in a one-day 
on/off cycle. The latest change 
includes "on demand 7 ' operation 
of JD. The two-hour and one-day 
cycles have been retained, but 
the satellite only listens when 
it's on. It transmits on 435.910 
MHz when it receives an accept- 
able AX. 25 packet transmission 
on one of the four uplink chan- 
nels: 145.85, 145.87, 145.89, or 
145.91 MHz. While in the listen- 
ing mode, a short 2-3-second 
burst will be sent every minute 
just to fet you know that the sat- 
ellite is active but hasn't re- 
ceived any packets. This will alle- 
viate the inconvenience of the 
five-minute on/off cycle while still 
retaining an adequate charge 
level in the batteries, since there 
are no suitably equipped JD 
ground stations in many parts of 
the world. Heavy use will only 
occur over heavily populated ar- 
eas. When no packets have been 
received for three minutes, the 
system will revert to the listen- 
ing mode. 

Development work on the soft- 
ware was conducted using the 
JAS-1 engineering model and per- 



62 73 Amateur Radio * J uly r 1 987 



formed by the JAMSAT software 
team, The first version of the BBS 
had very few commands since the 
preliminary tests were to analyze 
on-board power usage during 
BBS activity. Enhancements will 
be added later. 

Some TNC-2 parameters 
should be changed before you 
try to access the satellite. Set 
FULLDUP ON, FR 6, MAX 3 and 
PACLEN 128. To connect to the 
satellite, type ,R C 8J1JAS M fol- 
lowed by a carriage return. To get 
a list of available commands type 
"H" 1 for help. The engineers are 
still experimenting, but these BBS 
commands might work: "R M to 
read a message, *F tf to list the 
last ten message headers, ' W to 
write or send a message and * 4 K" 
to kill a message. Obviously, 
knowledge of Japanese will not be 
a prerequisite for BBS work. 

No personal mail is supported 
by the first versions of the BBS 
software. Your messages can be 
read by anyone and you can read 
messages addressed to someone 
else. As more users access the 
BBS, system response time will 
slow. To log out simply perform a 
normal disconnect. Many chang- 
es and system upgrades are ex- 
pected before Ft>1 2 is allowed to 
follow any long-term predictable 
schedule. 

Ground Station Profile 

For those of you that have not 
yet attempted any amateur satel- 
lite activity, you may be surprised 
to discover that your station is ca- 
pable of hamsat communication 
or at least has most of the neces- 
sary ingredients already at hand. 

I have had several RS contacts 
with Ron WA5RON over the last 
several years. His station does not 
include any high-cost equipment, 
but it works. The hundreds of RS 
QSOs he has made attest to the 
performance of his equipment. 
His satellite activities include 
chasing all mode A satellites for 
contacts and monitoring UoSAT 
telemetry and ACM activity when 
signals are good. 

For satellite reception, Ron 
uses a Drake 2-A HF receiver as 
the heart of the system. An Ame- 
co 6CB6 ten*meter pre amp pro- 
vides the necessary front-end 
gain for satellite work, His down- 
link antenna consists of a wrre 
running up through a small hole 
in the sheelrock and down the 
length of the attic. A homebrew 
Nuvistor receive-converter can be 
used with the Drake for two-meter 
reception. 

On the transmit side, Ron starts 

"When You Buy, Say 73" 




Photo B. Fishing and satellite chasing have a tot in common. 



with a Santec LS-202A handie- 
talkie. This little-known rig did 
not catch on in the marketplace, 
but provides almost three Watts 
of LSB or USB output in addition 
to standard FM operation. A 
Tokyo Hy-Power two-meter am- 
plifier connects the handie-talkie 
to a Lunar amplifier at the an- 
tennas. With this combination, 
Ron can select two-meter out- 
puts from one-half to 40 Watts, 
Ron's antennas include an 11* 
element Cushcraft rotated only in 
the horizontal plane or there are 
various verticals he can use when 
the satellites are at high eleva- 
tions. The Santec also provides 
two-meter FM reception of the 
UoSATs. 

Ron tracks the satellites without 
a computer. Most of the time he 
needs simple approximations 
since just one antenna in the sys- 
tem rotates and onfy in one plane. 
Take a look around your shack. 
You may be on the satellites 
sooner than you think! 

Fishing and Satellites? 

While everybody else was up at 
Dayton hamming it up. I was out 
on a quiet Texas lake casting for 
the big one, fish that is. Just what 
do fishing and satellite chasing 
have in common? Quite a bit, from 
the beginner's viewpoint. I am not 
much of a fisherman. In fact I had 
only been seriously fishing once 
before, and that was years ago. I 
could have gone out by myself 
and caught a few, if I were lucky, 
but instead i went in the company 
of some other hams who enjoy 
fishing more than radio. The only 
handie-talkie that went out on the 
lake was mine. 

Where do you go to find fish? 
When do you go? What kind of fish 
are you looking for and what 
equipment and methods work 
best for catching them? After 



you catch them, what do you 
do with them? The list goes on. 
For me there were a lot of deep 
mysteries involved. For my com- 
panions it was all second nature, 
The same is true for amateur 
satellites. 

Where are the satellites? When 
do I listen? What type of satellites 
are up there and what equipment 
and procedures work best for 
hearing them? You can find an- 
swers to these questions by read- 
ing magazines and books, but the 
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someone who actually operates 
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ington DC 20044. You can also 
call during East Coast business 
hours at (301^589-6062. It's up to 
you to make the first move. What 
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73 Amateur Radio • July. t9B7 63 




Mike Stone WB&QCD 
POBoxH 
Lowden IA 52255 

DAYTON RECAP 

The 1987 Dayton Hamvention 
is now history! Friday was a rainy 
disaster for the flea market but 
sunny skies prevailed on Satur- 
day and Sunday for busy sales! 
An estimated 30,000 amateurs 
from all over the world attended 
the affair; if you haven't made It 
out there, you should go— it is a 
real experience! Let me tetl you 
what took place as far as fast- and 
slow-scan TV and FAX, 

We rode out with John Gebuhr 
WBGCMC of Ihe Greater Omaha 
ATV System (G.O-A.T.S-— how's 
that for a name?) We stayed 
overnight in Indianapolis with his 
parents and got a chance to visit 
from the mobile rig with a few of 
the Indy ATV crowd. We saw the 
K9LPW ATV/R Indianapolis ATV 
repeater system in action, though 
it put out pretty poor strength pic- 
tures at a limping 2 Watts of pow- 
er The group is suffering from 
^seJt-defense" problems that 
hopefully will be resolved {consid- 
er one of WBGCMC's new "super 
hi-rejection," 15-pole, interdigital 
duplex filters, fellas), 

P.C. Electronics unveiled and 
sold our {show stock) of their new 
902-928-MHz line of AM trans- 
mitter/receivers. Tom W60RG 
had built a working display unit of 
the TXA5-33 system and the 
TVC-9 downconverter housed in 
a weatherproof Hammond box. 
They showed off a newly-avail- 
able, 1-Watt 70-cm "mini" trans- 
mitter unit (KPA5) for those who 
already have ATV downconvert- 
ers and just need to add a trans- 
mitter. Tom also had his usual ar- 
ray of other ATV components and 
modules and a few Mirage D1 01 
amps, all which also sold out on 
the first day. No new ATV FM gear 
was available from P.C, 

Don W9NTP and Sue W9XL of 
Wyman Research of Indiana had 
a booth lined up with all kinds of 
new goodies! Congratulations, 
Don, on getting that FM "on-carri- 
er" ATV sound receiver circuit 
module built up and going for 
the WR-450 transceiver; The WR- 
450 now gives the average ATV 
amateur a choice between the 
standard 4.5 subcarher sound or 
a direct and more powerful on- 



carrier FM transmitter and receiv- 
er! The WR-450 rig is now really 
two systems in one: a 420-450 
tunable FM rig and a 420-450 
ATV transceiver. Those of you 
who have worked direct FM-mod- 
ulating sound systems know that 
for ATV on-carrier sound is supe- 
rior to reduced subcarrter send- 
ing. The WR-450 transceiver 
features are not found in any oth- 
er manufactured ATV system. It 
is refreshing to see an ATV man- 
ufacturer "listening" to the needs 
of the FSTV consumer and de- 
veloping such a product! At Sat- 
urday night's USATVS workshop 
session, it wasn't surprising to 
see a large number of hands go 
up in the air when Bruce Brown 
WA9GVK/4 asked who else was 
using on-carrier sound tech- 
niques besides the Washington 
DC Metrovision ATV Group. The 
number of hands that were raised 
tor ATV repeater systems that 
used on-carrier sound, however, 
was surprising! 

W9NTP also had several new 
ATV additions to his fine line of 
equipment. The WR-1500 is a 
small 2.5-Watt (peak) "mini 11 
transmitter with on-carrier sound 
for only $149,95 or with both OC 
and subcarher for $1 59.95. It fea- 
tures a 10-pm connector that 
powers the camera, a single-plug 
camera input, a sync stretcher, 
and a metal rf-resistant cabinet. 
This unit, when teamed with the 
small DC-1 downconverter, 
makes for a great pair of portable 
or mobile send/receive units. 

Don and Sue also showed off a 
brand new WR-FM-4912 UHF du- 
al-band (420-450-MHz and 902- 
906-MHz)* switchable ATV receiv- 
er unit housed in a Silvernail 
SE-la*type cabinet. This receives 
both AM and FM HAM-TV trans* 
missions! 

The AM receiver outputs on 
channel 3 or 4 rf and the FM re- 
ceiver outputs into a video moni- 
tor, with audio. The FM module, 
which detects the 6-MHz audio 
subcarher offset, has de-empha- 
sis circuitry, a lighted tuning me- 
ter, and an internal speaker. Price 
is $374.95, The Wymans also had 
the new WR-FM-1250 1255-MHz 
FM transmitter, which has a 5-10- 
Watt output and uses a 4-MHz 
crystal-controlled deviation and 6- 
MHz audio subcarher The WR- 
FM-4912 FM ATV receiver is also 




Howard Nurse W6LLO works his Apple He computer on SSTV. 



available. It tunes 1215-1325 
MHz and has the 6-MHz FM audio 
subcarrier, switchable de-empha- 
sis, GaAsFET front end, and other 
goodies. For product technical de- 
scription and picture brochures, 
write and send SASE to the Wy- 
mans at RR#1, Box 95. Waldron 
I H 46182. 

John Beanland of Spectrum In- 
ternational had good sales on Sat- 
urday and Sunday. His booth dis- 
played the DY-20 900-MHz 
J-Beams with 17 dB gain, which 
turned the heads of Tonna owners 
and prospective buyers. He had 
28-, 48-. and SS-element J-Bearns 
and Microwave Module products, 
John gave one heck of an interest- 
ing technical lecture on interdigi- 
tal filtering at the USATVS Satur- 
day-night ATV workshop session. 
Communication Concepts, Inc., 
of Ohio had nothing new to show 
in ATV gear, as far as I could see- 
Kin ney Software had a booth 
again this year and Dick was 
showing off his TRS-80C CoCo 
and Commodore 64 wares of 
SSTV low-resolution products. I 
didn't have a chance to visit with 
Dick this year so I don't know if he 
has anything new. 

Robot Research, Inc., of San 
Diego had a bit better location at 
the Hamvention™ this year. Hun- 
dreds viewed high-resolution 
1200C color SSTV pictures, Tom 
revealed to some persistent am- 
ateurs that they were indeed 
giving serious thought to mar- 
keting Robot 1200C kits with the 
addition of FAX receive and com- 
puter printer hard-copy printout. 
AEA showed off their new PK-232 
6-mode interface that now in- 
etudes FAX, I was a little disap- 
pointed that it didn't show the in- 
coming FAX pictures on the TV 



monitor screen and was limited to 
printing them out only on the Ep- 
son and compatible dot-matrix 
printers. 

The Tom O'Hara W60RG Sat- 
urday afternoon Fast-Scan ATV 
forum was heavily populated! I 
counted about 200 or so at the 
meeting. Tom gave a talk on 
"Fast-Scan TV Basics," He intro- 
duced Gary Heston W6KVC of the 
former Southern California ATV 
Club who talked about special 
events that can be shown on ATV. 
He showed some aerial pictures 
of helicopters, parades, etc. He 
also demonstrated cordless ATV 
by transmitting the entire meeting 
on his camera-mounted KPA5 
unit, Bruce Brown WA9GVK did 
an excellent job of explaining the 
pros and cons of AM vs. FM TV, a 
subject of hot debate among 
ATVers recently. He also suggest- 
ed standards and equipment. His 
lengthy chapter in the 1987 ARRL 
Handbook is required reading for 
the ATV enthusiast. 

This forum was followed by ihe 
Don Miller's SSTV forum meeting. 
Don introduced Garnet Bebe- 
meyer WBGUNB and Jim Wil- 
liams, Jr. KC5VC for an IBM PC 
Robot 1200C show. Samuel 
Mormino WA7WGD of Interface 
Systems of Texas was supposed 
to talk about his new development 
of a high-resolution SSTV scan 
converter and was to give a live 
demonstration, but he failed to 
show. Attendance at both the Fri- 
day night W0LMD/W9NTP and 
Saturday afternoon forum ses- 
sions were low. I counted about 35 
people at the beginning of the Sat- 
urday SSTV meeting, Stow-Scan 
TV is hurting, folks! 

The FAX boys gol three great 
hours of forum time on Sunday 1 



64 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



Weather Satellites moderator 
David Latsch introduced Robert 
Popham of NOAA, who spoke on 
what would take place in the next 
25 years in WEFAX. Dr. Jeff Wal- 
lach N5ITU from IBM spoke on 
building WEFAX stations by us- 
ing computers. Dr. Grant Zehr 
WA9TFB gave updates on Soviet 
satellite monitoring techniques, 
Mike Mogil of NOAA spoke on 
weather satellite image interpre- 
tation. And Charles Pocius from 
Northrop spoke on VHF receivers 
for WEFAX. Unfortunately, again 



this year, no one addressed the 
issue of sending FAX pictures and 
information by amateur radio — a 
facet which, in my opinion, should 
not be ignored. 

The Friday and Saturday ntght 
USATVSy SPEC-COM and PARC 
ATV workshop sessions were well 
attended with a registration of 84. 
16 USATVS state section man- 
agers attended these sessions. 

At the Friday night USATVS 
workshop, speakers included; 
WB0QCD on "The N9CAI ATV/R 
Super System," WBGCMC on 



"Omaha ATWWeather Radar 
System" and ''Duplex Filters for 
ATVers/' W3SST on "Using the 
Big-Wheel H-Omni Antenna with 
Cone Shielding for Closer Spac- 
ing, " N7DOH P s "VCR Demo of 
the New Seattle WA ATV group/' 
and K2KGX on "Simplex ATV Re- 
peater Experimentation/ 1 Several 
VCR tapes wefe run and recep- 
tion of the Dayton ATV Repeater 
was established, 

Saturday night workshop ses- 
sion speakers included: WB8ELK 
on "Helium-filled 80,000-foot ATV 



Balloon Special Event Project/' 
KB9FO on "Chicago ATV/R Up- 
date' ' and "HAM COPS VCR Pro- 
ductfon f n Bruce Brown on "FCC 
Matters and Music Docket Com- 
ments," and G3BVU on "Under- 
standing Filtering Techniques." 
ATV mobiles and home-brew 
projects were judged and prizes 
awarded. 

If you go to Dayton next year 
and are interested in Fast-Scan 
TV operations, please plan on at- 
tending one of these work- 
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CIRCLE 297 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 65 




John Edwards K12U 

PQBox73 

Middle Village NY 1 t379 

CONTEST CONFESSION 

Okay, you got me. I'm not a big 

contest fan. I just don't see the 
point in going after anything that 
doesn't give me either fun or 

money. 

Call me stupid, call me crazy 
(and you will), but ( can't find any 
enjoyment in spending an entire 
weekend yelling nonstop into a 
microphone or poundmg a key. 
For what? To see my name print- 
ed at the top of a list in some ham 
magazine? Heck, whenever I feel 
an urge to see my name in print, I 
just write another article. Writing 
takes tess time and pays better, 
too. If you want to see your name 
in print, but can't write, go rob a 
bank or take your clothes off in the 
local Shop 'N" Bag Do anything 
but clutter-up valuable frequency 
space. 

As you've no doubt gathered 
by now, I pretty much consider 
contesting a base form of spec* 
trum trashing, Of course, that 
doesn't mean I've never partici- 
pated in a contest. As a kid, I frit- 
tered away numerous hours 
yelling incomprehensible sweep- 
stake exchanges and hammering 
out section names. But can you 
imagine an adult doing that sort of 
thing? Really! 

Anyway, I hate cheating, and 



ham contests are loaded with 
some of the biggest liars and 
skunks I've ever encountered^ 
Just who cross-references ail of 
those contest logs anyway? No- 
body. Who's listening to hear 
whether you gave the complete 
exchange to the other fellow? No- 
body, of course. 

In most contests, you can prel- 
ty much write down whatever 
contacts you want and win first 
place without turning on your 
rig. That way, you can spend 
your weekend playing ball with 



Anyway, don't you just love 
the guys who use the endless- 
loop tapes? With the reverb? 
And speech compression? And 
distortion? Can you imagine what 
Hiram Percy Maxim would say 
if he could hear those char- 
acters? I'm sure it would inspire 
the Old Man to find a new appli- 
cation for his famous silencing 
equipment. 

Of course, the current crop of 
code-based contesters aren't 
any better than their phone 
counterparts. Computers have 
taken all of the romance and skill 
out of CW competitions. What's 
the sense of using Morse code, 
an antiquated two-level encod- 
ing system, when a modern, 
high-level code like ASCII can do 



/ pretty much consider contesting a 
base form of spectrum trashing. " 



the grandkids, tightening the 
screws on your walker, or catch- 
ing up on the latest issue of Mod- 
em Maturity. 

What really bugs me is the way 
contest organizers have comman- 
deered the HF bands, particularly 
20 meters. There isn't a weekend 
remaining in the year that isn't ru- 
ined by one sort of on-air activity 
or another. And the behavior! 
Heavens! If 2 meters hasn't con- 
vinced you that ham etiquette is 
dead, the behavior of contesters 
will. And they all supposedly know 
the code — so much for the "keep- 
ing out the riff-raff theory/" 



the job much better? Well, there is 
no sense to the situation, of 
course, A modern-day CW con* 
test is really only a test of mi- 
croprocessor clock speeds and 
brute rf energy. 

And, speaking of brute rf ener- 
gy, just how many contesters real- 
ly pay any attention to the FCC 
and that silly ol" rule they have 
about maximum allowable pow- 
er? Most, perhaps. {I'm opti- 
mistic.) But the guys running the 
Kalifornia Kilowatts and Galve- 
ston Gallons are wiping all of the 
law-abiding contesters out, so I 
rarely get to hear them. 




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Messy, messy, messy. 

If the ham authorities really 
wanted to clean up the contest 
scene, they would try injecting 
some order into the ranks. Just as 
sporting events need referees or 
umpires, contesters require an 
authority force to patrol their activ- 
ities. "Radio Umpires." 1 would 
call them. 

These volunteer minions o! 
the ether would scan contest 
frequencies— listening only— to 
monitor the behavior of partici- 
pants ~ If a contester were found 
cheating or somehow disturbing 
the electronic peace, the radio 
umpire would have the power to 
either assess penalty points or to 
disqualify the offender from the 
contest. The degree of power 
vested in the umpires would rest 
in the hands of the contest orga* 
nizers. Personalty, however, I'd 
be all for giving the umps Capital 
authority. 

To prevent charges ot favor- 
itism, cronyism, or impropriety, 
a Radio Umpire penalty could 
only be imposed if the infraction 
were observed by at least two 
other umpires. (The umpires 
could be linked together for 
coordination purposes by a pack- 
et network or HF net) With three 
or more umpires witnessing a 
clod's behavior, the hopeless 
miscreant would have little re- 
course but to accept the judgment 
imposed. 

Good idea, right? You know, I 
have the time to dream up such 
creative thoughts because I'm not 
wasting my weekends contesting, 
Yessir, 

CQDXCQDXDEKI2U.B 




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66 73 Amateur Radto • July. 1987 



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73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 67 




Chad Harris VP2ML 

PC Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

THE TEN MOST 
WANTED COUNTRIES 

What are the ten most wanted 
countries by DXers worldwide? 
Every year The DX Bulletin con- 
ducts a survey of thousands of top 
DXers throughout the world to 
determine which are the rarest 
countries on the amateur bands. 
The survey is by far the most 
comprehensive of its kind, and 
has been conducted for more than 
ten years, which provides some 
historical perspective, Let's have 
a look at the toughest countries to 
work and their prospects for legiti- 
mate amateur radio activity in the 
near future (see Table 1). 

Note that the information in 
Table 1 comes from some very 
experienced DXers; more than 
20% of those who returned the 
survey had worked ait the coun- 
tries on the current DXCC list! 
Another 5% need only Albania to 



tries on the list, was shot at 
during his attempt to swim to 
shore in Albania! Shades of 
Baldur DJ6SI's attempt to operate 
from Spratley Island. 

What are the chances of a legiti- 
mate amateur radio operator from 
Albania? Frankly, they have never 
been better! Albania has been 
turning more to the outside world 
since the death of its long-time 
Marxist dictator. They have re- 
cently finished a railroad into 
neighboring Yugoslavia, and 
signed a peace agreement ending 
their 40-year war with Greece. As 
the Albanian officials come to 
realize that amateur radio holds 
few threats, and offers many 
benefits, to their backward coun- 
try, they will allow at least token 
operation on the ham bands, such 
as we see from Iraq or Taiwan. 
Amateur radio in China is a prime 
example of what can happen in 
Albania in the next few years. 

However, don't hold your 
breath waiting for the next ZA 
contact. Nor betfeve every ZA 



"Two of the Ten Most Wanted 
Countries have been on the air and 

workable in 1987/' 



have "worked them all/ 1 With 
only 10% of all DXCC members 
on the Honor Roll {within 10 coun- 
tries of working alt 317 current 
DXCC countries, the group that 
has worked them all is an elite 
group indeed. 

Albania: ZA tops the list of Most 
Wanted DXCC countries and has 
for several years. Albania is a 
country that is hard even to visit, 
much less operate from. In fact, 
the operation by DL7FT from 
Albania that provided many DXers 
with their only ZA QSL is viewed 
with as much credibility as some 
of Don Miller's notorious opera- 
tions from Maria Teresa Reef and 
similar spots. 

There is a club whose members 
try to visit as many countries as 
possible — analogous to the 
DXCC goal of contacting as many 
countries as possible. Albania 
heads their list of the most diffi- 
cult, as weSL One member, who 
has visited most of the 318 coun- 

68 73 Amateur Radio ■ July, 1987 



rumor you hear on the bands. The 
first legitimate operation from 
Albania may well be a quick 
demonstration without advance 
warning, but it should be followed 
soon by more extensive opera- 
tions by locals, and maybe even 
some DXpedition activity. Keep 
your fingers crossed, and hope 
that the Albanian officials soon 
come to the understanding 
that ham radio is good for their 
country. 

South Yemen: Number two on 
the Most Wanted list is South 
Yemen 70, which is among a 
handful of countries mat has said 
officially and in writing that they 
will not permit any amateur radio 
activity. The country has nearly 
been destroyed by a prolonged 
civil war that has left millions 
dead and much of the country 
devastated* Foreigners are 
viewed with suspicion, at best, 
and radio gear is always consid- 
ered to be spy equipment. Most of 



§ 


Country 


Prefix 


% Needing 


1 


Albania 


ZA 


81 


2 


South Yemen 


70 


75 


3 


Bouvet Island 


3Y 


74 


4 


Burma 


XZ 


72 


5 


Andaman Is. 


VU4 


72 


6 


Vietnam 


XV 


68 


7 


Afghanistan 


YA 


67 


8 


North Yemen 


4W 


65 


9 


Libya 


5A 


57 


10 


Laos 


XW 


56 



Tabte 1, The Ten Most Wanted DXCC Countries. 



the recent confirmations of 70 
contacts come from ES mining TT old 
logbooks for VS9A QSOs from 
years ago, QSOs that now count 
for 70, if the operator is still alive 
years later and still has the logs 
and QSL cards. 

Bouvet: This Antarctic island 
ranks third on the Most Wanted 
list, thanks to the difficulty of 
landing on the rock and ice, A 
DXpedition to Bouvet would be 
very expensive, as the recent 
Peter I trip ($60,000) and Heard 
Island trip ($50,000) showed. And 
there would be considerable 
personal risk involved. The Peter I 
Island DXpeditioners may have 
encountered the best weather in 
100 years for their trip. The next 
group to Bouvet might not be as 
lucky. 

However, there are no political 
barriers to a Bouvet trip; only 
monetary and time constraints. 
It's only a matter of time before 
someone gets permission from 
the Norwegians and arranges for 
the trip. This wifl probably be a 
well-publicized DXpedition. 
(Maybe we can convince the LA 
DX Group that oprgamzed the 
highly successful Peter I trip to 
have a hand in the Bouvet trip!) 

Burma: XZ ranks fourth on the 
list, and is another country that 
prohibits all amateur radio activi- 
ty. Surprisingly, however, several 
stations are on the air from Bur- 
ma, with permission from their 
governments, but they are located 
in the north of the country, which 
is still under control of people 
whom the Rangoon government 
call rebels. The DXCC desk will 
accept Don Miller's 1965 opera- 
tion, despite his propensity for 
stretching the truth about where 
he was realiy located, and the fact 
that the DXCC desk has a letter 
from the official Burmese govern- 
ment saying that there has been 
no legitimate amateur radio 



operation from the country since 
1964! Consistency is not a mark of 
DXCC accreditation procedures. 
Don't expect the Burma logjam to 
break for many years. 

Andamans: The best news in 
the Top Ten is that this lor^g- 
sought country has been on the 
air in a major way since the survey 
was taken in mid- 1986! Thanks 
in part to the fact that the Prime 
Minister of India is VU2RG, 
Barathi VU2RBI and other opera- 
tors have twice travelled to this 
vacation spot off the Indian coast 
and put VU4APR and VU4NRO 
on the air for weeks at a time in 
early 1987. This should take care 
of most of the demand for 
Andamans for a few years. Sever- 
al other groups are trying to get 
permission to operate from the 
Andamans. This one should dis- 
appear from the Most Wanted 
ranks for some time! 

Vietnam: XV is another 
toughie. Since the excellent oper- 
ations of the late Don Reibhoff 
XV4AC in the 1970s, we have 
been without a legitimate XV 
QSO. Several amateurs travel 
regularly to Vietnam on business, 
and they continue to press for 
resumption of radio activity, but 
chances are slim for now. Per- 
haps in a few years this one will 
open up, 

Afghanistan: This is another 
one of the countries that officially 
prohibits amateur radio. Since the 
Russian invasion and occupation, 
YA QSOs have been nonexistent. 
Nor is there much hope for any 
change until the Russians leave. 
Given the strategic location of the 
country, that won't soon happen. 
Another ,J Don't hold your breath" 
country. 

North Yemen: 4W has been 
showing signs of opening up to 
amateur radio in the last year, and 
DXers are hoping that the trend 
will continue, Exxon and other oil 



companies are actively exploring 
for oil m North Yemen, and among 
their exploration crews are 
several amateurs who are work- 
ing for official permission to 
operate in the ham bands. Some 
of these operators have made 
QSOs. especially 4W1AA, 
but none have obtained other 
than verbal permission, which 
doesn't cut the mustard at the 
DXCC desk. Prospects are good 
here, however; we should see 
valid QSOs in the relatively near 
future. 

Libya: 5A ranks 9th on the Most 
Wanted list, and again, we have 
documented activity from Libya 
in 1987! Bert SAGA has been very 
active on 20 CW and 15 SSB. 
thanks in part to a rig donated 
by the European OX Foundation 
and an antenna from the Interna- 



tional DX Foundation. Bert has 
placed some restrictions on his 
contacts, especially asking only 
for signal reports— no questions, 
please — and he is adamant about 
"insurance 1 QSOs, If he has 
worked you before, he'll say so in 
no uncertain terms and ask you to 
give another amateur a chance at 
this rare QSO, His GSL manager 
SP6BZ (not in the 1987 Callback t 
unfortunately) has further re- 
quested that no callsigns appear 
on the envelopes to him. But the 
restrictions are remarkably easy 
to live with in exchange for a valid 
5A QSO I wonder if Qadafy has 
any idea that Bert is working U.S. 
stations? I suspect that he would 
not approve! 

Laos: XW rounds out the Top 
Ten. Laos falte into the same cate- 
gory as Vietnam, They are none 



too keen on strangers* and ham 
radios and spy equipment seem 
indistinguishable. Some time in 
the future this one might open up 
to DXpedition or local activity, but 
I wouldn't count on a legitimate 
XW operation soon. 

The good news is that two of the 
Top Ten (Andamas and Libya) 
have been on the air and workable 
in 1937, and will undoubtedly lose 
that dubious distinction of being 
Most Wanted this summer. And 
two more have a reasonable 
chance of producing radio QSOs 
in the near future; Albania and 
Bouvet. That leaves six toughies, 
three of which are among the the 
six countries that prohibit amateur 
radio. Look for some shuffling in 
the Top Ten in 1987, but little 
change beyond the loss of Libya 
and Andamans, 



The best prospects for taking 
their place on the list? Bangla- 
desh S2, presently #11, will cer* 
tainiy move up unless someone 
can wrangle operating permission 
soon. Stations in the United Arab 
Emirates (#12) are presently on 
the air, and South Sandwich (#13) 
might welt see activity by the end 
of 1987. Mount Athos is next on 
the list; if the Greeks, who stopped 
the Italians from operating there, 
don't mount their own expedition 
to SV/A. then maybe we shoufd 
delete Greece from DXCC! Mo- 
zambique, presently #21, stands 
the best chance of moving up the 
list, as it is the next country with 
political prohibition of ham ra- 
dio, and not mere physical or mon- 
etary restraints. Watch for the 
1907 DX Bulletin survey for the 
answer! ■ 



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73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 69 




TTY LOOP 



Marc L Leavey, M.D. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
PikesvitleMD 21208 

Okay, CoCo fans, here comes 
the second barrel, so hold onto 
your hats T because Pm going to 
knock your socks off! (Sorry about 
all the mixed metaphors, but they 
sure felt good!) 

Last month 1 presented a pro- 
gram for a simple implementation 
of RTTY on a TRS-80 Color Com- 
puter {CoCo}. This month, the real 
blockbuster. Thanks to Dan Dow- 
nard K4KWT t Technical Consul- 
tant and columnist at < The Rain- 
bow > magazine, and the Delphi 
Information Utility, we are able to 
present one smashing RTTY pro- 
gram here in RTTY Loop. 

The program itself, called 
RTTYM.BIN, is a fulMeatured 
RTTY program written for the Col- 
or Computer by Dan Cobb. Al- 
though originally written only for 
the older Disk Basic ROM, Ver- 
sion VO. patches are available to 
enable its use with the newer Disk 
Basic ROMs. At this time, I do not 
have any information about its use 
with the new CoCo-3. 

While the program is of par- 
ticular interest to disk users, tape 
interfacing is supported, so you 
don't have to have a disk, al- 
though having one certainly 
makes operation more conve- 
nient. 

I guess that the best way to 
illustrate the capabilities of this 
program is by looking at the 
available command set. Here's 
the RTTY1-1 command set: 

From Receive Mode 

< CLEAR > Switches to transmit 
mode. This puts you in the trans- 
mit mode and turns on your trans* 
mitter. The cassette relay can be 
used to key the transmitter's 
push-to-tatk line. 

<SHIFTxCLEAR> Clears 
the screen (does not clear receive 
buffer). 

A Auto capture buffer— This al- 
lows you to set the program to au- 
tomatically open the receive 
buffer when it receives a certain 
group of characters, and close 
again when it receives a different 
group of characters. After you 
press "A 1 ', the program will ask 
you for the starting characters. 
Whatever you type here is what 
the program waits for before it 



opens the receive buffer. After 
you have entered the starting 
characters the program asks for 
the ending characters. This is 
what the program waits for before 
it closes the receive buffer. After 
you enter the ending characters 
the program is in the receive 
mode but the receive buffer is 
closed. Upon receiving the start- 
ing characters the buffer opens. 
Then when ti receives the ending 
characters it closes again. To exit 
the "auto capture' : mode, press 
the < BREAK > key- 
El Save keyboard buffer. This lets 
you save the current contents of 
the keyboard buffer to a disk file. 
See "M" for entering information 
into the keyboard buffer. See M R M 
for file name specifications. 
C Clear receive buffer. This clears 
the receive buffer and resets the 
receive buffer screen counter. 



press the < BREAK > key to save 
the buffer, it will force the program 
back to receive mode automata 
cally when this buffer fs trans- 
mitted. When transmitting a buff- 
er that you did not press the 

< CLEAR > key before ending the 
buffer, the program stays in the 
transmit mode until you manually 
press the < CLEAR > key. 

F Freeze receive buffer. This 
causes the receive buffer to be 
closed or froaen. You can still see 
what is being received but it is not 
being stored in the receive buffer 
By pressing the 'T key again, 
you wilt reopen the receive. 
H Displays help file. This gives 
you a short explanation for 
each command. The program 
pauses between each page. To 
continue to the next page, press 

< ENTER > ; press < BREAK > to 
return to the receive mode. 

K Kill disk file. By using this com- 
mand you can kill any disk file. 
After you press ll K" the program 
wih ask you for the name of the file 
to be killed. After you enter this, 
the program will ask if you are 



Tft/s program seems to answer 

most of the requests the CoCo 

crowd have been asking. " 



D Disk directory. After you press 
"D" the program will ask for the 
drive number. Enter the number 
of the drive of which you want a 
directory, The program displays 
the directory in a two-column for- 
mat. If you want to stop the direc- 
tory from scrolling off the screen, 
press the < SPACE BAR > , then 
press < ENTER > to continue the 
directory. At the end of the directo- 
ry the program will display the 
number of free granules left on 
that disk. The program also re- 
turns to the receive mode after Ihe 
directory is completed. 
E Enter station buffers. There are 
10 station buffers numbered 0-9, 
After pressing il E T \ press the 
number of the station buffer you 
want to enter. Now you can 
type whatever you want to put in 
this station buffer. Each station 
buffer can contain up to 255 char- 
acters. When you are finished 
with this station buffer press the 

< BREAK > key. The program will 
store this buffer to disk. Each 
time you use the program this 
buffer will be the same, until 
you change it by entering some- 
thing new in it. If you press the 

< CLEAR > key just before you 



sure you want to kill this file. You 
can press " Y" for yes or any other 
key for no {see "R" for file name 
specs). 

L Transmit line. This function lets 
you type in a line (up to 255 char- 
acters) to be transmitted immedi- 
ately. After you press "L'\ type in 
whatever you want transmitted. 
When you are finished, press the 
< CLEAR > key. Then whatever 
you typed will be transmitted. 
+ Retransmit last line, This lets 
you retransmit the line you trans- 
mitted using the "L M command. 
This should be used only direcly 
after using the "L" command or it 
can produce unexpected results, 
M Enter message buffer. This lets 
you type a message or anything 
else that you want to transmit. The 
keyboard buffer is about 6000 
characters in length. When you 
are typing into the keyboard buffer 
the program will give you word 
wrap-around at 32 characters. 
While you are typing a message 
you can use the left arrow to cor- 
rect any mistakes, but do not 
backspace past the line on which 
you are working. When you are 
finished, press the <CLEAR> 
key and then the < BREAK > key. 



The keyboard buffer is now ready 
to transmit or you can save that 
message to disk by using the "B" 
key* Every time you press the "M M 
key the present contents of the 
keyboard buffer is erased and 
what you type will be put at the 
beginning. 

O Set printer parameters. After 
pressing "G" you can select the 
number of the option you want 
changed. The program defaults to 
600 baud and 132 characters per 
line on the printer. 
P Print receive buffer or disk file. 
When you press 4l P" Ihe program 
will ask you to get the printer ready 
and press < ENTER >. After you 
have pressed < ENTER > you will 
be given a choice of printing the 
receive buffer or printing a disk 
file, Select whichever you want to 
do at that time. If you select a disk 
file, you will be asked to enter the 
file name. Add :1. :2 H or :3 if the 
disk file is to be printed from any 
other disk drive than drive 0. 
Q Quit and return to Basic. This 
exits you out of the RTTY1-1 
program and cold-starts your 
computer. 

R Save receive buffer to disk. This 
lets you save the current contents 
of the receive buffer to a disk file. 
After pressing J R" you will be 
asked for a file name. This file 
name can be up to 8 characters 
long plus a 3 character extention 
following a/ between the file name 
and the extension. You can also 
add the drive number you want it 
saved to. Examples: TESTFILE/ 
DAT or TESTFILE/DAT:1 Both 
save using the same file name ex- 
cept the first one saves to drive 
and the second to drive 1 . 
S Select RTTY speed. Here you 
can select the RTTY speed you 
wish to use. After you press "S T ' 
the program will display a list of 
RTTY speeds you can select. Just 
press the number of the speed 
you want to use. The following 
speeds are available: 60 wpm 
Baudot, 66 wpm Baudot, 75 wpm 
Baudot. 100 wpm Baudot, 145 
wpm Baudot. TtO baud ASCII 7 
bit, 1 10 baud ASCII 8 bit, and 150 
baud ASCII 7 bit. The program de- 
faults to 1 1 baud ASCII 7 bit, 
V Freeze video display. This tog- 
gles the display of RTTY being re- 
ceived. When you press M v" the 
first time it freezes the display but 
any RTTY received is still stored 
in the receive buffer. The next 
time you press n V" it will unfreeze 
the display and continue to dis- 
play the RTTY being received. 

From Transmit Mode 

< CLEAR > Returns you to the re- 



70 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 



ceive mode. This returns you to 
the receive mode and turns your 
transmitter off if you have enabled 
the push-to-talk line via the cas- 
sette port. 

< SHIFT >< CLEAR > Clears 
the screen. 

<LEFT ARROW> Sends a 
RTTY ID. This sends: DE YOUR- 
CALL plus a carriage return. 
<SHIFT><LEFT ARROW> 
Sends one line of 32 RYs. 
<UP ARROW> Transmit disk 
file. This lets you transmit any 
data or Basic computer pro- 
gram (saved in ASCII) from the 
disk. After you have pressed the 
< CLEAR > key that puts you into 
the transmit mode you may now 
press the <UP ARROW > key 
and the program will ask you for a 
file name. After youVe entered 
the file name, extention, and drive 
(if other than drive 0), press 

< ENTER > and the program will 
begin to transmit the file you 
entered. To stop any transmission 
before it is completed, press 
the < BREAK > key then the 

< CLEAR > key. 

<SHIFT><UP ARROW> 
Transmit keyboard buffer. This 
will transmit the current contents 
of the keyboard buffer. You can 
enter a message in the keyboard 



buffer using the "M" key from the 
receive mode. If nothing is in the 
keyboard buffer, the program will 
stay in the transmit mode and wait 
for you to press the <CLEAR> 
key again. 

<OOWN ARROW > Transmit 
station buffer 0-9. To use this, 
press the <DOWN ARROW > 
and the screen will then change to 
a brighter color. Now press the 
number of the station buffer you 
want to send (0-9}, After the sta- 
tion buffer has been transmitted, 
the program will stay in the trans- 
mit mode unless you added the 
< CLEAR > key to that buffer 
when you stored it to disk, or you 
must press your < CLEAR > key 
again. 

Impressed? I sure was when I 
saw this program, which seems to 
answer most of the requests the 
CoCo crowd have been asking, 
Best of all is how you can get a 
copy of this program for your 
very own. 

I had initially intended to run 
a Basic loader for the program, 
similar to the one run last month 
for the shorter CoCo program. Un- 
fortunateiy. when 1 put such a 
beast together, it was over 700 
lines Jong. I don't think I could ask 



my editors to publish such a mon- 
ster, and I seriously doubt if any of 
you would have the fortitude to 
type it in. 

Therefore, Jet me tell you how 
to get a copy, First oft if you 
are a subscriber to Delphi, it's 
easy. Log on, go to the CoCo 
SIG (group coco), and look at 
the telecommunication data 
base. There you wilJ find a group 
of programs, upJoaded by Dan 
Downard. which contain the full 
RTTY1-1. ak.a. RTTY64, pro- 
gram. They are available under 
the heading RTTY/ ASCI I TERMI- 
NAL. Download them and you 
are set. 

For those of you who don't 
have access to Delphi. Dan has 
given me permission to distrib- 
ute the program tg you the same 
way I send out other information. 
Send me a blank disk, return disk 
mailer with postage, and two dol- 
lars, and t will whip up a copy and 
send it off to you. On that copy 
will be all of the files, with a short 
text fife to read which tells you 
the patches needed to adapt it 
to the newer DOS chips, how to 
insert your eallsign, and any oth- 
er patches, bugs, or comments 
received. 
Once again, my sincere thanks 



to Dan, Delphi, and < The Rain- 
bow > for sharing this with us, 

I mentioned a few months ago 
that I have been looking at one of 
the new ^super-box* terminal 
unit/modem/TNCs. Well just to 
let a hint pass, it's made by AEA. 
and there are at least 232 reasons 
why I am impressed. Next month, 
I'll tell you the tale of this remark- 
able piece of equipment, which I 
think stands to revolutionize digi- 
tal communication. 

For some reason, plenty of 
folks are showing a renewed in- 
terest in the modes covered by 
this column. (Maybe it's this 
column?) I have looked at more 
than a few books being pub* 
lished. and will see what I have 
to say about those, too. Sorry 
about the paucity of letters late- 
ly; I wanted to get the infor- 
mation to you about the CoCo 
programs covered over the last 
two months, and something had 
to give. Next month, however, I'll 
pull out some of the finest re- 
ceived from the USPS. Compu- 
Serve (75036,2501), or Delphi 
(MARCWA3AJR). For now, I 
guess I'll just submerge myself 
on this hot summer's day in the 
ever changing, ever growing 
world of RTTY Loop.B 




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CIRCLE 47 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 71 




EATHERSAT 



Dr. Ralph E. Taggart WB8DQT 
602 S. Jefferson 
Mason Ml 46854 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

This month I am going to an- 
swer some of your questions 
about photographing weather 
satellite images. First, however, a 
plea! If you are going to write with 
questions or anything else where 
you want a reply, please enclose 
an SASE- This may seem elemen- 
tary, but fewer than half the ques- 
tions I get have that magic 
stamped envelope enclosed, it is 
hard enough to keep diligent 
about replies under the best of 
conditions, so please give me a 
break! 

Weather satellites represent a 
highly visual medium, and it is not 
surprising that we face the prob- 
lem of how to preserve the im- 
ages, either for later analysis or 
just as a permanent record. One 
of the primary advantages of FAX 
systems is that they provide such 
a record as a matter of course. 
This is especially true of direct 
printing systems where the pic- 
ture is immediately available with- 
out further processing. 

If you are using a CRT monitor 
or a scan converter, however, the 
most effective permanent record 
(and indeed, the only possible 
record in the case of a CRT sys- 
tem) is to photograph the display. 
On the surface that is quite sim- 
ple, but there are many problems 
that can arise. Basic photography 
breaks down into two possible ap- 
proaches— "instant" pictures 
and the use of roll film. 

Instant Photography 

So-called "instant" " photogra- 
phy boils down to the use of one of 
several varieties of Polaroid"* film 
and cameras. While none of the 
options is truly instant, results are 
available in anywhere from 15 
seconds to a few minutes, de- 
pending upon the film/camera 
system employed. AH share two 
principal disadvantages— a high 
cost per print and the fact that you 
are usually limited to a fixed-size 
format. If speed is alt-important, 
however, you really have to ac* 
cept these as a fact of life. 

Your Polaroid black-and-white 
options are fairly limited. Of the 
many cameras the firm has pro* 
duced. most of the earlier ones 

72 73 Amateur Radio « July, 1987 



were designed to take either color 
or B/W film packs. You can often 
obtain a very nice used camera of 
this type without spending much 
money. 

Be warned, however, that the 
only older models for which you 
can easily obtain film are those 
designed to take Type 106 and 
Type 107 film packs. Film for pre- 
vious models, which often used a 
roll-like format, is almost impossi- 
ble to obtain. This is a shame 
since many of these cameras had 
a wide range of focus and expo- 
sure options which were not avail- 
able on more modestly priced lat- 
er models. 

Almost all the cameras using 
106/107 film will require a close- 
up lens and considerable fiddling 
with a ground glass or other focus- 
ing aid to determine the combina- 
tion of distance and focus, so that 
the image will fill as much of the 
film format as possible. Since all 
CRT and monitor photography re- 
quires close focusing and a very 
stable camera mounting, you 
would be well-advised to make 
some sort of a jig or mounting sys- 
tem to hold the camera rigidly in 
the proper position for the dura- 
tion of your exposure. 

In the case of a CRT display 
system, you will have to make ex- 
posures ranging from 200 to 400 
seconds, during which lime the 
camera tens must stay open. This 



01Juiy1987 




NOAA-9 


NCAA- 10 


13128 


4072 


0138.86 


0110.63 


156.85 


84.03 


102.0851 


10T2766 


137.62 


137,5 



Date 
Spacecraft 

Orbit Number 
Eq. Crossing Time (UTC) 
Longitude Asc. Node (Deg. W.) 
Nodal Period (Min.) 

Frequency (MHz) 

These orbital parameters are projected two months in advance 
due to deadline considerations. Accumulated errors due to 
uncompensated orbital decay and other anomalies result in 
expectation of errors up to two minutes and possibly as many 
degrees in terms of the crossing data and possible small changes 
in the indicated period. Users requiring precision tracking data 
should rely on more current sources. 



Table 7. TIROS/NOAA orbital predict data, 



is easily accomplished with roil 
film cameras that have a B (use a 
locking cable release) or T expo- 
sure setting, but these are typical- 
ly lacking on many of the Polaroid 
models. 

You can obtain or fabricate a 
system to add a locking shutter- 
release cable to such cameras, 
but you will need some way to 
override the automatic shutter 
timing. On many models this can 
be as simple as a piece of black 
tape over the electric eye, which 
causes the shutter to remain open 
until released. 

Most of these cameras also 
require batteries of varying volt- 
ages, some of which can be hard 
to obtain. This should not deter 
you, for you can simply wire into 
an external battery of any size 
since you won't be toting the sys- 
tem around! 

In the case of a CRT display 
system, proper exposure must be 




Photo A. A reasonably high quality shot using conventional B/W film. 
What looks tike a UFO to the upper right is the onty thing that mars this 
otherwise acceptable photo. This particular UFO is the fluorescent tight 
fixture on the ceiling of my basement station! 



obtained by adjustment of the 
brightness and focus since the ex- 
posure time is set by the image 
frame period and most of the 
available cameras do not have an 
adjustable iris. If your prints are 
too dark, you will have to increase 
brightness and/or remove any 
CRT fitters you might be using. If 
the prints are overexposed (very 
light to white), you can use fancy 
neutral density filters (or lenses 
from an old pair of sunglasses) to 
reduce the light reaching the cam- 
era and thus achieve proper expo- 
sure at something close to normal 
monitor brightness levels. 

When photographing a TV mon- 
itor used with a scan converter, 
you can often use the built-in cam- 
era exposure control and adjust 
fine exposure with the lighten/ 
darken" controls. 

All of the preceding discussion 
has assumed that you are using 
one of the idiot-proof cameras. 
The company does make cam- 
eras for industry and professional 
use that have manual exposure 
and iris control If you can obtain 
one at an acceptable price, its op- 
eration will be more akin to roll film 
cameras discussed below. The 
same is true of larger format pro- 
fessional cameras that are avail- 
able with Polaroid backs. 

I should also note that the com- 
pany has a variety of professional 
films, some of which will produce 
a negative in addition to the "in- 
stant" print. Such films are more 
expensive and harder to obtain for 
many, but at the expense of some 
additional handling to fix the neg- 
atives, they offer the possibility of 
making additional prints if a large 
format (typically 4x5) enlarger is 
available. 

The newer line of SX-70™ cam- 
eras requires the use of color film, 
but presents many of the same 
operational problems already 
discussed You will find tt much 



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CIRCLE 279 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 73 



easier to obtain accessory items 
such as cable releases and close- 
up lenses for these cameras, 
however, since most are fairly 
current. The use of color films al- 
ways presents problems with col- 
or balance, a subject I will discuss 
below. 

A final comment about Polaroid 
films in general Compared to 
conventional B/W and color nega- 
tive films, the 'Instant" films tend 
to have a noticeably narrower dy- 
namic range. This means that 
they are more critical in terms of 
the proper exposure and also that 
they will have more trouble repro- 
ducing the full range from black 
to white on CRT or TV monitor 
displays. 

You may find that you will have 
to reduce your brightness and/or 
contrast irt order to avoid satura- 
tion at the black and/or white end 
of your display system dynamic 
range. This is a fancy way of say- 
ing that a slightly washed-out dis- 
play will probably yield a better 
photograph with these films! 

Roll Film 

The use of roll films has a great 
deal to recommend it compared 
with the "instant" options. The 
cost per print is usually quite a bit 
lower, the films have a wider expo- 
sure latitude; the cameras are 
more flexible, and you can pre- 
pare primary or duplicate copies 
at any size to suit your needs- The 
price you pay is delay in seeing 
the results— ranging from an hour 
or so to many days, depending 
upon your processing options. 

By far the best roll camera op- 
tion is a single lens reflex 35mm 
that will allow you to focus and 
compose the picture without mar- 
gin for error- Most such cameras 
will focus down on a standard TV 
monitor with no fuss t and even if 
you have to get really close, that 
can be accomplished with inex- 
pensive lens extension tubes, 

If you don't already own such a 
camera, a 1970s vintage Pentax™ 
or other model can be picked up at 
used camera shops for a real bar- 
gain since most serious photogra- 
phers are trading up to today's 
"intelligent" cameras. The ability 
to determine exposure with a 
through-the-lens metering system 
is the only really special option 
you need, so there is no point 
getting one of the newer models 
unless you have some other uses 
fori!. 

Most such cameras will have 
only a B shutter position for long 
exposures, so you will need a 
locking cable release for pho- 



tographing a CRT display, You 
should also use a relatively long 
(1/4- to 1*second) exposure when 
photographing a TV monitor dis- 
play. This is due to the fact that 
such single lens reflex cameras 
employ a focal plane shutter that 
will create a mysterious diagonal 
line across your image if a shorter 
exposure is used, 

You might also remember that a 
complete fast-scan frame takes 
between 1 /60th (non-interlaced) 
and 1730th (interlaced) of a sec* 
ond. If you shoot with a faster 
shutter speed, you will not have to 
worry about the shutter trace 
since you won't get an entire 
frame! 

Although it should be obvious, 
the long exposures required for 



black-and-white processing and 
printing. If you make this invest- 
ment, you will give yourself com- 
plete control over the size and 
composition of your prints, not to 
mention their overall contrast and 
appearance, 

Getting a good reproduction of 
what you see on the screen is not 
easy. Modern automatic proces- 
sors with their computer controls 
are marvelous for the average 
snapshot, but are no match for 
what you can accomplish yourself 
when you know what you want! I 
had reached the point where I was 
beginning to think that I would 
never get any decent scan con- 
verter pictures until I broke down 
and reactivated my darkroom af- 
ter many years. 



"Don't let the photo store 
bamboozle you Into lots of expensive 

equipment/' 



CRT monitor photography will re- 
quire a fully darkened room to 
avoid washing out your image 
with ambient light. TV monitor 
photography doesn't require com- 
plete darkness—but the darker it 
is, the better will be your image 
contrast. 

Also, keep a careful eye through 
the viewfinder for possible screen 
reflections from lights in the room! 
(See this month's picture for a 
graphic example.) You would 
think that these would be easily 
noticed, but they can be over- 
looked \f you don't observe a dark- 
ened screen with some care! 

I eventually avoided all of these 
problems by setting up a small 
monitor and a camera in a crude 
box with a remote shutter cable. 
My scan converter pumps out sev- 
eral hundred WEFAX pictures 
each day, and f never know which 
one might strike my fancy. With 
my little box, I simply reach out 
and snap any picture when the 
main station monitor suggests 
that it is Interesting, and I don't 
have to pay attention to room light- 
ing! 

Film Processing 

Processing your film can be 
your biggest headache. Without a 
doubt, doing the job yourself will 
yield the most consistent results 
and highest quality. Unless you 
are already into photography and 
home processing, you can expect 
to spend $1 50 to $200 to set up a 
very basic darkroom for 35mm 



1 use Kodak P1us-X 7H film for all 
monochrome photography, as It 
combines fairly fine grain with 
good speed. Processing the film 
will require a 35mm film tank and 
the proper chemicals. I use Kodak 
Microdol X™ developer for all my 
film, I dilute the stock solution with 
two parts of water and process it 
for 12 minutes at room tempera- 
ture. I skip a stop bath and simply 
rinse at the end of development 
since Microdol is a relatively slow 
developer. For fixing, I use Kodak 
Kodafix™ since it will do the job in 
about two minutes and has good 
storage characteristics. 

Making prints will require an en- 
larger, chemicals, and paper. I 
process all enlargements in Ko- 
dak Dektol™ and fix with the same 
fixer I use for films, but diluted as 
per the instructions for prints. I 
use Kodak Kodabrome RC tH pa- 
per for all my prints since it also 
works out best for my photograph- 
ic FAX recorder. Try to choose a 
resin-coated paper (that's what 
the RC means) since it will wash in 
a few minutes and can be dried on 
a paper towel after blotting. 

Get yourself a good book on 
darkroom techniques, but don't 
let the photo store bamboozle you 
into lots of expensive equipment, 
Hardware store plastic trays work 
fine instead of expensive dark- 
room trays, and a cheap 7-1/2- 
Watt red nightlight bulb will re- 
place a $40 darkroom safelightl 
My darkroom operations have al- 
ways been low budget, and the 



only inferior photos I have ever 
used have been commercially 
processed! 

Of course, not everyone will car* 
ry their satellite interests as far as 
setting up a darkroom. If you want 
only an occasional picture, it is 
more cost-effective to use com* 
mercial processing, but here you 
will run into a problem. These 
days, while one-hour processing 
of color prints is common and 
overnight processing is the rule, it 
can take you well over a week to 
get a roll of black-and-white film 
processed, and in most cases you 
are not likely to be thrilled by the 
results! The job is also likely to 
cost as much {if not more) than an 
equivalent roll of color prints! 

The problem is that few people 
shoot B/W film these days, and 
even the larger photo-finishing es- 
tablishments will set up for such 
film only every week or so + You 
can take your business lo a cus- 
tom finisher if one is available lo- 
cally, but that will be expensive! 
One solution is to shoot your dis- 
play with color film and take ad- 
vantage of the fast turnaround. 
The problem you will encounter 
here is that of color balance, allud- 
ed to in the discussion of SX-70 



Shooting in color is rarely useful 
with CRT monitors since the phos- 
phors used to get long persis- 
tence (P7 typically) will yield un- 
pleasant colors with color film. 
Even shooting from a B/W monitor 
when using a scan converter will 
yield surprising results— with ei- 
ther print or slide film the image is 
likely to be in tones of blue! The 
films do not react to color the way 
the eye does, and virtually all of 
them will be far enough out of col- 
or balance to be annoying. 

With a little luck and persever- 
ance, you can correct the color to 
a large extent using a very light 
yellow filter (yellow will block blue 
while passing red and green), but 
it will be difficult to find a filter of 
just the right density to do a per- 
fect correction job. You are in 
luck, however, for there is a new 
B/W film, which should become 
more widely available, that will 
solve the problem of both CRT 
and TV monitor photography. The 
film, type XP-1, is manufactured 
by llford, and the one I have tried 
is XP1 400, a 400 ASA t fine-grain 
film that is quite fast (equivalent to 
Kodak Tri-X). 

The thing that makes this film 
unusual is that it is processed us- 
ing color chemistry! Like color 
films, it uses dyes rather than sil- 
ver and can be handled by most 



74 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1987 



processors with the same speed 
and convenience as conventional 
color print films. The print from the 
negatives can also be done in 
your own darkroom on standard 
B/W papers should you want 
copies or enlargements. My wife 
and kids think that a color black- 
and-white film is ridiculous and 
they are probably right! t\ does 
solve a problem, however, and 
you may wish to give it a try- 
Alternatives 

Aithough photography is one of 
the most popular ways to docu- 
ment pictures, there are other 
ways, fn an earlier column I men- 
tioned video printers. None of 
these is yet up to the standards of 
a good photograph, but they are 
convenient. You may wish to keep 
an eye on that technology for fu- 
ture developments. In the mean- 
time, I am working on a project 
specifically for scan converters 
that will blow the socks off any 
video printer. If I get off my duff 
and finish it, I will make it the sub- 
ject of a future 73 article! 

Picture of the Month 

This little item is a reasonably 
high quality shot using conven- 



tional B/W film of a NE quad 
from GOES E as displayed on the 
WSH scan converter with 256 x 
256 resolution and 16 grayscale 
steps. There is a major storm sys- 
tem covering the eastern U.S. 
which we in Michigan considered 
normal winter weather but which 
the folks on the East Coast 
thought was the end of the world! 
Guess it all depends what you are 
used to! 

What mars this otherwise ac- 
ceptable photo is what looks like a 
UFO track in space beyond the 
limb of the earth to the upper right. 
This particular UFO is the fluores- 
cent light fixture on the ceiling of 
my basement station! Some days 
you just can't win! Now you can 
see why I use a dedicated monitor 
and camera In a box. Basically it 
saves me from being embar- 
rassed by the obvious! 

Note 

References to the WSH refer to 
the third edition of the Weather 
Satellite Handbook, available 
from yours truly at the address at 
the beginning of this column for 
$12.50 plus $1 shipping and han- 
dling in the U.S. and $2 else- 
where.! 




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ADVERTISERS 



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65 AEA ,„', 11 

197 Ad va need Computer Cent ro Is , 

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251 Aftronics 65 

194 All Electronics _ . t 60 

Amateur Electronic Supply > 31 

28B Amateur Radio School 69 

4 Amidon Associates 24 

MrlrlL t , , . . r , , . . . . OO 

Associated Radio 53 

16 AstronCorp 16 

Austin Amateur Radio Supply 89 

53 Barkers Williamson 76 

41 Barry Electronics Corp 35 

42 Bilal Co 69 

92 Burglwdt Amateur Radio > . 79 

259 CaEifornia Packet Concepts . 49 

267 Cable Distributors . . Q 

CBC International 69 

157 Cleveland Institute 8 

45 Coaxial Dynamics 83 

285 Coax Plus 52 

174 Colorado Comrn. Center 87 

160 Com-Rad Industries 69 

149 Com West Radio Systems 8 

283 Commerce Tours _ 67 

10 Com m u n ications Special ists . . 2 
209 Communications Specialist . 15 

11 Computer Trader 25 

12 Connect Systems, Inc 1 

264 Da i wa El ect ro n icC o rporatio n 

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Engineering Consulting .... 21 

208 Engineering Consulting 14 

75 Fair Radio Sales 78 

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72 Glen Martin Engineering ... 23 

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Bitt Pasternak WA6ITF 
2819? Robin Avenue 
Saugus CA 97350 

INDECENT INNUENDO 

Obscenity, even by innuendo, 
will no longer be accepted on any 
of the airwaves, including the am- 
ateur radio bands. This is the re- 
sult of several FCC actions an- 
nounced on April 16 and aimed 
directly at removing all offensive 
language from broadcast radio, 
broadcast television, and even 
personal radio communications. 

In a major press conference 
that day, the FCC announced that 
it was expanding its definition of 
what it considered to be "ob- 
scene, indecent, or profane lan- 
guage" and issued what it termed 
a "new standard of decency" for 
broadcasters to follow. Under the 
new policy, television and radio 
stations will have to be far more 
careful of the content of the mate- 
rial they air to be sure it does not 
contain "indecent innuendo" of 
the type now popular on some 
drive-time radio programs. The 
commission stated that it is return- 
ing to its older generic definition of 
what consftutes indecency: "lan- 
guage or materia] that depicts or 
describes, in terms patently offen* 
sive as measured by contempo- 
rary community standards for the 
broadcast medium, sexual or ex- 
cretory activities or organs." 

Since a 1978 Supreme Court 
ruling in their favor, the FCC has 
used a far narrower interpretation 
of what it has the right to deem as 
obscene, based upon what are 
called "the seven dirty words that 
you are not supposed to say on 
the radio or TV;" This standard 
came about as the result of New 
York City Pacifica Broadcasting 
station WBAI having aired a 
George Carlin comedy routine of 
the same name in the early 1970s 
and having been cited for doing so 
by the FCC. The matter wound up 
in the Supreme Court, with the 
government winning the case. 

At their April 16 press confer- 
ence, the commission also 
warned broadcasters that it is no 
longer safe for them to assume 
that no children are viewing their 
programming after 10 p.m., and 
now say that indecent material, of 
any type, is banned from being 
aired at any time when there is 
''reasonable risk" that there may 



be any children in the viewing au- 
dience! The FCC notes that a safe 
time period may exist, but that it 
definitely does vary from city to 
city and that broadcasters must 
adjust their programming sched- 
ules accordingly, 

The FCC decision to expand its 
definition of obscenity appears to 
have come from a myriad of public 
complaints to the commission, In 
recent years, the FCC has been 
receiving in excess of 20,000 let- 
ters of complaint annually dealing 
with the broadcast of offensive 
material. While no broadcaster to 
date has violated the current rule, 
some have been attempting to cir- 
cumvent it and advance their sta- 
tion ratings by using a program- 
ming format called "shock-talk/* 
which at times uses indecent in- 
nuendo In its broadcast material. 

While the FCC has not outlawed 
shock-talk, it has made it clear by 



that N6BHU had vrolated the FCC 
prohibitions on the use of inde- 
cent language over the air as out- 
lined in 97.119. The finding in- 
volved transmissions alleged to 
have been made by Hilderbrand 
over a Los Angeles 2-meter re- 
peater. It was based upon the 
same anti-obscenity guidelines 
that were being used to judge 
broadcast cases (Pacifica vs. 
FCC). However, the review board 
reinstated Hilderbrand's ham tick- 
et after It ruled that regulations 
governing indecent language in 
the broadcast industry were not 
applicable to two-way persona! 
radio. 

The FCC's Private Radio Bu- 
reau did appeal the findings to the 
full commission, but the review 
board action had angered many in 
the ham community, including for- 
mer U.S. Senator Barry M. Gold- 
water K7UGA, Also quite upset 
were the top-brass of the ARRL 

Goldwater made known his 
feelings almost immediately. He 
called members of the FCC before 
his Senate communications sub- 
committee and questioned them 



" The FCC is applying the 

same obscenity standard to the 

private radio sector thai it applies 

to the broadcast industry. " 



several actions that indecent in- 
nuendo is not to be tolerated. The 
commission also voted to send 
warning letters to Infinity Broad- 
casting's WYSP-FM in Philadel- 
phia, Pacifica Foundation KPFK- 
Fftrt in Los Angeles, and student- 
run station KCSB-FM at the Uni- 
versity of California in Santa Bar- 
bara, dealing with what the FCC 
views as various pieces of offen- 
sive material aired by the three. 

So what does all this have to do 
with ham radio? The commission 
is also applying the same stan- 
dard in the private radio sector. 
On April 12, it took an action that 
may eventually impact on every 
private radio user including ama* 
teur radio, CB. land mobile, and 
perhaps even radio-retayed tele 
phone. The commissioners decid- 
ed to overturn a 1983 review 
board action that had reinstated 
the revoked amateur license of 
David Hilderbrand N6BHU of Hol- 
lywood, California. 

Hilderbrand's license had been 
ordered revoked after an FCC ad- 
ministrative law judge had ruled 



on what they specifically intended 
to do in regard to this review board 
decision, Goldwater reportedly 
made it clear to former FCC Chair- 
man Mark fowler that the deci- 
sion was not in the best interest of 
the U.S. amateur service. Gold- 
water never mentioned Hilder- 
brand by name, but at that time 
only one such decision involving 
amateur radio had been handed 
down, the one involving David 
Hilderbrand N6BHU. 

On March 3, 1983, the ARRL 
entered into the Hilderbrand case. 
It filed a 1 5-page "Motion of Inter- 
venor" before the commission. 
The ARRL was not as concerned 
with getting a final revocation of 
N6BHU's license as it was with 
clarifying that both the findings in 
the Pacifica Broadcasting Case 
(explained earlier as the seven 
dirty words) under 1 8 U.S.C. 1 464 
and FCC regulation 97.119 (which 
deals with transmitting indecent 
language on the ham bands) were 
in agreement and constitutionally 
correct. The League based its mo- 
tion on the premise that "an into)* 



erable and unlawful precedent 
had been set by the review 
board." And; that's where the 
matter stood for over tour years. 

Then, on Thursday, April 16, 
1987, the Associated Press re- 
ported that the FCC was also re- 
asserting its authority to regulate 
indecent broadcasts in the private 
sector and noted that the com^ 
mission was "warning amateur 
broadcaster David Hilderbrand of 
Hollywood l California, about re- 
peated use of offensive language 
on the air." Subsequent informa- 
tion supplied by ARRL and FCC 
sources said that the com mission- 
era acted on April 12 to reverse 
the 1 983 review board finding that 
had reinstated Hilderbrand's am- 
ateur license. In doing so, the 
commission noted that the inter- 
pretation taken in 1983 by the re- 
view board was incorrect. That is, 
that standards applied in broad- 
casting were also applicable to 
private two-way radio conversa- 
tions over the air, including ama- 
teur radio. 

Hilderbrand's license was not 
pulled t but this now becomes a 
landmark decision in private radio 
because it both gives the FCC 
power to remove any violator of 
Rule 97.119 from the air and it 
sets definite standards that must 
be observed by all sectors of the 
public when knowingly or even 
unknowingly using two-way radio 
as a part of a communication. As 
an example, if the commission de- 
cides to apply and/or enforce the 
new interpretation across the 
board, users of profanity on CB or 
possibly on cellular telephones 
could conceivably face a penalty. 
Just how far the FCC intends to go 
in its enforcement of the new and 
broader anti-obscenity regulatory 
interpretation is unknown. 

For his part, back in 1983 
Hilderbrand maintained the cor- 
rectness of the review board deci- 
sion that reinstated his license. At 
that time, he told Westlink Report 
that if the commissioners were ev- 
er to rule against him that he was 
prepared to take the matter into 
the federal court system, and 
even to the Supreme Court if nec- 
essary. It took almost four and a 
half years for the commissioners 
to decide that their review board 
decision was incorrect, and they 
have held Hilderbrand responsi- 
ble tor his earlier actions. 

But, there's another twist. 
While the commissioners re- 
versed the review board's 1983 
decision that reinstated Hilder- 
brand's license, they have no 
plans to revoke it or to impose any 



7$ Amateur Radio • July, 1987 77 



other penalty on N6BHLL Given 
as a reason is that there may be a 
legal question dealing with the 
statute of limitations in proceed- 
ing with a penalty imposition, as to 
whether or not license revocation 
might be too harsh a penalty at 
this late date in the case. 

In essence, the Associated 
Press story noted previously is 
correct* and the commission in 
this case is merely symbolic. It's a 
warning to others not to be caught 
using what the FCC views as pro- 
fanity or obscenity on the public 
airwaves, even in a private con- 
versation. You risk your license 
and more if you do. 

Only In California? 

I know you may find this next 
story hard to believe, but as you 
read it I suggest that you think 
"southern California." Think 
about some of the well-docu- 
mented stories of the not-so-dis- 
tant past— tales of the jamming 
of amateur repeaters, simplex 
channels, and even high-frequen- 
cy DX, Malicious interference that 
always seems to get traced to a 
ham somewhere in the southern 
tier of California. The list of ex- 
hams found guilty of this offense 
grows longer every year, and by 
now you would think that every- 
one who has any access to a 
ham rig would know that the days 
of even "fun jamming"— if there 
is such an activity — are over. 
Since the early 1980s, it's been 
"get caught jamming and your 
ticket goes a way." But every cou- 
pie of months a story breaks that 
seems to (ink a licensed amateur 
radio operator to this kind of illegal 
activity, 



And so it was that on Sunday, 
April 1.2, I stepped off an Eastern 
Boeing 727-200 jet to find out that 
another "bust 51 had taken place 
while I was away videotaping a 
ham convention in Kansas City. 
This time it wasn't a ham jamming 
another ham. Nor was it your usu- 
al "ham jams net' T incident. No, 
this time it was a ham that the 
government says has taken on the 
FBI. Here's the story as it stands 
in Eate April. 



the most inopportune time. Just 
when we had heavy traffic or a 
bank robbery situation or some- 
thing where we need it fthe radio 
system], here would come this 
powerful signal, enough to drown 
out and prevent our cars from 
communicating with each other or 
with headquarters." 

Gastil is charged with a two- 
count complaint filed in U.S. Dis- 
trict Court. One count alleges his 
interfering with a government 



"If It's possible to catch an alleged 

jammer of the FBI's radio system in 10 

days, why does it usually take years to 

get the FCC to clean the rats from our 

radio systems and our bands?" 



A San Diego, California, ham is 
at the moment free on $150,000 
bail following his arrest for al- 
legedly jamming the two-way ra- 
dio system of that city's FBI office. 
Extra-class licensee Jerry Edward 
Gastil K6DYD was arrested in his 
vehicle at about 6:15 p.m. by 
FBI agents on Friday, April 10, 
His arrest culminated a week- 
long investigation and surveil- 
lance by FBI agents and FCC en- 
gineers. According to FBI Special 
Agent James Bolenbach, the in- 
terference started on April 1 and 
continued each weekday through 
April 10. 

The interference took the form 
of music and other sounds. Bolen- 
bach told Westiink Report writ- 
er Mike Sullivan WA6HJJ, "The 
interference would start up at 



communications system, which 
is a felony carrying a possible 
maximum penalty of up to 10 
years imprisonment and/or a 
$250,000 fine. A second com- 
plaint is a misdemeanor charge 
of operating on a radio frequency 
without a license. In addition, 
Gastil's vehicle and the radio 
equipment inside it were seized 
at the time of his arrest and could 
ultimately be forfeited to the 
government. 

According to a report in the San 
Diego Union newspaper, the FBI 
filed an affidavit with the com- 
plaint in which the agency assert- 
ed "that Gastil caused music and 
other sounds to be transmitted on 
the FBI frequency, interfering with 
regular FBI transmissions. 1 ' The 
affidavit continues by saying that 



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the signals allegedly produced 
by Gastil were monitored by an 
FBI electronics technician and 
those of the FCC. An analysis 
by the FCC indicated the trans- 
missions were of a type that would 
originate from a mobile unit, and 
that the ability to transmit the 
interference would involve con- 
siderable knowledge of radio 
communications Gastil is em- 
ployed as a radio electronics tech- 
nician by an Escondtdo firm, as 
well as being a licensed Extra- 
class ham. 

The FBI says that on Wednes- 
day, April 8 T Gastil was observed 
as he drove to the top of a hill in 
San Diego. In the same surveil- 
lance, a radio direction finder was 
used. As Gastil drove down the 
hill, interfering transmissions 
were received and the radio direc- 
tion finder operator found that the 
signals were being transmitted in 
a manner consistent with the 
movements of Gastil's vehicle. 

Thus far, authorises say they 
have no motive for Gastil's al- 
leged actions, He was scheduled 
for a preliminary hearing in federal 
court on April 24. 

And that leaves this reporter 
with a big question. If it's possible 
to catch an alleged jammer of the 
FBI's radio system in 1 days, why 
does it usually take years to get 
the FCC off its duff to clean the 
rats from our radio systems and 
our bands? I guess the fact that 
we pay the salaries of all federal 
employees through our taxes has 
little meaning anymore. Obvious- 
ly, we hams just don T t count A 
rather sobering item to dwell on 
from those of us who write the late 
shift in the City of Angels. ■ 




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CIRCLE 294 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Mike Bryce WB8VGE 
2225 Mayflower NW 
Massilion OH 44646 

NOVICES AND QRP 

Let's dig down into the mailbag 
this month. I have to get some 
loose ends tied up and while I'm at 
it, unravel some at the same time. 

One of the most asked ques- 
tions in the fast few months was: 
"What about us Novices?' * Sec- 
ond place went to; "How about a 
look at what is out there for us in 
the way of equipment." I'll try to 
do my best on both questions. 

Good grief, do 1 ever remember 
my Novice days. Scared stiff just 
to make a CW contact with some- 
one in another state was bad 
enough. To try and QSO someone 
running less power than a CB, 
you'd have to be crazy. Well, as 
the song goes, "Still crazy after alt 
these years, 1 ' 

Operation 

Having one oar out of the water 
sure helps when you're running 
low power in the Novice bands. 



youYe running a commercial ra- 
dio, reduce the power to 75% of 
full output. Keep the drive at that 
level tor a month or two. Reduce 
drive again to 50%. Run the pow- 
er output at this level only for two 
weeks. Again , reduce power to 
only 20%, or about 20 Watts of rf 
output. Leave the power at (hat 
level for one month. After that time 
is up. take a deep breath and turn 
the drive control down so no more 
than 5 Watts output appears on 
the wattmeter. (Now would be a 
good time to build that swr meter 
from a few issues ago.) Congratu- 
lations, you've entered the world 
of QRP. 

From an operating point of 
view, 40 meters witl only be good 
for Novice use during the daylight 
and early night times. The foreign 
broadcast stations will eat you 
alive on that band. After dark, 
Switch over to 80 meters. When 
the sunspots get their act togeth- 
er, 1 5 and 10 meters should show 
promise during the day and 
evening hours. 

Calling CQ will now prove to be 



"With all fairness toward 

Heath, the HW-7 had a receiver 

that sucked canal water. " 



First things first. As a Novice, get 
in your log a good number of con* 
tacts. How many is a good num- 
ber? Well* you should be over 
your key fright, be able to send 
CW reasonably welt, and have a 
good relaxed feeling in front of the 
radio. When you can truthfully do 
all the above, you're ready to try 
QRP, Perhaps that may sound a 
bit rash, and I guess it is, but you 
have to get your basic operating 
techniques down before you try 
something different. 

QRP operation can be found in 
the Novice bands at or on the fol- 
lowing frequencies: 3.710, 7.110, 
21,100, and 28-110 MHz. I have 
found that operating on 40 meters 
during the daylight hours wilt pro- 
duce a contact easier than most 
other times. 

Don't jump right into low-power 
operation within the Novice 
bands. Get your feet wet first. If 



much less successful than at the 
100-Watt level. When the bands 
are quiet, CQs may turn up a 
contact, but don't bet a lot of 
money on that happening The 
technique of "tail-endmg" may 
help the Novice. While tuning 
the band, listen for two stations 
that are in QSO. When the sta- 
tions sign with each other, call the 
loudest one. The operator on the 
other end will probably still be lis- 
tening on frequency and will hear 
you call him. 

Try to run the radio selectivity at 
the widest position that is avail- 
able. The reason for this is to allow 
you to hear other stations that may 
be off frequency, yet are calling 
you. After contact has been made, 
close up the selectivity. 

After a few weeks of working 
QRP in the Novice bands, you 
can pass the General code 
test with flying colors. In fact, 





Photo A. The Heathkit HW-8 (top) and the HW-9 (bottom) QRP 
transceivers. 



you could very well do just great 
in a QRM-coping contest as 
well. 

I sure hope this information is 
helpful Quite a few hams got their 
start by running low power. The 
gear is less expensive in many 
cases. 

Equipment 

Running low power does not 
mean running inferior equipment. 
Like many other hams, I burld a lot 
of my own gear I do, however, like 
the commercial equipment also. 
Let's take a look at what Is avail- 
able for the QRP operator. 

I'll first look at the Heathkit se- 
ries of low-power radios: the HW- 
7, HW-8. and HW-9. If you Ye into 
QRP. at some time you'll operate 
one of these radios. The first mod- 
el introduced was the HW-7. Be- 
tween the years 1972 and 1975, it 
sold about 10,000 units. With all 
fairness toward Heath, the HW-7 
had a receiver that sucked canal 
water. Many a modification was 
printed to fix what Heath did not. 
Some of the modifications were 
only slight circuit changes. Others 
used a completely new receiver 
front end. 

Aside from the receiver trou- 
bles, the HW-7 worked quite well. 
It had a power output of about 2-3 
Watts. You could use crystal con- 
trol for the transmitter as welt as 
the built-in vfo. The receiver used 
the direct-conversion scheme. 

The HW-7 t unmodified, will not 
hold its own on todays bands. If 
you want one for your QRP collec- 
tion, that's fine. Plan to pay be- 
tween 30-80 bucks. That upper 



Photo B. inside the HW~8. It has 
one board and is a builder's de- 
fight, i tied a bit, there is a small- 
er audio board mounted on the 
top left, 

end would be for a perfect condi- 
tion HW-7. Supply and demand 
will raise or lower the price. 

The HW-8 was introduced in 
1975. Heath fixed the receiver 
bugs that were in the HW-7. How- 
ever, the cries of the QRP opera* 
tors fell on deaf ears; they again 
used a direct -conversion receiver, 
although it was a great improve- 
ment over the HW-7's receiver. 
Power was boosted a bit to 3-4 
Watts output. The radio covered 
the 8G-1 5 meters. 

Heath sold over 15.000 units 
before dropping the line in late 
1984. The HW-6 has become the 
"Chevy" of low-power operation. 
The radios are still in demand on 
the used market, Plan to pay $60- 
$100 for a used one, depending 
on condition and accessories. 

The HW-8 is going to be a tough 



80 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 




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"When You Buy, Say 73" 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 81 



act to follow. But Heath Company 
is attempting just that with the 
HW-9. the third generation of 
Heath's GRP CW-only transceiv- 
ers. I'm asked time and time 
again, "Which one is the best, the 
HW-8 or the HW-9? " Both have 
their place and their (roubles. 

The HW-9 comes in kit form. 
It is not an easy kit to put togeth- 
er. There are a lot of circuits that 
fit in a very small box. If you are 
new to kit building, get your feet 
wet with something else a bit eas- 
ier to assemble. Then move on to 
the HW-9, 

The HW-9 is essentially a 
stripped-down version of Heath's 
Model 5400 transceiver, incorpo- 
rati ng some of the 5400's best fea- 
tures, minus the high-power mod- 
ule, The HW-9 is shoehomed into 
the same size case as the HW-8. 
The color has been changed from 
the classic Heath green to the 
darker color of brown which Heath 
now sports on their equipment. 
The innards feature two PCBs in- 
stead of one T as in the HW-8. 
Broadband tuning of the receiver 
and transmitter has done away 
with the preselector and push-but- 
tons of the HW-8, 

FINALLY, Heath listened. The 
HW-9 has a single-conversion re- 





Photo C. inside the HW-9. Notice 
how much more complex the in- 
side of the HW-9 i$. This is the 
top view. 

ceiver with a 9-MHz i-f and a four- 
pole crystal filter. Read that over 
again. The HW-9 has a superhet 
receiver instead of the often- 
cursed direct-conversion receiv- 
er. Top things off with RIT, a better 
audio filter, 5 Watts output (3 on 
tO meters), and full OSK (break-in 
keying). 

The basic radio comes with 80. 
40. 20, and 15 meters. You can 
add 30. 1 7 T 1 2. and 1 meters with 
an optional band package. All the 
bands are front-panel-switched. 



Photo D. Bottom view of the 
HW-9. 



The HW-9. like the others, is a 
CW-only radio. The HW-9, with its 
superhet receiver, tunes upper 
sideband. You can't listen to SSB 
on 75 or 40 meters. You are on the 
wrong sideband for those bands. 
You can. however, listen 
to phone on 20 through 10 me- 
ters. Heath sells the HW-9 
for $250. but I have seen the ra- 
dio on sate from Heath from 
time to time for as little as $199, 
That price is for the basic unit; 
add some more green for the band 



kit and optional power supply. 

I have no idea how well the HW- 
9 is selling. It does seem to fill the 
void of a plain vanilla CW-only 
low-powered radio. Only lime will 
tell if the HW-9 can fill the toot- 
steps left by its little brother, the 
HW-8. 

While the HW-9 is a radio for the 
QRP gang, Heath introduced the 
HW-99, which is geared toward 
the Novice. Sand coverage is 80, 
40, 1 5, and 1 meters. The HW-99 
is an HW-9 with a power amplifier 
and 1 10-volt supply all in one box 
(more or less). The final transis- 
tors operate on 28 volts; therefore, 
the unit will not work off batteries. 
You can't add the WARC bands to 
the radio. For a deeper look at the 
HW-99, check out the April issue 
of 73, 

That's about it for this month. 
Next time I'll look at Ten-Tec and 
their line of QRP radios. Coming 
soon: solar/wind power, anten* 
nas. station accessories, and a 
whole lot more. 

Send your photos to me along 
with your comments. Drop a line 
or two or three to 73 headquarters. 
Tell them how much you like the 
QRP column. From my mail bag, 
it's a welt-read column. Thanks for 
all your support. ■ 



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82 73 Amateur Radio • July. 1987 



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When You duy f Say 73" 



CIRCL£ 269 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio * July, 1967 83 



73 International 



NOTES FROM FN42 

A sense of humor can be handy. 
We keep noticing the increasing 
visibility of Japanese influences 
ail around us, but not many know 
that if we are planning on a trip 
abroad from the United States we 
won*t get there without help from 
Japan. Huh, you ask? Well, you 
see, the State Department's new 
million-dollar passport-producing 
machine (4200 per hour) was 
made in Japan by the Uno 
Seisakusho Co.. Ltd.. which came 
out ahead of everyone else in the 
bidding. So, yoi goryoko ot (Have 
a nice trip!) 



Six Independence Days in July 
(in addition to our own, on the 4th.) 
Venezuela's is on the 5th. Ar- 
gentina the 9th t Bahamas the 
10th, Colombia on the 20th t 
Liberia on the 26th t and Peru on 
the 28th. The 1st is Canada Day, 
the 4th is Philippine American 
Friendship Day, It is National Day 
in Malawi on the Bth. France's 
Bastille Day on the 14th, and there 
are two each National Holidays 
and Liberation Days; Iraq on the 
17th and Belgium on the 21 $t, for 
the former, and Nicaragua and 
Poland for the second, on the 18th 
and 22nd. respectively, 




ROUNDUP 

Japan. Congratulations to Ja- 
pan also for developing a personal 
computer using TRON * a system 
which will accommodate the sev- 
eraf-thousand-character Japa- 
nese alphabet. Actually, there are 
three Japanese alphabets, Hir- 
gana, Katakana, and Kan/7. The 
first two (samples spread around 
this page) are phonetic but can be 
used for writing; the last is used 
lor writing only, and is based on 
Chinese characters, of which 
there are more lhan 20,000— so 
many, in fact, that nobody really 
knows the total A sample of these 
is shown below. (There also is 
Roman ji, which more or less 
translates Japanese 
words into the Latin 
alphabet,) 
To the left, are 
La characters saying 
% | (literally) "Stand un- 
der trees, waiting 
for rabbits/* This 
comes from the Chi* 
nese folk tale of the 
boy out hunting rab- 
bits who saw one 
run smack into a 
tree. He grabbed it 
when still uncon- 
scious and then 
waited in vain under 
the tree for more 
rabbits to run into it 
Work the moral out 
for yourself 
Great Britain, Congratulations 
to Shon Wave Magazine for com- 
pleting 50 years of service to the 
radio amateur, and best wishes 
for the next 50* Perhaps in the 
coming years, however, the edi* 
tors will learn technical terms and 




« 





how to spell. I mean, re- 
ally! * k Valve" ' for tube, 
Lisence, spelled li- 
cense (or licence, or is it 
lisense?) Football is 
spelled soccer— or the 
other way around — or 
Rugby? Favor is favour, 
and oh, yes, they drive 
on the wrong side of the road- 
Poland. First notice: The Ninth 
Symposium and Exhibition on 
Electromagnetic Compatibility 
will be held in Wroclaw, Poland, 
June 28-30, 1988. Papers are now 
being called for on any and all as- 
pects of EM, in English or Rus- 
sian; they are due July 15 this 
year. Details available from the 
editor of this column. 

Argentina* The pres- 
ident of the Radio Club 
Boulogne, Marcelo F. 
Avila LU5EIC, is the 
QSL manager for L20 
(contest) calls and 
AZ1ARU/15, which was 
the commemorative 
call for the IX plenary assembly of 
IARU Region II, May io October, 
1986. Address: C.C 39, 1609 
Boulogne Sur Mer, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina. 

Greece. Listen for SY1UA in 
mid-June, writes Associate Pro- 
fessor Lukas H. Margaritis 
SV1ABX, for "a worldwide an- 
nouncement. , by short wave 
SSS two-way commu- 
nication/ The mes* 
sage will be about 
the 150th anniversary 
of the University of 
Athens. A special 
award-QSL card will be 
sent to all stations mak- 
ing contact. 









Brazil. Received just in time for 
this issue: hot news: Cool HI An- 
nual Fire Prevention Week ss June 
29 to July 5, and ZZ8ADV (SSB) 
and ZZ8VMC (CW) will be active 
on bands 10 to 80m. QSL man- 
ager, PW8DP, PO Box 
84. Porto Velho, RO- 
78900, Brazil. Thanks 
to Ron ZZ8ADV. 

Finland. Radio Fin- 
land offers North Ameri- 
ca (except Connecticut) 
1 -800-22 T -9539 as a 
source of recorded in- 
formation and a place for you to 
record comments. These will be 
mailed to Helsinki. Your voice will 
NOT be used in programs. 
Thanks to Radio Sweden Interna- 
tional Bulletin 1931. 



^F^:* * 




AUSTRALIA 

Jim Joyce VK3YJ 
44 Wren Street 
Aitona3018 
Victoria 
Australia 

MORE VK8 

Why another article on VK8? 
The article in the May issue was 
about Alice Springs which is in the 



crocs last March, one in full view 
of a busload of American tourists. 
A cartoon in a focal paper shows a 
crocodile reading a newspaper 
headline, "Croc Attacks Boost 
Tourism," and saying to a com- 
panion, "Perhaps if we stop eat- 
ing them, they'll go away. " It is a 
sad fact that in the last two years 
more people have been attacked 
or eaten by crocs in the northern 
parts of Australia than by sharks 
for the whole of Australia, in the 
last decade. 

There are plans for a tourist 
hotel to be built in Kakadu Nation- 
al Park, where Crocodile Dun- 
dee was filmed. It will be in the 
shape of a crocodile, with the 
guests entering via the open jaws. 
(I wonder where the staff will 
have to enter?) (For the last few 
months, Northern Oueenslanders 
have been trying to solve the prob- 
lem by eating the crocodiles, ac- 
cording to the Sydney Morning 
Herald. "They are munching their 
way through hundreds of croc- 
odile steaks a week . , one take- 
out outlet is selling crocodile 
burgers." — Ed.] 

Darwin's Pioneers, Without 
doubt, Darwin was our first multi- 
cultural society. Located closer to 
Asia than our other cities, in its 
earlier days it was I he crossroads 
where East mel West: Chinese 
gold miners, Japanese pearl fish- 




Larry Munns VK8LM, the "Money Tart." 



dry, red center; the other main city 
in this over-ha I f-a-ml 1 1 ion-square- 
mile area is Darwin, a thousand 
miles to the north, with a tropical 
climate and different lifestyle. 

Crocodile Dundee Country. 
There have been seven people 
killed by crocodiles in the Top 
End" over the last two years de- 
spite the signs all over the place 
saying No Swimming Due To 
Crocodiles! Two were taken by 



ermen, Malays, local aborigines, 
plus Europeans from many coun- 
tries, blended together into a very 
mixed and at times violent society. 
Not so today. With a population of 
65.000. Darwin is the capital of the 
Northern Territory (twice the size 
of Texas), and is a modem city 
with state-of-the-art complexes. 
Much of its up-to-date nature 
dates from Christmas of 1974 
when Cyclone Tracy destroyed all 



84 73 Amateur Radio * July, 1907 




VKBLM's OTH. Left: 5-etement 6m yagi; 8-etement 2m yagi and 3-efe- 
ment triband TH3JK on right Tower has been winched down for the wet 
(cyclone) season. 



The ' "First Class p ' finer to the Rocks, 



of the old character of Darwin p 
along with 95% of the city. 
Crisis and Amateur Radio. 

Amateur radio played a major role 
during the aftermath of the disas- 
ter, with Slim VK8JY being the 
first to make contact with the 
Southern States. He made con- 
tact with Ken VK3AH in Mel- 
bourne. Slim spent 78 hours at the 
mike during this time, while Ken's 
home in Melbourne was declared 
an emergency station, with police 
keeping reporters and the public 
away. Messages by these stations 
were, at times, relayed by the 
Royal Australian Air Force at But- 
terworth, in Malaysia, to relief air- 
craft. This amateur radio involve- 
ment in the Darwin disaster is a 
story all in itself. 

Fun and Games* Amateur ra- 
dio is involved in most of the 
so me times- weird activities up in 
the Top End, For many years Dar* 
win held the title of the largest-in- 
the- world per-head-consumer of 
beer. With excess numbers of 
empty linnies, the city decided to 
have a beer-can regatta in Darwin 
Harbor every year, with the re- 
quirement that all craft had to be 
made out of empty beer cans. 

The Darwin amateurs provide 
communications for this event. 
They also provide communica- 



tions for WICEN (Wireless Insti- 
tute Civil Emergency Network), 
JOTA, and most contests, and en- 
gage in the usual fox hunts, etc L 

With only 160 amateurs of vari* 
ous grades licensed to operate 
within VK8 T only 71 have full call 
privileges to operate on HF, Not 
all of these are active, of course. 
so you have, on average, one HF 
amateur for every 10.000 square 
miles! This does make them a rare 
VK contact. 

VKBDA. The first meeting and 
formation of the (then) Darwin Ra- 
dio Club was held on November 7, 
1966. In those days, there were 
not many resident amateurs. They 
chiefly were public servants from 
other states on th ree-year terms of 
duty. Some stayed on for longer 
periods, and others liked what 
they saw so much they are still in 
Darwin. They were a very enthusi- 
astic and helpful group, and their 
energy led to the start of the ctub 
and VK8DA. the club station, and 
VK8VF, the 2m beacon 

Membership in the club seems 
to vary between 25 and 50. Their 
club station should be heard 
worldwide due to its diverse 
modes and transmission fre- 
quencies (see box). There is an 
affiliate group, the Territory Ama- 
teurs Radio Teleprinter Society. 



VK8DA— relays VK5WI Sunday morning broadcast on 3.555 
MHz (also on 146.5 MH2 t courtesy of Henry VK8HA) 

Club Net— 3.555 and 21.150 MHz Sunday at 1000 CST 
(0030 UTC) 

Beacons— VK8VF on 52.200 and 144.460 MHz 

Repeaters— (I) VK8RTE t Palmerston water tower. 147.000/ 
146.400; (It) VK8RDA. Fannie Bay, 146700/146.100 

All repeaters and beacons buift T maintained, and licensed by 
the Club. 



(TARTS)— VK8TTY; "tarts" is 
slang for girls of loose morals, but 
by no stretch of the imagination do 
members fit this description de- 
spite the titles of the officers. Bill 
"Spud" Murphy VK8ZWM is 
"Chief Tart," Henry Anderson 
VK8HA is "Miss Tart/ 1 and Larry 
Munns VK8LM is "Money Tart." 
The group rebroadcasts the 
ANARTS weekly broadcast with 
local editing each Sunday eve- 
ning on 3,555 and 146.600 MHz, 
with call-back. 




BRAZIL 

Carlos Vianne Cameiro PYJCC 
Rua Afonso Pena 49, Apt 701 
20270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ 
Brazif 

ST. PETER & ST. PAUL ROCKS 

If you're not a crab, a sea bird, 
or a Marine, and you tell me 
you've been landed on St. Peter & 
St, Paul Rocks, two things will be 
clear to me: You are as mad as 
mad can be, and you must be a 
radioamateur — which means ex- 
actly the same thing. 

Ron PY1 BVY and Paulo PY1ZT 
spent ten days operating from 
these "only-God-knows-what-for 
rocks, Tl 640 miles out into the At- 
lantic from Recife, at 00* 56* 
North and 29 21 "West 

One year of planning and expe- 
rience with the OXpeditions to 
Trindade Island (PY0T) and Fer- 
nando de Noronha Island (PY0F) 
brought Ron plenty of know-how, 
but nothing could prepare one for 
the tremendously inhospitable 




Skipper Murrao, 

Sts Peter & Paul Rocks. They are 
a group of 7 or 8 savage vol- 
canic upthrusts none higher than 
20 meters (where Ron and Paulo 
set up), and the largest being 
about 75 meters long and 15 wide. 
No soil, no sand, not a drop of 
drinking water, just thousands of 
sharp volcanic edges making im- 
possible even a single comfort- 
able footstep. 

Strong waves crashed against 
the rocks constantly, making land- 
ing an extremely difficult and un- 
forgettable experience; a small 
rowboat is the only way to get in- 
side the U-shaped stoney bay. try- 
ing to work in perfect synchronism 
with the 5-6-meter high waves. . . 
Now! JUMP! And one has only 
seconds to decide what to aim 
your feet at—if you really do in- 
tend to land on St. Peter & St. 
Paul! 

There are plenty of crabs on the 
lower rocks, and two kinds of sea 

73 Amateur Radio * July. 1987 85 





The ''home on the rocks'" from the boat 



Ron (left) and Paulo at "home. 



birds, the mumbebos and the Lit- 
tle Widows, and they are the 
Rocks' only living presences — ex- 
cept tor bird lice all over, so plenty 
of repellents should be in the lug- 
gage, The two kinds of birds don't 
seem to exactly love each other: 
They live in completely separate 
colonies In this iess4han 1,200 
square meter area. 

The temperature is a constant 
26° C, the wind is permanently 
blowing, the equatorial rains 
come hard and sudden and leave 
as suddenly, there is an ardent, 
burning sun which is extremely 
dangerous if not properly consid- 
ered and respected. The expedi- 
tioners' not-so-heavy canvas was 
simply torn away in the first strong 
gusts, and only a very heavy one, 
courtesy of the "Skipper" (Ma- 
noei Murrao) was able to last out 
the tennday operation. 

This was volcanic rock, so 
tremors were expected , but Ron 



and Paulo were sure frightened 
when at 1710 GMT on March 24, 
there was a shaking like that of a 
car crossing a light bridge. The 
Skipper confirmed it as an earth- 
Quake the next day; the boat crew 
was used to it as they always 
ftshed around the rocks. 

Daily bathing consisted of pour- 
ing salt water over head and 
body, dipping it from tidal pools 
with a leather hat. This was be* 
cause around the rocks lived a 
fish like a piranha, two spans long 
by one high, . -any living bait 
dropped in the water was torn to 
pieces in seconds, and Ron had 
touched a just-caught one and 
was surprised by a sharp bite to a 
finger tip. 

It took fou r and a half days to get 
to the Rocks in the 13.5 x 4 meter 
fishing boat, and it then was a day 
and two nights before weather 
conditions permitted landing. This 
involved getting 20 packages and 




s 



the equipment ashore, including 
the 66-kilo Mongomery generator, 
which was hauled along cables 
fastened to the boats mast and 
the rocks, with seven men pulling 
ropes! 

The first day was spent setting 
up. raising two 10/80-meter verti- 
cals tied by ropes to ihe rocks 
(digging being impossible), and 
setting up the equipment on tele- 
scope-leg tables. And the next 
morning, after the 255-foot long- 
wire was stretched from the main 
high point to another only 5 me- 
ters high, the Rocks went on the 
air, , .2Y0SA and ZYOSB. . .CO, 
CO.... 

The equipment was Yaesu FT 
101 E, FT-7B, FT-9Q1DM, FC-901 , 
101B vfo h MFJ keyer, and the 
1.450-Watt generator. Unfortu- 
nately, the vfo was damaged, and 
no split operation was possible; 
tremendous prleups on all bands 
could be only partially attended to. 
Total QSOs was 6,025 (see table). 

There were plenty of QSY re* 
quests from Asia and Oceania t es- 
pecially for 40-80 and 160 opera- 
tions. The hardest pileup was at 
40m r al times with six or seven 
QSOs per minute. On SSB, 83 
countries were OSO'd, 61 in CW 
mode, and six continents each. 

Alter the 171 liters of gas were 




Bronze plaque affixed to the vol- 
canic rock. 

used up (and also the dehydrated 
soups, biscuits, powdered milk 
and coffee, dehydrated banana 
marmalade, and water, resulting 
in a 3-kilo weight loss for each of 
them), the DXpedition had to end, 
and the task of leaving the Rocks 
began. After three hours of hard 
work all but the longwire had 
been recovered— and there was a 
sudden drastic weather change, 
Strong winds and high waves 
forced the boat away from shore, 
with Paulo and one member of the 
crew still on the Rocks. Time was 
so short that there were no chore- 
es—and the two waited for a high 
wave and dove in. All that anyone 
could think of during the terrifying, 
shocking, unforgettable time it 



The "home*' on the Rocks. 
66 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 











QSOs 






Band 


Frequency 


CW SSB 


Conditions 




10 


21.010/.020 


92 21 


Exc. 






IS 




908 871 




- 




20 


14015/025 


1.301 948 


V. Good 






40 


7.002/005 


831 102 


V, Good 


t 


60 




354 46 








160 


1.832/834 


528 23 


QRN but FB 






Totals 




4,014 2,011 





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took for the 25-30-meter swim 
was the voracious piranha-like 
fish! 

Five days later, Ron and Paulo 
were back in Rio, readying the 
QSL card Ron designed and is 
sure that everyone will like, Lady 
luck had been on the side of the 
DXpeditioners— a little later the 
Skipper called to say that he'd 
tried to recover the longwire, but 
terrible weather and fantastic 
waves didn't allow him even to get 
close to the Rocks. 

The QSL Manager is PY1 BVY 
— PO Box 1502, Niteroi, RJ, Brazil 
24000. 





JAPAN 

Japan Amateur Radio League 

AH Asia DX Contest 

PO Box 377 

Tokyo Central 

Japan 

The 28th All Asian DX Contest 
has been announced by JARL 
(Japan Amateur Radio League). 
Its purpose: to enhance the activi- 
ty of radio amateurs in Asia and to 
establish as many contacts as 
possible between Asian and non- 
Asian stations. The contest peri- 
ods are: Phone: 48 hours from 
0000UTC the third Saturday in 
June (June 21) and CW: 48 hours 
from 0000UTC the fourth Satur- 
day in August (August 22nd). De- 
tails from your radio club. 

Last year, 697 stations partici- 
pated of which only 38 were North 
American. W6RJ t NA5S, and 
K7SS were Continent leaders 
(single-op, single-band) on the 
3.5 t 14, and 28 MHz bands, re- 
spectively, The single-op, multi- 
band winner: K3EST/6 for both 
North America and the world, and 
the multi-op, muitiband winner: 
N6AW for North America. Other 
worldwide winners: UA9SP (3.5), 
UA9SHO (7), 4X8T (14), YC4FRX 
(21), DV1TV (28), and YE0X in the 
muiti op, multiband category, 



POLAND 

Jerzy Szymczak 
78-200 Biafogard 
Buczka 2/3 
Poland 

The XVII meeting of the Polish 
DX Club, held last October in 
Mietno, near Garwolin, drew 
150 members, candidates, and 
friends. Honored guests includ- 
ed Professor Dr. Eng. A. Zieiin- 
ski SP5LVV, former president 
of PRAA, MSc. Eng, J, Rufkow- 
ski SP5JR, current president, 
A.K. Jeglinski SP5CM (one of 
the Nestors of the Polish hams) T 
Region I, IARU officer, W. 
Nietyksza SP5FM, and Marcel 
Bargallo EA3NA, Dr. I-L Cichon 
SP9ZD presided, and gave a re- 
port on the 60 years of DX Club 
activities. 

The Club has 367 full members, 
43 applicants, and 2,238 honorary 
members from 1 24 countries. The 
scores of the T 86 SPDX Contest 
were announced (see box). 

Ill CHAMPIONSHIP 

The III Amateur's Radiolocation 
World Championship was held in 
Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, September 
3-7. This event was held first un- 
der PRAA sponsorship in 1980, in 
Cetniewo, near Wladyslawowo; in 
1984 t the second was held in 
Oslo, (The next will be in 1988.) In 
1986, 120 hams from 17 coun- 
tries, including four from IARU Re- 
gion III, competed. 

The Polish women's team won 
5th place, and individually, Sylvia 
Kurzawska was 7th on 144 MHz. 
K. Slomczynski SP5HS was chair- 
man for the international jury 
which refereed. 

SPflDL/AM UNDER THE SKY 

On Air Force Day, SPflDL 
worked for five hours from an air- 
plane, using a Kenwood TS130, 
Yaesu FT290R, ICOM 1C402, a 



Top Winners 1986 SPDX Contest 

individual stations: SP3IBS, 231796 BY 

Club stations: .„.'>,, ,* SP2PDI, 250560 BY 

1.8 MHz band: SP5ING. 3780 SE 


3.5 MHz band: .......... 

7MHzband: 

14 MHz band: 


......... SP3GEM, 38979 KL 

SP9UI 1, 10906 KA 

, v . . SPNUT pi 38820 KL 


21 MHz band: 

28 MHz band: 

SWL 


SP9CSO, 2204 BB 

SP-0237-WA, 49268 




Right to left: CT4UE, CT4AT, our YL friend, Ines, N6TJ, CT1AOZ, and 
CT1BOH far in the back. (Photo by CT4NH) 



42m longwire, GP on 144 MHz, 
and a drpole on 432 MHz. The 
average flight altitude was 2,000 
meters, With SP6ASD t SP6GWN, 
and SP3DFR operating, there 
were 400 GSOs on 20m, 350 
on 2m and 0,7m, and a few ex- 
perimental on 20m and 10m. 
The first operation of this kind 
was on October 12 T 1985, when 
the hams of Zielona Gora and 
SP3KJB/AM on board a four- 
seater aeroplane experimented 
with the effects on communica- 
tions of engine and weather in- 
terferences. 




PORTUGAL 

Louis Miguel de Sousa CT4UE 

PO Box 32 

S. Joao do Estoril2765 

Portugal 

Been out of Portugal several 
months and didn't have a chance 
to do a column, A couple of things 
happened! Wayne Green is back, 
and I missed "Never Say Die" 
while I was away! 

Don Riebhoff— 1942-1987 

It is so sad when we have bad 
news like this. Don Riebhoff is a 
Silenl Key. Don was a telecommu- 
nications officer for the American 
Embassy, assigned to Lisbon in 
1985. He died in an automobile 
accident in Spain last January, on 
his way back to his post. 

Who doesn't remember Don 
and his activities? By which I 
mean his DXpeditions and trips, 
trips to XU1DX, 1S1A, C31ME, 
G5BNL, ZB2DM, FM0FC, 
HS3DR, XV5AC (I worked him in 



1973), HS4ABM, TI9CF, K7CBZ, 
CT4AT, and K7ZZ in the USA. We 
were in touch quite often— he 
lived seven miles from me on a 
2500-acre farm [quinta, as we 
say) on a hill overlooking the At- 
lantic, 45 minutes from downtown 
Lisbon. 

He had several antennas for low 
bands, like a two-element KLM for 
80m, on an 80-foot crank-up tow- 
er t several Beverages for 160, and 
his big 4-element cubical quad 
was just ready to go up on a 100- 
foot tower. He signed CS0AT last 
year in the CO WPX test. 

Don was born in Detroit Lakes, 
Minnesota, He served in the US 
Army from 1964-66, working for 
Boeing for four years before and 
one year after his army service. 
He joined the foreign service in 
1971, serving in Saigon, Phnom 
Penh, Lisbon ( Antwerp, Prague 
and Baghdad. Memorial services 
were held in the US Embassy in 
Lisbon and at the State Depart- 
ment in Washington. 

60 YEARS FOR REP 

The 60th Anniversary of Rede 
dos Emissores Portugueses is be- 
ing celebrated by an award avail- 
able to licensed hams and SWLs 
worldwide for confirmed two-way 
(or heard) contacts with Por- 
tuguese stations CT1, CU (ex- 
CT2), and CT3, between January 
26 and December 31 , 1987. 

All VHF and HF amateur bands, 
SSB, CW, mixed. RTTY, FM, no 
cross-mode allowed. European 
stations, EA8, CT3, EA9— 60 
points; African and American 
stations— 40 points; Asian and 
Oceanian stations— 20 points, 
Portuguese stations may be con- 
tacted only once per band; the 
same station may be contacted on 
different bands. 



88 73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 





ICOM 



KENWOOD 





IC-735 



IC-751A 



IC-02AT 
IC-04AT 





^2-AT 




JOR7O0O 



IC-28H 
IC-3SA 
IC-4SA 




tntenna Tun#r* 



Key en ft Accessorial 




PUBLICATIONS: 



AMECO 
airfo Amate 
allbook 
for Id Radio 
' Handbook 




TS-71 1 
TS-811 




TS-940S 





TH-215A 
TH-205A 
TH-21 BT 
TH-31BT 
TH-41BT 



TM-2550A 
TM-3530A 




TS-440S 
TS-430S 

R-5000 
R-2000 

NEW! 




TR-751A 




t% c^ sV 



CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-423-2604 

or Other Information AND 
Texas Residents Call: 

(512)454-2994 




on.-Fri. 9:00-5:30 
Sat. 9:00-1:00 
Central Time 



25 N. IH 35 
ustin, Texas 78723 





ANTENNAS 



COOODOiTiON 



Power Supplies 

BENCHER 
PADDLES 



2*317 




2M Ampltfl+rs 

ifcorrcept/ 



B&W 

Accessories 

oiumbia Cable 
Welz Meters 



PACKET 




BUTTERNUT 

HF6V— HF2V— HF4B 




APS— A3— ARX-2B— 215WB & More 
Mobile HF— 6BTV— G6-144B 




• Uusen Antennas 

• DIAMOND DISCONE ANTENNAS 

• VAN GORDEN 




Wyaesu 

v Now In Stock 





PK-232 

PK-64A 
PK-87 



MFJ-1 270-B 
MFJ-1274-B 




Isopole Antennas 







it 



When You Buy, Say 73 



i' 



73 Amateur Radio • July, 1987 89 



Portuguese stations are worth 
one point each; the club station, 
CTlREPor CT6REP, court! 5. No 
OSL cards, but send logs with 
date, time. caHsign of station 
worked (heard), frequency, and 
mode. Provide your full name and 
OTH, and state clearly the en* 
dorsement for which you are ap- 
plying. All applications must be 
countersigned by your national, 
lARU-member, society, to the ef- 
fect that the QSL cards of the con- 
tacts are in the possession of the 



applicant and that the data are 
correctly listed. The separate 
awards are for each mode. 

Awards are free to lARU-mem- 
ber club stations; others send 8 
IRCs or US$4.00; address: Diplo- 
ma 60th Anniversary of REP, PO 
Box 2483, 1112 Lisboa Codex, 
Portugal. Applications musl be re- 
ceived on or before December 31 , 
1987. 

That's it for now, a big Abraco 
for all of you, and see you next 
time. 73. ■ 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Burba nk t \ 
New HAM store open and ready to 
make a DEAL. Wc carry all lines, ship 
UPS. and arc open Sunday. A-TKCH 
ELECTRONICS, 1033 Hollywood 
Way, Burba nk CA 91505 <&t&) 845- 
9203. 



San Jos* C A 
Bay Area's newest amateur radio 
store, New & used amateur radio sales 
& service. We feature Kenwood* 
ICOM, Azden, Yacsu. Ten Tec. San- 
tec & many more Shaver Radio, 
Int.. I775A S. Winchester Blvd., 
Campbell CA 95008. 370-6665. 

New Castk DE 
Factory authorized dealer! Yae&u, 
[COM. Ten^Tec* KDK, Kenwood, 
AEA. Kantrontcs. Saniec, Full line of 
accessories. No .sales rax in Delaware. 
One mile off i-95 p Delaware Amateur 
Supply, 71 Meadow Road, New 
Castle DE 19720, J2g-7728. 



Miami FL 

Casa Marconi, Int Pre -owned com- 
municatiorts equipment. We do re- 
pairs. Send 5ASE for prices. Casa 
Marconi, lDC +t 7189 SW 8th Street. 
Miami FL 33144. 264-K443 



Preston II) 

Ross WB7BYZ has the largest stock of 
amateur gear in trie Inter mountain 
Wesl and the best prices Call me for 
all your ham need*. Ross Distribut- 
ing, 7ft So, Stale, Preston ID 83263, 
852-0830. 



Derry rVH 

Serving the ham community with new 
and used equipment, We siock and ser- 
vice most major lines: AEA. Asuon, 



B&W t Cusheraft. Encomm, Hy*Cam, 
Hustler. ICOM. Kenwood. KLM, 
Larsen. Mirage. Mosley; books, ro- 
tors, cable and connectors. Business 
hours M oft, -Sat. 10-5. Thursday 10- 
7. Closed Sun /Holidays RitendeLI 
Electronics, 8 Londonderry Road, 
Derry NH 03038,434-5371. 

Lyndhurst M 

Finally a hum store in NJ . Located I "4 
mile south of Rt. 3. Hours M-F 10 
a.m. -9 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. -7 p.m. 
Visa. MC Abaris Systems, 276 Ori- 
ental Place* lyndhurst NJ Q7071, 
99MH5, 

Jamestown NT 
Western New York's finest amateur 

radio dealer featuring ICOM-Larscn- 
AEA-Hamironics-Astron. New and 
u&cd gear VHF Communications. 
915 North Main St., Jamestown NY 
14701,(7 1 6)6*4-6345. 

Columbus OH 

Central Ohio's full -line authorized 
dealer for Kenwood. ICOM. Yaesu, 
Ten-Tec. Info-Tech. Japan Radio, 
AEA. Cusheraft.. Hustler, and Butter- 
nut, New and used equipment on dis- 
play and operational in our 40011 sq. ft. 
store. Large SWL department too 
I nitersaJ Amateur Radio. J 280 
Alda Drive, Reynoldsburg (Colum- 
bus) OH 43068, £66-4267. 

Dallas TX 

In Dallas -since I960. We feature Ken 
wood, (COM, Yaesu, AEA, Butter- 
nut, Rithii, amateur publications, and a 
full line of accessories- Factory authn 
rized Kenwood Service Center. Elec- 
tronic Center, Inc., 2809 Ron Ave., 
Dallas TX 75201 , 526-2023. 



DEALERS 
Your company name and message can contain up to 25 words for as little as S 199 
yearly I prepaid), or £50 for three months (prepaid). Ho mention of mail -order 
business permitted. Directory' text and payment must reach us 60 days in advance 
of publication, For example, advertising for the December 87 issue must be in our 
hands by October I si. Mail to 73 Amateur Radio . WOE Center. Peterborough. 
NH 03458. ATTN: Hope Currier. 




ROPAGATION 



Jtm Gray W1XU 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: 


DO 


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, 







Many DX opportunities will present ihemselves in July as the bands stay open 
longer, but high atmospheric noise levels and ihe possibility of many days with an 
unsettled to active magnetic held will hmii the otherwise improving conditions 
While solar flux ts up and improving, magnetic-fieid upsets detract form the good 
news, t'd be on the lookout for excellent VHF opportunities on me days that the HF 
bands are the worst. Remember that named days/conditions could be off by a day 
or Iwo, 



JULY 

SUN MON TUE WED THU llfl SAT 




1 

G 


2 

F 


3 

F-P 


4 

p 


5 

P-F 


6 

F-G 


7 

F-P 


8 


9 
p 


10 

p 


11 

p 


12 

F 


13 

F— G 


14 

G 


15 

G 


16 

! G 


17 

G 


18 

G 


19 

G 


20 

G 


21 

G 


22 

G-F 


23 

F 


24 

F-G 


25 

G 


26 

G-F 


27 

F-P 


28 

p 


29 

p 


30 

p 


31 

P-F 





90 73 Amateur Radio • July T 1987 



THE MOST AFFORDABLE 

REPEATER 

ALSO HAS THE MOST IMPRESSIVE 
PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

(AND GIVES THEM TO YOU AS ST AN DARD EQUIPMENT!) 



BAND 
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UHF 



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$880 
$980 

(Also available for commercial bands!) 



mi 

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FEATURES 



•SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NOHt! 15uV Typ 
•SCLECTTVITY THAT CAN'T BE BEAT- Botfi 6 pofe kLSI 

fitter & ceramic fitter for > I OOCB at t 12kHz HebcaJ 

resonator front end to combat deserts*? & tfUermodL 
•Fiutter proof squelch, Automatic frequency control. 

separate spfcj amphfief 
•CLEAN. EASY TUNE TRANSMITTER, up to 20W Output 

50W with additional PA. 



ACCESSORIES 




*TD 2 DTMF DECODER/CONTROUJR hit only $7B. 
Full 16 digits, 5 functions, toll call restr letor. program 
ma Die Much more. Great for selective calling too? 

•API AUTOPATCH hit only $7J3 Reverse patch & phone 
line remote control std. 

• A P-2 5 1 mpi e x A ut o pat ch . Use w l th above. 

www^AI - 



•CWID kit new low price $48 

Field programmable, Irmers, Ihe works 1 
■COR -2 kit $38 Audio mmer, local spkr amplifier, tail & 

time out timers 
■COft-3 kit, $48, with courtesy beep. 




'MO 202 fSH DATA MODULATOR kit $38 Run up to 
1200 baud digital or packet radio signals through any 
FM transmitter 

'DE 202 F$K DATA DEMODULATOR kit $38 



GaAs FET PREAMPS 

at a fraction of the cost 

of comparable units! 



LNG "(*) 
GaAs FET 
PREAMP 

ONLY $49! 

WIRED/TESTED 



FEATURES: 

•Very Low Noise: 0.7dB VHF, O.SdB UHF 

•High Gain: 1 3-20fJB. depending on f req 

•Wide Dynamic Range: to resist overload 

•Stable; new-type dual -gate GaAs FET 

* Specify tuning range desired 26 30- 46-56. 137-150 
\ 50- J 72. 2 1O230. 400-4 70. Of &OO-960 MHz. 





LNW-(*) 

MINIATURE 

GaAs FET 

PREAMP 

Unbelievably 
Low Price - - - 



0NLY$19/kit, 

$34 Wired/toiled 



GaAs FET Preamp 

Simitar to LNG, 

except designed 

for tow cost & small size. OnJy 5/S'W x l-5/8"L * 

3/4 'H. Easily mounts in many radios 

• Specify tuning range desired 25-35, 35-55, S5 90. 90- 
120. 1 20- 1 50, 1 50-200, 200-2 70. Of 400-500 MH j 



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ONLY $59/kit, 

$79 wired/tested 

GaAs FET Preamp with features similar to LNG 
series, except automatically switches oat of line 
during transmit. Use with base or mobile 
transceivers up to 25W. Tower mtg. hardware 
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* Specify tuning range desired: 120 175. 200-240, oi 
400-500 MHz, 




HRA-(*) 

RESONATOR 
PREAMP 

ONLY $49 VHF 
or $64 UHF 



Low-noise preamps wrth nehcat resonators 
reduce inter mod & cross ^band interference in 
critical applications. 

* Specify tuning range desired 143-150. ISO- 158. 158- 
162. 162- 1 74. 2 1 3-233. 420-450, 450-465. Of 465-475 
MHz 



HIGH QUALITY XMTR & RCVR 

MODULES FOR REPEATERS, 

LINKS JELEMETRY, ETC. 




•FM EXCHTRS: 

Kits only $68 W't SI 46 

TCXO and iia4 oven avaifatrie- 

2Wcont Up lo 3W mtermmem- 
•TA51 for 10M. 6M. 2M. 150-174. 220 MHz. 
•TA451 tor uhf 

FCC TYPE ACCEPTED FO« COMMERCIAL BAJMOS. 
■VHF & UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS. For FM or SS8 Power 

levels from 3 to 45 Watts. Several modete. kits starring 

at $78 




•R1447R220 FM RCVRS 

for 2M 1 50 1 74, or 220 MHz. 

0. 1 &uV sens. 8-pote xtai 4 10 pote ceramic §-f fifters, 

helical resonator front end for exceptional selectivity . 

> lOOdS at ± 12kHz (best available anywhere') Flutter - 

proof squelch. AFC tracks drifting xmtrs. Xtal o*en 

avail. Kit! 138. w/t $198, 
•R451 FM RCVR. Same asaoove but UHF Tuned line 

front end 0.2uV sensitivity. Kit only $138, w/t $1 98- 
•R76 VHF FM RCVR for 10M. 6M. 2M r 220. As above, out 

w/o AFC or hel.fcs. Kits only S9S to $118. 
•R110 VHF AW RCVR for VHF aircraft or ham bands or 

UHF. Kit only $98. 

HOW— FCC TYPE ACCEPTED TRANSMITTERS, 
RECEIVERS, AND REPEATERS AVAILABLE FOR 
NIGH -BAND AND UHF, CALL FOR DETAILS. 



RECEIVING CONVERTERS 



VHF 
MODELS 

Kit with Case $49 

Kit Iti&ft Case $39 

Wired w/case $69 

UHF MODELS 

Kit with Case S59 

Kit leu Case $49 

Wired w/ctH $75 




28-32 

50-52 

5Q-S4 

144 14t". 

US 147 

:«'«< 

146 MS 
350 222 
23(122* 
233-334 

412 -434 

435437 
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433-136 

902 92B 
9Q2922 



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50-54 

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A TV, FM, etc 
Cm be linked 
with receive com 
for trancHve 
1 to 2 W out 
Linear PA's 
available up to 
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For VHF r 
Model XV2 
Kit $79 
Wired $149 
{specify band] 



For UHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit $79 
Aired $139 



Curler 



trnmw 



2ft 30 
24-29 

2ft 30 
JT37-4 



144-14*. 
144-144 

2* 30 
28-30 

144 1M 



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144-1444 

220-222 

320 321 

50-53 



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j HAMTRONICS, INC. ! 

I 65-E Moul Rd.; Hilton NY 14468-9535 ! 

I D High quality equipment at reasonable prices surely | 
j appeals to me; but I want more details before I buy? Rush I 
' my copy of the 40 page Hamtronics catalog by return first | 
J class mail. I enclose $1 ($2 for overseas air mail). I 



Order by phone or mail • Add $3 S&H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
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PhOI10 1 7 16-392-9 430 Hamtromcs* is a registered f/acfemarfe 









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FT-757GX/II 

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HF/VHF/UHF 

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FT-109RH 

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•FT-2Q9RH~2m 
•FT-709RH-440MHZ 



m 





FT23/73R 

• Super "Mini" 
HTs 

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FT-727R 

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FT211RH 

• 2m. FM, Mobile 

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• LCD Readout 

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• Also, FT-711RH For 440 MHz 




FL-7000 

• Solid-Stale Amp For 160-15M 

• Built In Power Supply 

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■ 1200W PEP Input 





FRG-8800 

• General Coverage Receiver 

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• At! Mode Reception 

• Multi-Scanning Feature 

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• 100 Memory Channels 

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• 2M, All Mode Portable 
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• Use Either 12V Battery 
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■ Ten Memories, Dual VFO h s 

• FT 690R for6M Operation 





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• Antenna Tuner 

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KANTRONICS 



Decisions, 





Should vou choose one, two, or all three? 

Choose one-Yaesu's FT-109RH, FT-209RH or FT- 
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Choose two— or even three, and you also get inter- 
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However you decide, you get all this operating 
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MHz). Batteiy saver Push-button recall of 10 memories, 
each that independently stores receive frequency, stan 
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and decode. 



Push-button scanning routines for scanning ad 
memory channels, selected ones t or all frequencies 
between adjacent memories. And a priority feature to 
return you to a special frequency 

You also get a high/ low power switch, power meter, 
backlit display, 500-mAh battery, wall charger, and 
soft case. Plus a choice of many interchangeable options, 
including a VOX headset, fast charger, hard leather 
case, and plug-in subaudible tone encoder/decoder for 
controlled-access repeaters. 

Let Yacsu s 220-MHz FT-109KH, 2-Meter FT 209RH 
and 440-MHz FT-7Q9R give you the decided advantage 
in HT performance and upgrade ability It may be the most 
enjoyable HT buying decision you ever make. 



220 MHz 



2 Meters 



440 MHz 







0-T66 



Yaeso USA 172111 Edwards Road. Cerritos, CA 90701 (213) 404 2700. Repair Service: (213) 404-4884. Parts: (213) 404-4847 

Yaesu Cincinnati Service Center 9070 Gold Park Drive, Hamilton, OH 45011. (513) 874-3100. 

Prices and specifications subject to change; without notice, circle las on reader service card 






s< 



220 : Kenwood 



TM-3530A 

The first comprehensive 
220 MHz FM transceiver 

TM-3530A-25 watts of 220 MHz FM- 
Kenwood style! Features include 
built-in 7-digrt telephone number 
memory, auto dialer, direct frequency 
entry and big LCD. Ail this makes the 
TM-3530A the most sophisticated 
rig on 220 MHz! 

■ First mobile transceiver with tele- 
phone number memory and auto- 
dialer (up to 15 seven-digit telephone 
numbers) 

• Frequency range 220-225 MHz 

• Automatic repeater offset selection— 
a Kenwood exclusive! 

• Direct keyboard entry of frequency 

• 23-channel memory for offset, fre- 
quency and sub-tone 



Big multi-color LCD and back-lit con- 
trols for excellent visibility 
Optional front panel programmable 38- 
tone CTCSS encoder includes 97,4 Hz 




Frequency lock switch 
Digital Channel Link (DCL) option 
High performance GaAs FET front 
end receiver 






L 



TH-31BT/31A 

Kenwood's advanced tech- 
nology brings you a new 
standard in pocket/handheld 
transceivers! 

■ 1 watt high, 150 mW low 
» Super compact and lightweight 
(about 8 oz. with PB-21!) 

• Frequency range 220-224.995 MHz 
in 5-kHz steps 

• BT Series has builHn tone 

• Repeater offset:-l,6 MHz. reverse, 
simplex 

• Supplied accessories: rubber flex 
antenna, earphone, wall charger, 180 
mAH NiCd battery and wrist strap 

• Quick change, locking battery case 



TH-31BT/3IA optional accessories 
» HMC-1 headset with VOX 

• SMC -30 speaker microphone 

• PB-21 NiCd 180 mAH battery 

• PB-21 H NiCd 500 mAH battery 

• DC-21 DC-DC converterfor 
mobile use 

• BT-2 manganese/alkaline battery 
case 

» EB-2 external C manganese/ 
alkaline battery case 

• SC-8/8T soft cases with belt hook 

• TU-6 programmable sub- tone unit 

• AJ-3 thread -loc to BNC female 
adapter 

• BC-6 2 -pack quick charger 

• BC-2 wall charger for PB-21 H 

• RA-9A StubbyDuk antenna 

• BH-3 belt hook 



• 16-key DTMF pad, with audible 
monitor 

• Center-stop tuning-another 
Kenwood exclusive! 

• New 5-way adjustable mounting 
system 

• Unique offset microphone connector 
—relieves stress on microphone cord 

• HI/ LOW power switch (adjustable 
LOW power) 



KENWOOD 



TM-3530A 



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TM-3530A optional accessories: 

• TU-7 38-tone CTCSS encoder 

• MU-1 DCL modem unit 

• VS-1 voice synthesizer 

• PG-2N extra DC cable 

• PG-3B DC line noise filter 

• MB -10 extra mobile bracket 

• CD-10 call sign display 



• MC-60A/MC-80/MC-85 desk mics 

• MC-48B extra DTMF mic. with UP/DOWN switch 

• MC-43S UP/DOWN mic. 

• MC-55 (8 pin) mobile mic, with time-out timer 

• SP-40 compact mobile speaker 

• SP-50B mobile speaker 

« SW-200B SWR/ power meter 

• SW-100B compact SWR/power meter 



TH-31BT with DTMF pad Shown 
Optional RA-9A attached 



* PS-43G DC power supply 

Complete service manuals are available tor ait Ksnwood transceivers and mosf accessories. 
.■ > :ctt\cations and prices are subject to change without novce or obligation. 



KENWOOD 



KENWOOD USA CORPORATION 
2201 E, Dominguez St., Long Beach, CA 90810 
PO. Box 22745, Long Beach, CA 90801-5745